Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent

by Dr. John Wagner, Manager, IBM Research Collaboratory for Life SciencesMelboune

We live in an increasingly interconnected world where information, goods and people flow between geographical regions with unprecedented porosity. As what is essentially a packet of biochemical information, viruses are no different; with today’s ubiquity of cross-border transportation, their transmission can take place faster over a greater area than ever before. Unlocking the mechanisms of these viruses is of growing importance for both human wellbeing and our global connectivity.

Even an illness like the common cold has widespread health and social impacts. Indeed, the Human Rhinovirus (HRV), the most frequent cause of colds, is believed to exacerbate asthma in about 70 percent of cases; and in Australia alone, the common cold costs employers around 1.5 million workdays, or $600m in lost productivity per year.

Cut away view of the common cold virus. Credit: University of Melbourne

Yet despite selling more than $250m worth of remedies in Australia every year, we still know relatively little about the viruses responsible. By applying high performance computing (HPC) to antiviral research, we hope to not only devise more effective treatments but also set a new benchmark for understanding diseases.

 

In conjunction with researchers at the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences–Melbourne, scientists from St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research and the University of Melbourne are now using IBM supercomputing technology to simulate the common cold at the molecular level.  With the aid of the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative’s (VLSCI) new IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer, these researchers are working to build a fully atomistic, three-dimensional simulation of HRV. As far as we know, these calculations are the first to include not only the 3 million plus atoms of the rhinovirus capsid—or outer shell—and their aqueous environment, but also the virus’ RNA genome, that packet of genetic information necessary for the virus to replicate.

The inclusion of the genome in simulations is critical to the studies, as it affects both the stability of the capsid and the binding of potential drugs. This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses as well. However, doing so requires vast amounts of processing power not previously available to researchers in Australia. The VLSCI’s IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer is ranked as the 31st-most powerful supercomputer in the world, and the fastest not only in Australia but also in the southern hemisphere. Available to life sciences researchers across Victoria, the supercomputer is being used to address a wide range of human diseases beyond HRV, including epilepsy, cancer, polio and malaria.

The significance of this collaborative research extends far beyond the rhinovirus. It could offer a new path forward in adapting drugs to combat other viruses in the same family. And it could accelerate the science behind treatments of new and emerging viral strains, leveraging expertise from different research fields and researchers trained in multiple disciplines, like those in the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences—Melbourne. By tackling such viruses with multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary collaborations, backed by the most powerful technologies on offer, we hope to achieve insights that will benefit all humankind.

Download an infographic on the common cold here.

See story in the Herald Sun here.

Bookmark and Share

Previous post

Next post

47 Comments
 
August 21, 2014
11:06 pm

This website allow to post, so many topics about many information to share, thanks for this apport.


Posted by: Prepagos Medellin
 
August 6, 2014
9:07 pm

Thanks, this article are very important, I read and I feel identificate with this post.


Posted by: Norelis
 
July 31, 2014
10:40 pm

When the human are stronger in some aspects but we have many weaknesses against creature insicnificantes like the viruses. It is difficult to control and I was not imagining the big wasting time, work and money that this one causes. If there were doing proposals in which a plan of monthly vaccination was included for the population or something similar would be fantastic.


Posted by: Prepagos Medellin
 
July 30, 2014
7:00 pm

Me encanta como escribes y das tus punto de vista, gracias


Posted by: etoro como funcion
 
May 31, 2014
11:43 am

podróż aż pociągają wzrok starej pań , zaś płeć nadobna po raz drugi na mnie oszukuje głową , w pewnej mierze chciał


Posted by: rehabilitacja 1
 
April 2, 2014
3:51 pm

but non to stop and prevent this cold from happening. We hope that this collaboration will will result to something positive and and a better understanding of this virus.
its comforting to know that they are using new technology to crack the mystery of one of the oldest infection in the world. There is actually no real cure for the common cold, most of the medication available are just supplements to boost our immune system to avoid complication,


Posted by: Prepagos Medellin
 
March 20, 2014
11:43 pm

God, I can only hope that the IBM supercomputer is able to shed some light on these annoying colds that I contract a handful of times a year. If there was any way that I could prevent such an event from occurring you can bet that I would take it!


Posted by: Josephine
 
March 6, 2014
4:29 am

I can see that you are putting a lots of efforts into your blog. Keep posting the good work. Some really helpful information in there. Bookmarked. Nice to see your site. Thanks!


Posted by: Nasi Pecel
 
December 27, 2013
12:17 pm

IBM has always been at the forefront of research with supercomputers. I was very surprised when I announced the supercomputer based on atoms. great article.


