Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
Archive for September, 2012
September 28th, 2012
14:48
 

Naomi Gross, Associate Professor & Assistant Chairperson, Fashion Institute of Technology

By Naomi Gross

For the past 13 years, I’ve been teaching Fashion Merchandising Management (FMM) at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Prior to teaching, I worked in retail for nearly 15 years. Throughout my career as both a professional and professor, I have watched both the retail industry and retail-focused academic curriculums change drastically, but never more so than in the past few years

Last February an article on Big Data appeared in The New York Times equating knowledge of analytics with job opportunities. This month, the Harvard Business Review is running a cover story on big data. Earlier this week, I received an invitation from my alma mater, Oberlin College, to support curricular innovation to “integrate quantitative analysis and data-informed reasoning into all majors and programs.” And just yesterday at the Fashion Institute of Technology, I presented a case study on Big Data to faculty. Coincidence? I don’t think so.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
September 28th, 2012
0:10
 

Deborah Magid, Director, Software Strategy, IBM Venture Capital Group

By Deborah Magid

When people think of the hotbeds for interesting startups, they usually think of Silicon Valley first. That’s where I’m from and where I handle venture capital and entrepreneur relationships for IBM Software Group. And it’s true, there are lots of cool startups here.

But guess where else they are – everywhere. That’s because governments at the national, state and city levels all over the world are recognizing that venture investment is a form of economic development that creates skilled jobs and commerce. And institutions around the globe are working hard to attract that investment. More than anything, that means creating a wonderful environment for entrepreneurs to live and work.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
September 27th, 2012
9:00
 

By Jill Puleri, Global Retail Leader, IBM Global Business Services

The retail industry has vastly changed from the dynamic influences of digital, social and mobile technologies – all within the past three years. While shopping has always been a social sport – it takes little more than a click of a camera phone to share and solicit feedback on a potential purchase from friends and family afar. In fact, it has never been easier for others to influence personal shopping decisions.

Bringing like-minded people and communities together, social media serves as an all-convenient focus group. Friends, family and even strangers (those who comment on online product reviews) freely contribute their opinions about products, preferences and “likes.” I rely on my networks when I am torn about a particular product, or perhaps looking to try something new. Within minutes, I often find clarity from the input of my social universe.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
September 26th, 2012
0:12
 

By Jan Kleindienst, IBM Czech Chief Technologist and R&D Lab Manager in the Czech Republic

With more than 225 indigenous languages, Europe is rich with multi-lingualism, and that’s why the Council of Europe proclaimed today the European Day of Languages. It aims to promote rich linguistic and cultural diversity and encourage lifelong language learning.

However, the interest in languages (and the human language in general) is not only close to the heart of institutions, but also – perhaps somewhat unexpectedly – to the global technology industry.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

By Paul Brody, Global Industry Leader, Electronics at IBM

Even as one business model for consumer electronics dominates, the next one is always taking shape, usually right under our noses.  When the Blackberry arrived in 1999, my boss at the time, the CEO of a start-up, received one, tested it, and gave up using it, wondering why anyone would want constant access to email.  He gave it to me and I loved it.  It had a kind of gee-whiz factor that delighted and surprised users.

I will never forget an email I got once that said “Just swung by your cube…where are you?” from an astonished colleague who I’d been emailing from a taxi.  We take it for granted now, but it was really novel then: anytime anywhere email.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

By Clinton McFadden, IBM X-Force Research and Development

For security officials, the first half of 2012 was marked by intelligence and sophistication – which, when it comes to securing a computer network, are not always positive traits. Yesterday IBM released the results of the X-Force 2012 Mid-Year Trend and Risk Report. The report highlights a sharp increase in browser-related exploits, weaknesses around password security, and growing operational challenges in the adoption mobile “bring your own device (BYOD) programs and policies since last year. In fact, half of all the Chief Information Security Officers interviewed indicated that mobile BYOD security is their greatest near-term technology concern.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

This is part two of a series about Smarter Public Safety.  Read part one here.

By Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier

Just over 20 years ago, Washington, D.C., was known as the “Murder Capital” of the United States. I was a fairly new officer when we were given this title and believe me, it was not something I was proud of and I committed myself to ensuring I did what I could to change that. Fast forward to a year ago and I can’t tell you how proud I was to announce that our homicide rate has dropped to a 50-year low.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

This is part one of a series about Smarter Public Safety.  Read part two here

by Christopher Padilla, Vice President of Government Programs for IBM

If you live in or around Washington, D.C., you have seen first hand how better public safety can help to improve local economies. Once known as the “Murder Capital” of the U.S., the homicide rate has dropped to a 50-year low in our capital city. This kind of dramatic turnaround has helped the city become a focal point for economic growth.  I’d urge you to read Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier’s latest post to the Smarter Planet blog to learn more about what D.C., is doing to curb crime and foster economic growth.

Today, IBM’s Institute of Business Value released a paper on how a smarter approach to managing public safety can jumpstart economic development. This paper outlines how cities can curb crime and foster economic growth.

Every day, local governments are challenged with ensuring they create a safe environment to not only protect the safety of their citizens, but also promote economic growth.

Here are just a few examples of how crime can have an impact on the Gross Domestic Product of certain countries:

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

This is part two of a series on the future of health.  View part one here.

By Ron Gutman Founder & CEO, HealthTap

Imagine a world where you speak a health-related question into your phone and get a doctor’s quick response, a list of relevant doctors in your geographic area (and when they might be free to see you), medical research regarding the topic, and related questions others have asked. All that, in less than a second!

This is an example of the kind of change that is coming to healthcare and the way social collaboration will democratize the availability of health information.

At HealthTap, we’re creating a vast repository of trusted content, contributed from more than 14,000 U.S.-licensed doctors. Here’s how it works: Once a doctor joins the HealthTap community, he or she can answer real user questions, and see how his or her peers address the same issues. Doctors can “Agree” with one another’s answers in a visible way, allowing users and other experts to see what the expert community as a whole thinks about the quality of a certain answer. This peer review impacts the answering doctor’s DocScore (a FICO-like rating that measures a doctor’s credentials, engagement and reputation among other medical professionals).  The DocScore is visible to doctors and users alike, providing an additional measure of confidence in the content that’s created.

Users can also give personal feedback about doctors’ responses by clicking a “Thanks” button next to an answer, letting other users know that they found the information helpful. Unlike doctors, patients cannot “Agree” with doctors’ answers because they don’t have the same depth of medical knowledge required to provide peer reviews. Instead, these transparent mechanisms used to express gratitude help doctors build a relationship with users (and potential new patients), while managing their online reputation, and providing feedback for physicians about the helpfulness of their responses.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share