Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent

Bernard Meyerson, Chief Innovation Officer, IBM

By Bernard Meyerson

It’s amazing when you look back over the 60+ years of the computing revolution and see how far we have come in such a relatively short time. The first electronic programmable computers, built in the 1940s, were essentially really fast electronic calculators. Then came the mainframe, the PC, the Internet and social networking. Today, we’re entering the era of cognitive computing–machines that help us think.

IBM’s Watson marks a turning point.  The former Jeopardy! TV quiz show champ is now reading millions of pages of medical text in preparation for going to work in healthcare. But while Watson can understand all manner of things and learns from its interactions with data and humans, it is just a first step into a new era of computing that’s going to produce machines that are as distinct from today’s computers as those computers are from the mechanical tabulating devices that preceded them. A host of technologies are coming that will help us overcome our limitations and will transform the way we interact with machines and with each other.

One of the most intriguing aspects of this shift is our ability to give machines some of the capabilities of the right side of the human brain. New technologies make it possible for machines to mimic and augment the senses. Today, we see the beginnings of sensing machines in self-parking cars and biometric security–and the future is wide open. This year, we focused the IBM Next 5 in 5, our 2012 forecast of inventions that will change your world in the next five years, on how computers will mimic the senses:

Touch:        You will be able to reach out and touch through your phone
Sight:          A pixel will be worth a thousand words
Hearing:     Computers will hear what matters
Taste:          Digital taste buds will help you to eat healthier
Smell:          Computers will have a sense of smell

Join the Twitter conversation at #ibm5in5. Click here to vote on the coolest predictions, and check back on the blog Dec. 21 for the results.

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These five predictions show how cognitive technologies can improve our lives, and they’re windows into a much bigger landscape –the coming era of cognitive systems. The world is tremendously complex. We face challenges in deciphering everything from the science governing tiny bits of matter to the functioning of the human body to the way cities operate to how weather systems develop. Gradually, over time, computers have helped us understand better how the world works. But, today, a convergence of new technologies is making it possible for people to comprehend things much more deeply than ever before, and, as a result, to make better decisions.

At IBM, we have been talking about these new capabilities for the past four years under the rubric of our Smarter Planet agenda. We believe that the combination of instrumentation, interconnectivity and computing intelligence makes it possible to  manage the natural and human systems of the world more efficiently and effectively. Well, think of the coming era of cognitive systems as the Smarter Planet agenda on steroids.

In the coming years, computers will become even more adept at dealing with complexity. Rather than depending on humans to write software programs that tell them what to do, they will program themselves so they can adapt to changing realities and expectations. They’ll learn by interacting with data in all of its forms–numbers, text, video, etc. And, increasingly, they’ll be designed so they think more like the humans.

Today, if you put a robotic track inspector in a railroad tunnel and equipped it with a video camera, it would not know what to make of an oncoming train. But what if you enabled it to sense things more like  humans do–not just vision from the video camera but the ability to detect the rumble of the train and the whoosh of air? And what if you enabled it to draw inferences from the evidence that it observes, hears and feels? That would be one smart computer–a machine that would be able to get out of the way before the train smashed into it.

IBM Research is taking the lead in producing some of the scientific advances that will enable the big shift to cognitive computing. A team at our lab in San Jose, Calif.,  for instance, is designing a chip that’s based on the architecture of the brain that could become the brains of the railroad robot. The goal is to create a system that analyzes complex data from multiple senses at once, but also dynamically rewires itself as it interacts with its environment–all the while rivaling the brain’s compact size and low energy usage. Our lead researcher on the project, Dharmendra Modha, envisions being able to package the computational power of a human brain in a container the size of a shoe box.

But the point isn’t to replicate human brains. We humans are no slouches when it comes to procreation. And this isn’t about replacing human thinking with machine thinking. Once again; not necessary. Rather, in the era of cognitive systems, humans and machines will collaborate to produce better results–each bringing their own superior skills to the partnership. The machines will be more rational and analytic. We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, morale compass and creativity.

Indeed, in my view, cognitive systems will help us overcome the “bandwidth” limits of the individual human.

–Limits to our ability to deal with complexity. We have difficulty processing large amounts of information that comes at us rapidly. We also have problems understanding the interactions of the elements of large systems–such as all of the moving parts in the global economy. With cognitive computing, we will be able to harvest insights from huge quantities of data, understand complex situations, make accurate predictions about the future, and anticipate the unintended consequences of actions.

–Limits to our expertise. This is especially important when we’re trying to address problems that cut across intellectual and industrial domains. With the help of cognitive systems, we will be able to see the big picture and make better decisions. These systems can learn and tell us things we didn’t even ask for.

–Limits to our objectivity. We all possess biases based on our personal experiences, our egos and emotions, and our intuition about what works and what doesn’t. Cognitive systems can help remove our blinders and make it possible for us to have clearer understandings of the situations we’re in.

–Limits to our senses. We can only take in and make sense of so much stuff. With cognitive systems, computer sensors teamed with analytics engines will vastly extend our ability to gather and process sense-based information.

I don’t believe that cognitive systems will usurp the role of human thinkers. Rather, they’ll make us more capable and more successful–and, hopefully, better stewards of the planet.

