Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
July, 22nd 2009
10:35
 

One of the fundamental principles behind Smarter Planet is the concept of instrumentation – that inanimate objects can be embedded with sensors and connected wirelessly to the Internet. This enables us mere human objects to effectively communicate with those formerly inanimate objects. The hope is that as we are able to collect data from these embedded objects and analyze it we’ll be able to make better, more informed decisions based on all the available information we have.

It’s a concept a number of us here on this blog have talked about in the past (see prior posts from Andy Piper, Jack Mason and myself). If you look at it at the individual object level, it seems fairly novel and can be construed as gimmicky. Houses that tweet? Andy Stanford-Clark, one of our favorite fellow IBMers who has really pioneered this topic, has “instrumented” his house, the local bus, even the local ferry boat to give the public information about this (more on Andy below). But think beyond the individual object to thousands or even millions of embedded objects acros entire systems – say transportation, or food, or healthcare or shipping or even natural ecosystems – think of the incredible benefits we could reap.

This requires, of course, better analytics to makes sense of it all. But coupled together (data+ analytics) it’s truly the next transformative era of computing. As others have stated before, if Web 1.0 was characterized by connecting people to content, and Web 2.0 is connecting people to people, then Web 3.0 is certainly connecting objects to people and to eachother. The Internet of things. Tim O’Reilly has also been talking about this for a while.

What got me onto this topic recently were two nice pieces from Read Write Web (here and here) stemming from a conversation Richard MacManus had with Andy. From the second post, I share this bit talking about some of the real life applications of this kind of instrumentation:

This month IBM made an agreement with Matiq, an IT subsidiary of Norway’s largest food supplier Nortura. The project involves using RFID (radio frequency identification) technology to track and trace poultry and meat products “from the farm, through the supply chain, to supermarket shelves.” This food tracking solution will help ensure that meat and chicken are “kept in optimal condition throughout the supply chain.” The system uses IBM’s WebSphere RFID Information Center, together with IBM’s sensor and actuator solutions.

Matiq offers a great example of instrumenting a food system. But what about if we start to connect that to an instrumented healthcare system and an instrumented traffic and transportation system. You start to see the possibilities of this “system of systems” concept we’ve been talking about in the context of our Smarter Cities conversations.

We’ll continue to probe further here on this blog on the opportunities for the Internet of things. Stay tuned next week for a deeper discussion on the privacy implications of all of this – a key concern that must be addressed at the outset.

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10 Comments
 
September 21, 2014
3:26 am

Fine way of telling, and pleasant post to obtain data regarding my presentation subject, which i aam going to present in school.


Posted by: Overdrive Strategies
 
April 11, 2014
2:35 am

Really Nice post.. i like it


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9:44 pm

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Posted by: monclers
 
March 13, 2010
6:06 pm

Web 3.0 or Web^3. marketing labels is all. Here is an article form a series that describes some of this, I though it was good.


Posted by: Tribster
 
October 24, 2009
7:37 pm

How about connect the consumer product.


Posted by: Denny
 
October 23, 2009
3:21 pm

nobody cares what you think pablo


Posted by: michel
 
September 16, 2009
11:38 am

great point!
thanks a lot!


Posted by: zyy
 
August 4, 2009
12:09 am

Intel is talking about these ‘inanimate objects’ becoming intelligent and connected by being embedded with Intel processors.


Posted by: Valerie Fox
 
July 28, 2009
12:10 am

Great Point!
I think RFID is an good technique to identify every object in this world. But it is not used in the personal life, only in the industry.

P.S. the RSS is only for subscribing the comment. Is there any RSS for the whole web site?


Posted by: Sleven
 
July 22, 2009
10:21 pm

Very interesting! great analysis and vision of our near future.
I liked a lot the parallel traced with the current RFID (radio frequency identification) to the street car traffic.
Go ahead! Congratulations!


Posted by: pablo ciccarello
 
2 Trackbacks
 
August 15, 2009
2:47 am

Web 3.0 is about taming the deluge of data or The Internet of things?…

What’s next? There really is a new era emerging in the Web’s evolution.So what will define Web 3.0?One explanation we’ve heard was that:Web 1.0: Mainstream media and retailers dominate, using……


Posted by: SEO | Destiny Soft
 
July 24, 2009
5:08 am

[...] The Internet of Things. Or Web 3.0 | A Smarter Planet (tags: internetofthings web3.0 ibm) [...]


Posted by: links for 2009-07-24 « IronEye
 
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