Posted by: Francisco Hernandez
 
December 9, 2013
6:20 pm

Each time the technology is more advanced with time to the quantum computers will be a reality


Posted by: Tu Espacio Personal
 
December 9, 2013
6:26 am

Post a Comment


Posted by: save money
 
November 26, 2013
3:56 am

Really nice article Dr. John Wagner… keep posting


Posted by: Victor Zarov
 
November 9, 2013
10:41 am

Excellent contribution!


Posted by: Federico | gana dinero
 
September 4, 2013
12:56 pm

That’s amazing that IBM is using a supercomputer to simulate a cold.


Posted by: Chicago medical malpractice
 
August 8, 2013
7:37 am

güzel paylaşım


Posted by: ANN
 
August 3, 2013
4:28 am

The invention of IBM is very amazing. What are the main objectives of IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer?


Posted by: Superior Quality Cleaning Services
 
July 28, 2013
7:43 pm

I was more than happy to find this web site. I want to to thank you for your time just for this fantastic read!! I definitely really liked every little bit of it and i also have you bookmarked to check out new information on your blog.


Posted by: Games Girl
 
July 28, 2013
7:43 pm

I was more than happy to find this web site. I want to to thank you for your time just for this fantastic read!! I definitely really liked every little bit of it and i also have you bookmarked to check out new information on your blog.


Posted by: Hooda Math
 
July 19, 2013
1:10 am

Pretty nice post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I’ve really enjoyed browsing your blog http://www.mmorsgp.com posts. After all I’ll be subscribing to your rss feed and I hope you write again soon!


Posted by: wow gold
 
July 9, 2013
7:04 pm

We the human beings are strong in certain aspects but we have many weaknesses against creatures insicnificantes as the viruses. It is difficult to control and I was not imagining the big wasting time, work and money that this one causes. If there were doing proposals in which a plan of monthly vaccination was included for the population or something similar would be fantastic.
Rafael Rivas


Posted by: Games Girl
 
June 22, 2013
5:11 pm

its comforting to know that they are using new technology to crack the mystery of one of the oldest infection in the world. There is actually no real cure for the common cold, most of the medication available are just supplements to boost our immune system to avoid complication, but non to stop and prevent this cold from happening. We hope that this collaboration will will result to something positive and and a better understanding of this virus.


Posted by: Prepagos Medellin
 
June 16, 2013
10:45 am

The common cold virus is typically transmitted via airborne droplets (aerosols), direct contact with infected nasal secretions, or fomites (contaminated objects).;….

My own, personal internet site http://homelifestylejournal.com


Posted by: Tiffany Lowrie
 
May 7, 2013
2:45 am

This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug http://www.mmogoing.com/ attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses


Posted by: diablo 3 gold
 
January 12, 2013
9:33 am

Dr John Wagner is the best i thing.
thank you so much for this informations


Posted by: riad luxe marrakech
 
January 12, 2013
9:32 am

but non to stop and prevent this cold from happening. We hope that this collaboration will will result to something positive and and a better understanding of this virus.
its comforting to know that they are using new technology to crack the mystery of one of the oldest infection in the world. There is actually no real cure for the common cold, most of the medication available are just supplements to boost our immune system to avoid complication,


Posted by: riad marrakech
 
January 8, 2013
8:09 am

I actualy liked this post. Its useful for me. Thanks a lot.


Posted by: Dubturbo
 
January 8, 2013
4:15 am

Yes while reading this post i realy lowed it. Thank you!
Espically in winter i have such as problem.


Posted by: Edebiyat sanatı
 
January 8, 2013
4:13 am

Dr hohn Wanger thank you ! This post is very important.


Posted by: Edebiyat
 
January 8, 2013
4:08 am

Dr John Wagner is the best i thing.


Posted by: seslendirme ajansı
 
December 31, 2012
12:43 am

This article is very important with such a nice content.Mr. John Wagner has done a good job.


Posted by: End of lease cleaning
 
December 29, 2012
11:27 am

This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses,” Dr. John Wagner, the manager of the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in Melbourne, Australia, wrote in a blog post today. [...]


Posted by: yemek24.
 
December 26, 2012
9:31 pm

Dr. John Wagner, the manager of the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in Melbourne, Australia, wrote in a blog post today.


Posted by: africain24
 
December 25, 2012
1:35 pm

good article from by Dr. John Wagner, highly detailed


Posted by: fyben
 
December 23, 2012
2:04 am

güzel paylaşım


Posted by: web sitesi kurmanın en kolay yolu?
 
December 10, 2012
2:08 am

Authentic Nike NFL Jerseys
Nike Houston Texans Jersey
Nike Seattle Seahawks Jersey
Real Madrid Shirts
Barcelona Shirts 2013
Cheap Messi Jerseys
Cheap Ronaldo Jerseys

Cheap good-looking Authentic Nike NFL Jerseys, on our website, what are you waiting for? To come in and have a look!


Posted by: Authentic Nike NFL Jerseys
 
December 10, 2012
12:52 am

i really liked this artical, its really intrsesting and i found it very capativating to read.