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55 Comments
 
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10:27 pm

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Posted by: Business Credit Cards
 
August 8, 2013
10:53 am

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Posted by: Charles Benner
 
August 7, 2013
4:34 pm

Couple of those innovations are already making into our daily life – Android phone and Siri on iOS. Would be really interesting to know if other developments (taste and smell) find really practical uses, but it’s again matter of good marketing skills.


Posted by: Gouriev Marketing
 
August 7, 2013
3:57 pm

I also agree with a previous comment that people have different tastes. I think what makes food tasty is the spices and the ingredients. If you know your spices and your cooking with quality ingredient, the meal would be succulent….without using complicated computer system…


Posted by: All Home Remedies
 
August 7, 2013
1:24 pm

Incredible, we finally come full circle to really overcome our limitations and transform the way we interact with machines and with each other! Will it have a huge impact how we learn and teach? It definitely will help tremendously but human interactions is the key to successful teaching and learning process.Thank you for sharing this information on mimic the senses’ development.


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Posted by: Cash Advance
 
July 25, 2013
5:26 pm

If the last two comments related to me
@ Josie -you have a strong comment. I surf looking for projects on the origin of human intelligence.
 @ Rose – well.. exactly that. I do not like to lie, and I speak a little. The main problem in solving any problem is to realize that the problem is real… Million of programmers do not see beyond fuzzy Logic, ES, neural networks …falsification of falsification.It has nothing to do with thousands processes that are constantly taking place in people’s minds. I have not found they even to mention the low of transitive relation ( a=b=c a=c). There is only one strong IQ in the whole universe. and “it” starting as baby. layer-by-layer.18 years of learning and socialization-by low. to a very demanding person. Elimination of expiration date and problem of storage is danger. Too much responsibility.


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Posted by: Yoshie Parga
 
July 23, 2013
3:06 pm

I watched 17.47 min -
IBM’s Manoj Saxena on What Watson Will Mean for the Future.
So persuasive and so wrong. Quick speaker. The real thing everybody immediately recognize, not waiting for someone else to continue and evaluate. I’m sure that 5 in 5 is now in bigger problems than Watson ever was because there is no “glue” between units.


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Posted by: Lavinia Deniz
 
June 18, 2013
10:47 am

On which part did you think ?


Posted by: re
 
June 11, 2013
11:19 am

Could not have stated it much better myself


Posted by: recipe dog biscuits
 
May 10, 2013
8:05 am

I think that pairing could be just good fun and it will be presented as a important project where someone else should make full sense. I hope that the goal of IBM is much higher. if their aim is human spark, thay should know that for 160 million years, no species of dinosaurs did not begin the process … regardless of the size and quality of individuals. basis is not allowed. only 1 mutation is succeeded but in individuals that are 8 000 000 years specifically designed


Posted by: Toba
 
May 9, 2013
5:57 pm

think a better pairing of man and machine is for machines to add to us senses that we don’t have.


Posted by: Ruth Malone
 
May 9, 2013
8:54 am

It will be another “Jeopardy” – nobody’s fault… Connect all 5 in one unit is not work for developers and teams who have been trained for one type of problem solving. They are just contractors. Architecture is a job for one man-to create a basis on which can plug-in everything.


Posted by: Toba
 
January 13, 2013
2:06 pm

The ego of our species is astounding. Our ultimate goal is to create machines that are more like us? Why define the future in terms of what already exists, in us? I think a better pairing of man and machine is for machines to add to us senses that we don’t have.

52 years later, the best we can do is the Turing Test.


Posted by: Ed Terpening
 
January 9, 2013
5:28 am

IBM 5 in 5 de anul acesta explorează inovaţii care vor reprezenta bazele următoarei ere de calcul, pe care IBM o descrie ca fiind epoca sistemelor cognitive. Această nouă generaţie de maşini va învăţa, se va adapta, va simţi şi va începe să experimenteze lumea exact cum este în realitate. Predicţiile de anul acesta se concentrează cu precădere pe un element al noii ere: abiliatea computerelor de a imita simţurile umane – în stilul propriu, pentru a vedea, mirosi, atinge, gusta şi auzi. [...]


Posted by: Krishna Gopal Roy
 
December 21, 2012
8:06 am

The article suggests “We have difficulty processing large amounts of information that comes at us rapidly.” This needs qualification. We have difficulty processing large amounts of information presented to us as a block of numerical or language data. I’d like to suggest that much of the problem there is not the processing but the interface. There are plenty of issues with software systems revolving around their import/export functions rather than actual processing.
The flaw in the generalisation can be appreciated if we consider a couple of examples. I can spot my wife in a crowd by identifying just (for eg.) the top of her head. Somehow I have analysed and dismissed vast amounts of irrelevant visual data to filter out the small block of data that I need. Also consider a ski-racer in a Grand Slalom, hurtling down the hill at 80 miles an hour or so he/she is micro- and macro-adapting legs and body to the terrain constantly whilst also adjusting direction to stay on the course. We know it’s difficult because they occasionally hit the physical version of Blue Screen of Death.


Posted by: C Tiney
 
December 20, 2012
1:10 am

I’d like to suggest that a computer modelling a sense of smell is not experiencing olfaction. No-one in IBM can support that claim. Nor can they support a claim that a computational model of cognition is actually an instance of cognition. Nor can they support a claim that the experience of olfaction can be ommitted from accurate cognition involving olfaction.

