Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
Archive for June, 2012

Posted by
Steve Hamm in

Suddenly, Big Data is all the rage. Organizations are deluged with huge amounts of information from a combination of their own computing systems, networks of sensors (the Internet of things) and social networking sites. You can be overwhelmed by data or do something useful with it–and many organizations are harvesting valuable insights from theirs. Today, IBM is hosting a discussion in Washington, D.C. to explore the Big Data opportunities for government, Big Data: The New Natural Resource. Please check in from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Follow @IBMPolicy on Twitter, and Tweet to #BigData and #IBMPolicy.

The Start:

11:45 a.m. Opening Remarks from Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Senator of California

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s new Sequoia computer was recently named the world’s most powerful computer. High performance computing is important for safeguarding our nuclear stockpile, but it’s also key to national competitiveness. That’s why I have taken the lead in assuring funding for our high-performance computing initiatives.

Now, we have another program at Lawrence Livermore, the High Performance Computing Information Center. The center provides computing power and its expertise to help businesses make use of high performance computing.

I have a strong belief that maintaining America’s lead in high performance computing and analytics has bipartisan support Congress.

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Tune in today at 11:30 a.m. EDT for live blogging from the D.C. event, Big Data: The New Natural Resource. Follow @IBMPolicy on Twitter, and Tweet to #BigData and #IBMPolicy.

By Frederick Streitz, director of Lawrence Livermore National Lab’s High Performance Computing Innovation Center

We live in a time of tough economic competition that demands industry and business respond to global market forces as quickly and efficiently as possible. At stake is American leadership in technology as well as other industrial and business domains.

There is growing international recognition of the important role high performance computing (HPC) can play in the innovation that is critical to economic competitiveness. We need only look at the Top500 list of the world’s most powerful computers over the last five years to see that supercomputing is seen as an essential tool for scientific discovery and an engine of technology innovation from France, Italy, Germany and Spain to India, China and Japan.

From a federal government perspective, the competitiveness of American business and industry has become a matter of national security. Continued US leadership in science and technology is considered by many to be critical to the nation’s security and economic prosperity.

In line with this growing recognition, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and IBM are broadening a highly productive 20-year partnership to make HPC and domain expertise in science and engineering available to US industry. LLNL and IBM have formed Deep Computing Solutions, a collaboration that aims to help US companies use HPC capabilities and expertise, at a level previously only available to national research laboratories, to improve their competitiveness in the global marketplace.

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Posted by
Steve Hamm in

Suddenly, Big Data is all the rage. Organizations are deluged with huge amounts of information from a combination of their own computing systems, networks of sensors (the Internet of things) and social networking sites. You can be overwhelmed by data or do something useful with it–and many organizations are harvesting valuable insights from theirs. Join us here from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on June 27 find out what leading thinkers are saying about the Big Data opportunity for government. Please follow @IBMPolicy on Twitter, and Tweet to #BigData and #IBMPolicy.

For IBM and the U.S. government, making the most of big data is nothing new. One of IBM’s predecessor companies supplied the government with tabulating equipment for conducting the population census starting in 1890, Then, in the 1930s, IBM collaborated with the Roosevelt administration to help create the Social Security System,  which you can think of as the mother of all Big Data projects. The government needed a massive and sophisticated tabulating system to track 26 million citizens and connect to employers’ payrolls

This year marks Social Security’s 75th anniversary. It was exactly 75 years ago this month that IBM delivered to the U.S. government the machines that were credited with making the program possible.  Connect to the Citizen IBM blog to learn all about it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by
Jack Mason in

The new and expanded, third-generation version of the Smarter Planet app is now available for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices, Android smartphones and tablets — and for the first time  — as a Windows Mobile app.

As in previous versions, the Smarter Planet blog is one of the app’s anchors along with the Smarter Planet Tumblr, People for a Smarter Planet on Facebook and the IBM YouTube channel.

With the new app, we’ve been able to add some of A Smarter Planet’s companion blogs, including Smarter Commerce and Students for a Smarter Planet.   And we’ve been able to integrate other mobile-optimized sites and sources such as the Social Business Tumblr and Smarter Planet on m.ibm.com.

So how did we bring a planet of smarter content together in one handy app? With the help of a promising new service called The App Builder.

App Builder offers a number of additional features that we will be trying out down the line, including photo galleries, Twitter, event listings and special features on topics such as the 2012 CEO Study.  Please give the apps a try, and if you find the helpful and interesting, please share and rate them. Of course, your feedback in comments here is always welcome. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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by Keith J. Figlioli,  senior vice president of healthcare informatics for Premier healthcare alliance

If you or a loved one were diagnosed with cancer, would you prefer to only have local physicians working on treatment? Or would you rather have physicians who are working with the best minds in America to develop a personalized treatment plan?

Not everyone can receive care at Johns Hopkins or the Cleveland Clinic, and they shouldn’t have to.