Posted by: rajkumar
 
December 4, 2012
9:52 pm

Hi
transmission can take place faster over a greater area than ever before. Unlocking the mechanisms of these viruses is of growing importance for both human well being and our global connectivity thank your combination man and machine.


Posted by: mosaddaque
 
December 3, 2012
10:41 pm

Wow, this is really exciting. I have always wondered when Supercomputers would be put to use for civilians and better health care innovations. With that said, the commenter named Anthony Jennis has a very interesting point about needing to catch colds to build an immune system and clean your respiratory system. I think there are other things for us to deal with to keep our immune systems strong however. :)


Posted by: Vanessa Prepagos Medellin
 
November 23, 2012
6:09 pm

its comforting to know that they are using new technology to crack the mystery of one of the oldest infection in the world. There is actually no real cure for the common cold, most of the medication available are just supplements to boost our immune system to avoid complication, but non to stop and prevent this cold from happening. We hope that this collaboration will will result to something positive and and a better understanding of this virus.


Posted by: tennis fence screen
 
November 15, 2012
7:54 am

good article from by Dr. John Wagner, highly detailed


Posted by: itchy throat
 
November 6, 2012
2:41 am

I really liked this article, really interesting and your point of view is really captivating.


Posted by: tour operator india
 
October 7, 2012
8:24 pm

Which virus will wipe us all out first? Bird flu, swine flu, something made in a lab?


Posted by: Damien
 
September 29, 2012
7:36 pm

We the human beings are strong in certain aspects but we have many weaknesses against creatures insicnificantes as the viruses. It is difficult to control and I was not imagining the big wasting time, work and money that this one causes. If there were doing proposals in which a plan of monthly vaccination was included for the population or something similar would be fantastic.

Rafael Rivas!


Posted by: Rafael Rivas | Aumento de masa muscular
 
July 25, 2012
11:56 am

Another question to possibly help with understanding a cure for HRV that could be factored into later research simulations:

Why do large amounts of Vitamin C (4000mG/day) at the onset of a sore throat seem to stop the virus for me >90% of the time? However, the same dosage does not always work for other members of my family.


Posted by: Pete Thomsen
 
July 23, 2012
5:52 pm

Wow, this is really exciting. I have always wondered when Supercomputers would be put to use for civilians and better health care innovations. With that said, the commenter named Anthony Jennis has a very interesting point about needing to catch colds to build an immune system and clean your respiratory system. I think there are other things for us to deal with to keep our immune systems strong however. :)


Posted by: Health Advocate
 
July 19, 2012
9:18 am

Has anybody considered the implications of us NOT catching colds ? There are so many variations of the virus that perhaps we are designed to catch them on a regular basis through our lifespan as a cleaning mechanism for the respiratory system.


Posted by: Anthony Jennis
 
July 17, 2012
4:02 pm

Dr. Wagner–You did a yeoman’s job of clearly explaining your very significant project and its importance to mankind. Awesome!
Thank you.


Posted by: Molly Brudnick
 
6 Trackbacks
 
December 19, 2012
3:26 pm

[...] more about it in this Smarter Planet blog post by Dr. John Wagner, Manager, IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences-Melbourne, [...]


Posted by: Nothing to Sneeze at: IBM supercomputer takes on the common cold | IBM Official Alumni Group: The Greater IBM Connection
 
July 31, 2012
8:01 pm

[...] “Nothing to sneeze at: IBM supercomputer takes on the common cold” [...]


Posted by: 슈퍼컴퓨터로 만드는 제대로 듣는 감기약 « A Smarter Planet Blog – Korea
 
July 18, 2012
7:53 am

[...] “This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses,” Dr. John Wagner, the manager of the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in Melbourne, Australia, wrote in a blog post today. [...]


Posted by: IBM supercomputer helps wage war on the common cold | Simply Boundless Entertainment
 
July 18, 2012
1:25 am

[...] “This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses,” Dr. John Wagner, the manager of the IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in? Melbourne, Australia, wrote in a blog post today. [...]


Posted by: IBM supercomputer helps wage war on the common cold - BizNax
 
July 17, 2012
8:02 pm

[...] “This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses”, Dr. John Wagner, Manager, IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in Melboune wrote in a blog post today. [...]


Posted by: IBM supercomputer is used to wage war on the common cold | Crowd Funding Today
 
July 17, 2012
7:09 pm

[...] “This will allow researchers to gain a more precise picture of how a drug attacks rhinovirus at the molecular level, and potentially lead to future treatments for other viruses”, Dr. John Wagner, Manager, IBM Research Collaboratory for Life Sciences in Melboune wrote in a blog post today. [...]


Posted by: IBM supercomputer is used to wage war on the common cold | VentureBeat
 
Post a Comment