IBM sell computers. As such they are limited to what computation can achieve. Presupposing they can achieve something that we only have one example of (a human brain), and which is clearly not a computer, seems a continutation of the hubris of the last 60 years.

I predict the IBM attempt to deliver human-level cognition with computing will fail to be an instance of cognition, and will underperform and be just as fragile as all previous projects have. It doesn’t mean the products will not be useful. It means that the products will not be instances of cognition as it exists in humans.

NOTE: This does not mean that machines will never have cognition! I am saying that the machines that do it will not be computers.


Posted by: Colin G. Hales
 
December 19, 2012
10:02 pm

I’m sorry but I am not excited. There are more humans than we need doing all this effortlessly. Why would we need something that consumes electricity staining an already collapsing system? Don’t we first need computers that can live off renewable energy without large infrastructure converting it for them and also dissolve into thin air when they “die”? Can there be “critical” computer systems that do not need 24 hour people shifts to maintain them?


Posted by: Vikram Verma
 
December 19, 2012
2:10 pm

Predicting how technology will impact our culture is a difficult task. We are limited by our current perceptions, but those fall away as times progress. New perceptions, “truths,” and baseline assumptions replace our current paradigm. Our view of the world is through an ever-changing portal. Devices in shows like StarTrek (handheld communicators, being able to see details of a planet’s surface from space, etc)were amazing and unnerving back then, but now are now common place with our cell phones and satellite imagery. Today’s prediction of computers being collaborative with, or more likely integrated in a human being is scary and echoes the sci-fi thrillers of HAL, Colossus, and Robots taking over the world. As a child of the 60′s & 70′s, it is a scary proposition. But in reality, we see it more and more each day; pacemakers in our bodies to preserve our lives, blue tooth devices plugged into our ears, entire libraries at our fingertips, micro chips planted into our pets. We scoffed at the databases of all knowledge that was predicted as part of the computer take-over in the scifi, yet today we simply go to Wikipedia and internet for answers.

The path of the singularity is clear, it is simply a question of how quickly our civilization will progress to adopt. And will we be part of that change, or resist that change.


Posted by: Tim Rose
 
December 19, 2012
10:07 am

I am looking forward the cognitive system.


Posted by: WeiHua
 
December 19, 2012
6:56 am

quite scary actually…Humans themselves can’t be improved and learn how to control their own basic animalistic instincts, let alone create more “human” like and intelligent machines.

If machines will one day learn all human features I hope to be dead when it happens.
Imagine…greedy, selfish, violent evil machines.

I hope it never happens.


Posted by: Marcus
 
December 19, 2012
3:52 am

Could be interesting to see the 5 in 5 of early 2008. If I’m not mistaken, at that time we were speaking of automatic language translation : for example, in an international phone call, a question asked by an American speaker was supposed to be immediately perceived in Turkish by an employee or customer in Turkey. Where do we stand in that area ?


Posted by: JJB
 
December 19, 2012
2:19 am

This is super exciting – indeed an appropriate challenge to take on after the Watson cognitive system – and I do think we all will have a big challenge to see all these 5 senses coming true in the next 5 years, but at the same time, some of them are already there, specifically the seeing – anyway, this is the research that makes the backbone of IBM that I am very proud of – keep pushing Bernie!!


Posted by: Tom Rojahn
 
December 19, 2012
12:38 am

I think as a self assessment exercise IBM should begin reviewing past “5 in 5″ that are now older than 5 years and see how many of their great predictions have come true. So many including the current ones are very very much in the fantasy land. Six years ago out mobile phones will be reading our mind – come on. Flying cars next I guess.


Posted by: darren
 
December 18, 2012
10:33 am

Hope it can suggest home remedies based on the particular situation.

We can take it next steps; it should also emit sounds, smell, lights to benefit the situation. This can help the sick heal faster by providing soothing and nurturing sounds, smells, light, feelings….


Posted by: Dhar Jattipatti (DJ)
 
December 18, 2012
8:08 am

“The machines will be more rational and analytic. We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, morale compass and creativity”
Morale compass???? Surely you mean ‘moral compass’ although in some instances perhaps there’s a need for a morale compass..


Posted by: Sid
 
December 18, 2012
6:12 am

Cool! more collaboration between humans and systems in computing. The smart phone is already half way with many sensors. Real conginitive computing would be to compute in more than one dimension simultaneously; i.e., to utilize several independent inputs to arrive at a result.
Hope to see a day when systems start estimating / guessing …which are subtle part of computation. We will get more time to continue break our head on the sixth sense – self awareness!


Posted by: Rajan Natesan
 
December 18, 2012
5:28 am

IBM first should change it’s leadership.. it’s suck,

A** Managers who don’t know anyting about business and just go by the LEAN and GDF way without understanding the impact on the vary customers who give business to IBM.

CRAP


Posted by: NVL
 
December 18, 2012
4:24 am

I believe there are technologies in nascent stages for each of these. what will be curious is the ability of these 5 senses to come together in one machine. That cognitive ability will help making significant changes to the way we humans live and interact with the environment around us.


Posted by: Venkata Girish
 
December 18, 2012
3:50 am

This article gives the opportunity to think, if we as humans really think we should develop machines to become more “humans”. I remember Terminator as a very good fantastic movie, but this article seems to be the first step towards that myth. Really scaring…I would not like to be part of a company that is leading to a world managed by machines and not by humans.