Taking advantage of what technology can do is central to this type of information sharing. But today, healthcare providers use technology to solve challenges they see individually, at a price they can afford. Not surprisingly, the result is often dissatisfaction, primarily for two reasons.

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Four years ago, IBM set out a vision for building a Smarter Planet. Behind this promise was the idea that the world could become a more interconnected, smarter and better place to live. IBM Fellow and Global Business Services CTO Kerrie Holley  is an example of one person who has made a difference in making the planet smarter.

Kerrie grew up in the South Side of Chicago—an area known for its crime and poverty. He never knew his father, knew very little of his mother and was raised by his maternal grandmother. Fifty years ago, one might have predicted a young Kerrie to fall victim to drugs, gangs and other negative influences in his environment. Instead, he excelled as a student at the Sue Duncan Children’s Center, where he would later tutor U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Academy Award nominee Michael Clarke Duncan. There, Kerrie developed a passion for science and math, which he would later use to earn a Bachelor’s of Science in mathematics and Juris Doctorate from DePaul University.

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Learn how #analytics is expanding tennis knowledge during our #smarterfriday chat @ 9AM EST on June 22 at http://on.fb.me/uMYDA8

By Alan Flack, Client and Programme Executive, IBM UK

There’s no shortage of European sporting events for fans to enjoy these days. The Euro 2012 football championships are going strong in Poland and Ukraine even while fans gear up for the London Olympics. So, how does the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, whose Wimbledon Championships qualifying rounds kicked off this week, get people to pay attention to tennis?

One way the club generates excitement is by enriching the fan’s experience through the use of cutting-edge technology. For several years, IBM, a sponsor of the Wimbledon Championships, has used the event as a showcase for some of our leading-edge solutions–technologies that we believe can make the whole world work better. It’s a way of using a popular sport to bring our Smarter Planet agenda to life.

This year, in collaboration with the All England Club, we’re introducing a new technology to Centre Court. It’s called IBM SecondSight. Using a handful of strategically placed video cameras, we track the movements of players in real time and present to fans a digital on-screen representation of the match, complete with avatars representing the players. Fans can click buttons to see up-to-the-second analysis of the match. Who is moving faster? Who is running more? Is somebody tiring?

It’s the deepest look ever at the purely physical dimension of the game, enriching the fan’s (and coaches and officials) knowledge of the science of tennis.

Here’s a video that shows how the technology works:

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by Yuchun Lee, Vice President, IBM Enterprise Marketing Management Group

From digital marketing and mobile commerce, to web sites and social media, marketers are exhausted by data, 2.5 quintillion bytes of which are being generated every day. Within the marketing community there is almost unanimous agreement that an integrated technology suite is the CMO’s best bet to regain control and remain connected to consumers.

Yet if I were to ask a room of marketers how many have such a system in place, very few would raise their hands.

So what’s your excuse?

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by Susan J. Wilkinson Smarter Food Supply Networks, IBM Global Business Services

Counting your chickens before they hatch has always been something moms and other wise pundits counsel against, but when you’re the British Columbia Egg Marketing Board, you have to.

The Board, which manages the supply of the 816 million eggs produced in British Columbia (BC) each year, is now using advanced business analytics from IBM to capture, integrate and analyze production and inspection data from more than 130 egg producers to determine when to add or replace chickens and scale production to meet seasonal demand. Now they instantly know how many baby chicks they need today to meet the demand for eggs 36 weeks from now, as well as how well individual producers are performing against provincial averages. Eventually, they will even be able to pinpoint the flock a particular egg came from in the event of a disease outbreak.

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By Kirill Korniliev, Country General Manager, IBM Russia & CIS

In this year’s Battle of the Brains international programming contest held last month in Warsaw, three students from St. Petersburg State University of Information Technology, Mechanics & Optics, a leading Russian technical school,  were named world programming champions beating more than 100 other teams. This may sound like a lucky win for Russia in face of fierce competition from the best universities around the world. In fact, teams from the same university have won the contest three times in the past five years solving some of the world’s most challenging computer programming problems.

This is not only an astounding achievement but indicative of Russia’s great potential on the global stage beyond natural resources. While China is a global leader in manufacturing, and India in the export of services, Russia’s hi-tech skills are creating an opportunity for it to become an innovation powerhouse.

There are real examples of where this is already happening. Previous winners of the Battle of the Brains contest from St. Petersburg have since gone on to establish successful innovative businesses such as Yota which is making waves with its own 4G mobile internet devices. Other past winners have gone on to set up Vkontakte.ru which has established itself as one of Russia’s most famous social networking sites. The computer security firm Kaspersky Lab is perhaps the best known global success story for Russian IT innovation.

And this is not just a potential restricted to skills in Moscow and St. Petersburg. This year’s Battle of the Brains world finals had high performing teams from the Russian cities of Saratov, Nizhny Novgorod, Tomsk and Volgograd. Increasingly these cities are waking up to the value of technology and investing in the development of IT skills. In fact, Russia’s future economic success and diversification is dependent on the successful development of the entire country, not just its main two cities.

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