Posted by: Enrique
 
December 18, 2012
2:31 am

A machine with a very powerful sensory system has a variety of applications, in fields such as making the perfect wine taster to making accident prevention devices. Way to go IBM.


Posted by: Sagar
 
December 18, 2012
1:25 am

Interesting predictions, though computers having a sense of smell is rather scary. I’d like to know if you’ll be revising your predictions in a few years. Cheers!


Posted by: Elijah
 
December 17, 2012
9:47 pm

there is a saying that technology of information is far in advance compared to technology of energy and material. anyway, information technology is used to promote efficiency and it can’t change the physic world directly. the information technology need to wait for other technologies.

Human learn ability is about how to create connection between nerve cells inside brain and I believe the ultimate result of information technology is a great network that computer formed to reflect the physical world and a continue evolving reaction system. every part of this system like cell in human body can store and process information, can produce energy and have a steady but flexible structure. currently computer devices are in the phase of sensing and creating connection. there is no central decision making part and I would like to think the future computer world will be divided into 2 parts like human brain has left brain and right brain. Right brain in charge of processing image and memory,the left in charge of logic reasoning.


Posted by: Light Sheng
 
December 17, 2012
4:32 pm

Not to rain on the parade … but all these trends together could produce a scary scenario. So, the machine have 5 “senses”, can program itself, and more is coming. Part of this discussion should be about the safeguards. Something as complicated as you describe might be on the threshold of ‘intelligence’ , and just might be able to program itself into something that was not envisioned …


Posted by: Carmi Gazit
 
December 17, 2012
12:17 pm

I watched Watson resolve ambiguous clues, search probable answers, and rank probabilities. What I didn’t see was Watson generate an idea for a new TV program. It would be an interesting experiment to pit a machine with no “limits on objectivity” against a hung-over grad student with a flash of inspiration. Machine learning will have arrived when noise or random mutations can be used to modify objectivity.


Posted by: John Faulhaber
 
December 17, 2012
10:12 am

Many thanks to all for a fascinating, tantalising taste of the future. I am now following the Twitter conversation at #ibm5in5 and would like to vote on the coolest predictions, but the page linked at “Click here …” to vote doesn’t have any option to vote that I can see.


Posted by: Evan Grant
 
December 17, 2012
6:58 am

This was the topic of my Masters Degree in 1993-94 .. it has taken this long for technology to match our interest and dreams, it really sounds remarkable what people are now predicting and the timescales, for a long time I never thought what I learned 20 years ago would actually be close to reality


Posted by: Nick Kirkham
 
December 17, 2012
4:24 am

Firstly, love the caricatures! And many kudos to the teams of researchers and staff involved. It’s this sort of stuff that makes me proud and motivated to work at IBM. Coming from a scientific background, I can’t help but point out some precautionary points of contention… 1) Touch – it is hard enough to ensure accurate product descriptions or medical diagnoses nowadays… Adding this extra layer of complexity to descriptions of touch will need to be bolstered with rigorous controls to ensure accurate representation of touch sensation… Which is further compounded by the different hard/software types that may interpret ‘touch data’ differently, depending which version or model you’re using. 2) Hearing – I know there are many more valuable uses for such technology, but based on the slide show, even for the hearing impaired such technology should only be used to reaffirm or refute a conclusion reached from other more direct evidence. I am very sceptical of the value of using computers to interpret the sounds of your own baby… And I am sure you’re aware that to sense landslides and the like would require much more input than just sound (such as slope gradient, rainfall history, soil composition, land use history, etc.). 3) Taste – again, do ‘we’ really need such technology? Well I guess it depends on how you define ‘we’… And I am interested to know how this technology differs from smell… Is it simply the difference between fluid-borne and airborne compounds? At this stage I see the primary value of such technology in being able to sense toxic or otherwise undesirable compounds, not telling me or my kids what we should or shouldn’t eat. What about culture…? This does not overcome our inbuilt evolutionary preferences… 4) Smell – I have the same concerns as with Taste and Touch really… I couldn’t think of much precautionary advice re. sight. Though I shudder to think of the increased capability to global armed forces that all of these technologies may provide. Hopefully such future technology will be able to outsmart humans’ destructive tendencies.., but then we reach the difficult question of whether humans or computers should be at the ‘global helm’… Based on the closing sentence, our views are aligned in that the better outcome would be a bit of both.


Posted by: Tom
 
101 Trackbacks
 
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10:47 pm

[...] [xxix] Bernard Meyerson. “The IBM Next 5 in 5: Our Forecast of Inventions that Will Change the World Within Five Years.” IBM – A Smarter Planet Blog. December 17, 2012. Accessed December 17, 2012. http://asmarterplanet.com/blog/2012/12/the-ibm-5-in-5-our-2012-forecast-of-inventions-that-will-chan… [...]


Posted by: Top 10 Future Mobile Technologies and Trends | DESTINATION INNOVATION
 
January 13, 2013
7:42 pm

[...] personal taste buds. An outline of the project was presented as part of the company’s annual 5 in 5 list — five inventions that could change the world in five [...]


Posted by: Computer could be your personal chef — Financial Press
 
January 12, 2013
12:34 pm

[...] personal taste buds. An outline of the project was presented as part of the company’s annual 5 in 5 list — five inventions that could change the world in five [...]


Posted by: Free Condoms & Lollipops | Computer could be your personal chef
 
January 12, 2013
10:21 am

[...] personal taste buds. An outline of the project was presented as part of the company’s annual 5 in 5 list — five inventions that could change the world in five [...]


Posted by: Computer could be your personal chef
 
January 11, 2013
9:48 am

[...] in the December 2012 iteration of IBM’s Annual 5 in 5 list is a computer that could someday design recipes customized to a person’s individual taste [...]


Posted by: Friday Fourplay: A $66 Kobe Steak Pizza, In the Future: A PC That’s Also a PC, A Smartfork, and When Tyson Met Bourdain | Flavorful World food and drink blog
 
January 11, 2013
9:44 am

[...] predicts that, in five years, computers will begin to develop all the sense that we have. I’m a little fuzzy on how the “taste” aspect will work, but IBM says it could [...]


Posted by: Tech, the Body and the Warp Drive Weapon | Great Ideas in Science and Technology (GIST)
 
January 10, 2013
10:15 am

[...] y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: EntreCreativos » ¿Está tu negocio preparado para la revolución del marketing móvil?
 
January 9, 2013
12:39 pm

[...] resulta interesante consultar las predicciones de IBM. En esta ocasión marca cinco tendencias para los próximos cinco años muy atractivas: (I) generación de energía eléctrica a través de actividades comunes como andar en bicicleta, [...]


Posted by: Paco Prieto » Tendencias TIC en el 2013
 
January 4, 2013
4:12 am

[...] viene y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: ¿Está tu negocio preparado para la revolución del marketing móvil? – Cherrytel – El blog de la Comunicación.
 
January 3, 2013
10:52 am

[...] viene y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: 2013, otro año de avance hacía la movilidad. #Tendenciasmovilidad « Estrategia, Tecnología (BPM/CRM/SM), Marketing y otras vivencias
 
January 3, 2013
4:02 am

[...] viene y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: Tendencias de 2013: otra vez el año del móvil | Foro Innovacion
 
January 2, 2013
6:04 pm

[...] viene y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: Tendencias de 2013: otra vez el año del móvil | Empresa Paginas Web. Diseño Web PYMES, Empresas y Autónomos
 
January 2, 2013
4:22 pm

[...] y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: Tendencias de 2013: otra vez el año del móvil « DeSiCI
 
January 2, 2013
9:20 am

[...] viene y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: 2013: el año del móvil (de nuevo) | Tecnología mulera
 
January 2, 2013
7:02 am

[...] y los siguientes. En el caso de IBM ya son clásicos lo 5 de 5, que en este año se centra en las computadoras con los cinco sentidos: visión, oído, tacto, sabor y olfato. Gartner también se escapa del año próximo y se va al más allá, sin mojarse demasiado. Y los [...]


Posted by: Tendencias de 2013: otra vez el año del móvil « Juan Jose Lopez Garcia
 
December 31, 2012
12:01 pm

[...] just released their annual “Five in Five” year-end predictions, in which they name five crazy-sounding technologies that will be ordinary in five [...]


Posted by: Guess When These 20 Sci-Fi Technologies Are Coming To Your Phone Or PCInnovation
 
December 28, 2012
11:47 am

[...] cambio será posible en unos cinco años según informa Mashable. IBM ha publicado su lista «5 in 5» (Cinco en cinco, dónde el fabricante de hardware, predice las cinco tendencias en computación que llegarán en cinco años. En esta ocasión cinco [...]


Posted by: Redes andaluzas de FP » Computación cognitiva
 
December 28, 2012
10:25 am

[...] This year’s IBM 5 in 5 explores innovations that will be the underpinnings of the next era of computing, which IBM describes as the era of cognitive systems. This new generation of machines will learn, adapt, sense and begin to experience the world as it really is. This year’s predictions focus on one element of the new era, the ability of computers to mimic the human senses—in their own way, to see, smell, touch, taste and hear. [...]


Posted by: 5 Innovations That Will Change Our Lives Within Five Years « MrYoungScholar
 
December 27, 2012
2:03 pm

[...] IBM’s 5 in 5 for example. They provide a short introduction into how machine perception will develop over the [...]


Posted by: Cognitive Design » Blog Archive » Machine Perception and Cognitive Design
 
December 25, 2012
11:09 am

[...] IBM reckons we’ll be able to reach out and touch through our phones; computers will ‘hear’ what matters (filter, in other words); digital taste buds will help us eat healthier and computers will get senses of smell. But whether that means they’ll be able to tell you what new products stink, I don’t know – I imagine they will be too partisan in their programming for that, concentrating on approved devices for our delectation and, more importantly, for our dollars. [...]


Posted by: Predictions for 2013 and beyond
 
December 24, 2012
11:51 am

[...] IBM reckons we’ll be means to strech out and reason by a phones; computers will ‘hear’ what matters (filter, in other words); digital ambience buds will assistance us eat healthier and computers will get senses of smell. But either that means they’ll be means to tell we what new products stink, we don’t know – we suppose they will be too narrow-minded in their programming for that, concentrating on authorized inclination for a ecstasy and, some-more importantly, for a dollars. [...]


Posted by: Mac Planet: Predictions for 2013 and beyond | Apple Product News
 
December 24, 2012
8:56 am

[...] Meyerson日前发表一篇文章,介绍了IBM的“Next 5 in [...]


Posted by: 机器将如何帮助我们思考:IBM预测未来5年5大发明
 
December 24, 2012
3:46 am

[...] словом, прогноз The Five in Five составлялся специалистами IBM на основе уже имеющихся [...]


Posted by: Блог Imena.UA » «Очеловечивание» компьютеров. Уже скоро
 
December 21, 2012
1:00 pm

[...] five years, will increasingly mimic touch, sight, hearing, taste, and smell.” Quoting from a blog post by IBM’s chief innovation officer Bernard Meyerson predicting five inventions that will change the world in five years, Kolakowski reports: [...]


Posted by: Strata Week: Big data’s big future - Strata
 
December 20, 2012
9:58 pm

[...] Meyerson日前发表一篇文章,介绍了IBM的“Next 5 in [...]


Posted by: 机器将如何帮助我们思考:IBM预测未来5年5大发明 | 云动态
 
December 20, 2012
9:25 pm

[...] 2006年から始まったIBMの未来予測 Next 5 in 5。今年も「Next 5 in 5」の2012年版が発表されました。こちらは、今後5年間で私たちの生活を一変させる5つのイノベーションを紹介するもの。今年は非常に興味深い発表でした。 [...]


Posted by: IBMの未来予測。今後5年間で私たちの生活を一変させる5つのイノベーション | Social Design News【ソーシャル・デザイン 公式サイト】
 
December 20, 2012
9:11 pm

[...] Bernard Meyerson, the company’s chief innovation office, told Mashable. (Mashable)(PC Mag)(IBM – Building a Smarter Planet Blog)   Blogtype podcast By CS Newsfeed 1 View, 0 Comments Flag Please [...]


Posted by: IBM: Computing Moves to Cognitive Technologies within Five Years - Computing Now | Newsfeed - IEEECS
 
December 20, 2012
8:02 pm

[...] Meyerson日前发表一篇文章,介绍了IBM的“Next 5 in [...]


Posted by: IBM:未来5年将是一个关于5种感官的智能世界! - PingWest
 
December 20, 2012
12:35 pm

[...] IBM 5 in 5 de anul acesta explorează inovaţii care vor reprezenta bazele următoarei ere de calcul, pe care IBM o descrie ca fiind epoca sistemelor cognitive. Această nouă generaţie de maşini va învăţa, se va adapta, va simţi şi va începe să experimenteze lumea exact cum este în realitate. Predicţiile de anul acesta se concentrează cu precădere pe un element al noii ere: abiliatea computerelor de a imita simţurile umane – în stilul propriu, pentru a vedea, mirosi, atinge, gusta şi auzi. [...]


Posted by: IT Trends » Blog Archive » IBM prezintă cinci inovaţii care ne vor schimba vieţile în următorii cinci ani
 
December 20, 2012
12:21 pm

[...] IBM 5 in 5 de anul acesta explorează inovaţii care vor reprezenta bazele următoarei ere de calcul, pe care IBM o descrie ca fiind epoca sistemelor cognitive. Această nouă generaţie de maşini va învăţa, se va adapta, va simţi şi va începe să experimenteze lumea exact cum este în realitate. Predicţiile de anul acesta se concentrează cu precădere pe un element al noii ere: abiliatea computerelor de a imita simţurile umane – în stilul propriu, pentru a vedea, mirosi, atinge, gusta şi auzi. [...]


Posted by: IBM prezintă cinci inovaţii care ne vor schimba vieţile în următorii cinci ani | ITChannel
 
December 20, 2012
10:11 am

[...] 聪明人会把IBM看做最史上聪明的公司之一,因此它所发布的定期报告 “未来五年的五个革新”是值得我们关注的。报告里描绘了未来五年世界的创新图景。 [...]


Posted by: IBM展望五年后的未来:一个更灵敏、感官、智能的世界 | Fast Company - 阅趣-阅读的乐趣
 
December 19, 2012
11:27 pm

[...] from IBM’s R&D labs around the world that can make these transformations possible. This year’s IBM 5 in 5 explores innovations that will be the underpinnings of the next era of computing, which IBM [...]


Posted by: Future Macs may see, hear and smell
 
December 19, 2012
6:27 pm

[...] lifelike using the five senses we take for granted are quite exciting. The company's full report is here, but here are five examples of innovative, some potentially life-changing, things it says we'll be [...]


Posted by: Innovation Generation - Sarah Reedy - Ideas Watch: The 2013 Predictions Edition
 
December 19, 2012
5:09 pm

[...] be more rational and analytic,” Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. “We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses | Pintercast
 
December 19, 2012
4:20 pm

[...] cég Smarter Planet nevű oldalán pedig már arról írnak az öt érzékszervet érintő jóslatok kapcsán az IBM szakemberei, hogy egy egyszerűbb, vasúti [...]


Posted by: Szagolni is a gép fog helyettünk | Weball Magyarország
 
December 19, 2012
2:41 pm

[...] Read more about these future predictions @asmarterplanet.com [...]


Posted by: IBM Predicts Which Inventions Will Change The World In Five Years
 
December 19, 2012
1:39 pm

[...] technology will make our lives better within the next five years. We've taken the information that IBM presents and collected it down below, as well as our take on what technology could make these predictions [...]


Posted by: 5 things IBM thinks will change the world in the next 5 years - Stormfront
 
December 19, 2012
12:15 pm

[...] il nostro universo. Ed è da qui che prende corpo la ricerca di Big Blue, riferita al settimo IBM5in5 (#ibm5in5), gioco che non è neppure troppo sfizioso ma, in un certo senso, molto più attuale [...]


Posted by: IBM 5in5: computer con tatto, gusto, vista, udito e olfattoPionero
 
December 19, 2012
10:56 am

[...] IT はどのようなものとなっているだろう?」これが IBM によるレポート「The IBM Next Five in Five(次の5年間に実現する5つのイノベーション)」のテーマだ2012年12月17日にリリースされた最新の Five in Five [...]


Posted by: IBM による5つの未来予測:5年後のコンピューターは「匂い」「味」「触感」に対する認識能力が向上する | Today Tops
 
December 19, 2012
9:24 am

[...] Leggi il commento di Bernard Meyerson, Chief Innovation Officer di IBM Share This:TweetFacebookStumbleUponDiggDelicious Filed in: Dal Mondo, Social Media, Strategie, [...]


Posted by: I 5 sensi modificheranno il retail. | Yes Well Done!
 
December 19, 2012
8:39 am

[...] é a previsão da IBM, que lançou a sétima edição do IBM 5 in 5, lista anual que mostra cinco inovações que terão potencial para mudar a forma como as pessoas [...]


Posted by: Matéria Incógnita – Inovação e Criatividade » Em 5 anos computadores vão imitar os 5 sentidos humanos
 
December 19, 2012
8:01 am
December 19, 2012
7:13 am

[...] está mal. Te dejamos con un repaso en vídeo a este ’5 in 5?, ciencia ficción con [...]


Posted by: IBM 5 in 5
 
December 19, 2012
7:11 am

[...] jedes Jahr veröffentlicht IBM die so genannten five in five und trägt damit meist recht weitreichende Utopien für die IT in die Welt. Demnach werden Computer [...]


Posted by: IBM will Computer schmecken lassen -silicon.de
 
December 19, 2012
4:59 am

[...] que ces systèmes seront une réalité d’ici 5 ans. IBM vient de diffuser son dossier “5 sur 5“ annuel, “une prévision des cinq innovations qui vont bouleverser vos vies, votre [...]


Posted by: Le blog du Comptoir des savoirs » Blog Archive
 
December 19, 2012
4:22 am

[...] cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touchFiled under: AltCommentsSource: A Smarter Planet This entry was posted in News by Engadget. Bookmark the [...]


Posted by: IBM’s 5 in 5 predicts cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touch | AIVAnet
 
December 19, 2012
3:36 am
December 19, 2012
12:54 am

[...] will be more rational and analytic,” Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. “We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses
 
December 18, 2012
6:12 pm

[...] the end of each year, IBM Research lists “innovations that will change our lives in the next five years.” This year’s “IBM 5 in 5” is particularly intriguing in that their [...]


Posted by: Within five years, IBM’s smartphone will hear, see, smell, taste, and feel
 
December 18, 2012
5:22 pm

[...] godina je prava vječnost. Većina nas se ni ne sjeća 2007.         godine, a IBM predviđa kako će 2018. izgledati naš svijet. Koristeći postojeće    tehnologije, predviđaju u kojem [...]


Posted by: IBM-ova vizija buducnosti » bihac-X.com - Sve na jednom mjestu!
 
December 18, 2012
4:28 pm

[...] 2012 forecast of inventions that will change your world in the next five years; how computers will mimic the senses: [...]


Posted by: IBM’s “Next Five in Five” « tech3Support BLOG
 
December 18, 2012
4:27 pm

[...] orde te scheppen in de chaos om hen heen. Om de complexe wereld als het ware inzichtelijk te maken. Volgens IBM’s CIO Bernard Meyerson komen nu een aantal technologiëen tezamen die het oorspronkelijke Smarter Planet gedachtengoed [...]


Posted by: The Age of Cognitive Computing | Sander Duivestein
 
December 18, 2012
3:17 pm

[...] will be more rational and analytic," Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. "We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses
 
December 18, 2012
3:14 pm

[...] FROM IBM’s Bernard Meyerson, Chief Innovation Officer: The IBM Next 5 in 5, our 2012 forecast of inventions that will change your world in the next five years, on how computers will mimic the senses: [...]


Posted by: School of Thinking » Blog Archive » cognitive computing: 5 in 5
 
December 18, 2012
3:08 pm

[...] This year’s IBM 5 in 5 explores innovations that will be the underpinnings of the next era of computing, which IBM describes as the era of cognitive systems. This new generation of machines will learn, adapt, sense and begin to experience the world as it really is. This year’s predictions focus on one element of the new era, the ability of computers to mimic the human senses—in their own way, to see, smell, touch, taste and hear. [...]


Posted by: IBM: Computers Will See, Hear, Taste, Smell And Touch In 5 Years | News
 
December 18, 2012
3:00 pm

[...] be more rational and analytic,” Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. “We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses « MattsLens
 
December 18, 2012
2:48 pm

[...] be more rational and analytic,” Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. “We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses « notiziario internet
 
December 18, 2012
2:47 pm

[...] be more rational and analytic,” Bernard Meyerson, chief innovation officer at IBM, said in a blog post. “We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, moral compass and [...]


Posted by: IBM’s Cognitive Computing Plans: Giving Smartphones 5 Senses « Gadgetizing
 
December 18, 2012
10:02 am

[...] The IBM Next 5 in 5: Our 2012 forecast of inventions that will change the world within five years — from IBM [...]


Posted by: The IBM 5 in 5: Innovation in the next 5 years
 
December 18, 2012
8:42 am

[...] his prediction of new technology coming to the world, IBM Chief Innovative Officer Bernard Meyerson writes about the rapid change in computer technology in the last 60 years alone, and the adaption from a [...]


Posted by: Cognitive Computer: IBM Researchers Ready for the New Age of Cognitive Computing
 
December 18, 2012
7:57 am

[...] just released their annual “Five in Five” year-end predictions, in which they name five crazy-sounding technologies that will be ordinary in five [...]


Posted by: Guess When These 20 Sci-Fi Technologies Are Coming To Your Phone Or PC (IBM) | Tips for the Unready
 
December 18, 2012
7:42 am

[...] just released their annual “Five in Five” year-end predictions, in which they name five crazy-sounding technologies that will be ordinary in five [...]


Posted by: Guess When These 20 Sci-Fi Technologies Are Coming To Your Phone Or PC (IBM) | cumulusreport.com / nimbusreport.com
 
December 18, 2012
7:17 am

[...] just released their annual “Five in Five” year-end predictions, in which they name five crazy-sounding technologies that will be ordinary in five [...]


Posted by: Guess When These 20 Sci-Fi Technologies Are Coming To Your Phone Or PC (IBM) « Gadgetizing
 
December 18, 2012
7:15 am

[...] just released their annual “Five in Five” year-end predictions, in which they name five crazy-sounding technologies that will be ordinary in five [...]


Posted by: Guess When These 20 Sci-Fi Technologies Are Coming To Your Phone Or PC (IBM) - Daily Small Talk
 
December 18, 2012
4:23 am

[...] yenilikler direktörü (Chief Innovation Officer Türkçesi) Bernard Meyerson imzalı listede yer alan 5 yenilik şu [...]


Posted by: IBM abarttı, 5 yıla kadar bilgisayarların beş duyusu olacak dedi | PC Extra Online
 
December 18, 2012
4:02 am

[...] taken the information that IBM presents and collected it down below, as well as our take on what technology could make these predictions [...]


Posted by: 5 things IBM thinks will change the world in the next 5 years « Xtreamer Magazine
 
December 18, 2012
3:52 am

[...] the latest edition of IBM 5 in 5, the tech giant has listed out 5 key innovations in technology that are set to affect day to day [...]


Posted by: Computers will be able to Touch, Taste, Hear, Smell and See [IBM 5 in 5 2012]
 
December 18, 2012
3:02 am
December 18, 2012
12:06 am

[...] A Smarter Planet Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInStumbleUponPinterest Category: Random Tech [...]


Posted by: IBM’s 5 in 5 predicts cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touch | eMagility :: defining mobile agility
 
December 17, 2012
11:04 pm

[...] taken the information that IBM presents and collected it down below, as well as our take on what technology could make these predictions [...]


Posted by: 5 things IBM thinks will change the world in the next 5 years
 
December 17, 2012
10:08 pm

[...] cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touchFiled under: AltCommentsSource: A Smarter Planet Source: Engadget   « Silent HTPC build is an art pi…   No [...]


Posted by: – IBM’s 5 in 5 predicts cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touch
 
December 17, 2012
8:57 pm

[...] Chief Innovation Officer Bernard Meyerson said: “A host of technologies are coming that will help us overcome our limitations and will [...]


Posted by: Phones that can sense your mood and computers with a sense of smell...IBM's vision of the future | YourGadgetGuide
 
December 17, 2012
7:01 pm

[...] A Smarter Planet This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged engadget, IBM, news, Sci/Tech, video by admin. [...]


Posted by: IBM’s 5 in 5 predicts cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touch | Blog Feeds
 
December 17, 2012
6:25 pm
December 17, 2012
6:19 pm
December 17, 2012
5:19 pm
December 17, 2012
4:49 pm
December 17, 2012
4:37 pm

[...] cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touchFiled under: AltCommentsSource: A Smarter Planet Source: Technology /* [...]


Posted by: IBM's 5 in 5 predicts cognitive computing will complement our senses, virtualize touch - FourTech Plus
 
December 17, 2012
4:36 pm
December 17, 2012
4:35 pm
December 17, 2012
4:35 pm
December 17, 2012
4:30 pm
December 17, 2012
3:10 pm

[...] Meyerson, the chief innovation officer at IBM, wrote a blog post Monday offering his forecast for the five biggest inventions that will change the world over the [...]


Posted by: IBM's 'Five In Five' computing predictions focus on the five senses | Digital Trends
 
December 17, 2012
1:38 pm

[...] czy to z robotycznymi protezami… Dróg możliwego rozwoju jest mnóstwo. Bernard Meyerson z IBM skupił się jednak na urządzeniach kognitywnych, czyli wpływających na nasze procesy poznawcze. W tegorocznym [...]


Posted by: Świat za 5 lat według IBM — maszyny będą widzieć, wąchać i słuchać | IT BLOGIT BLOG
 
December 17, 2012
1:31 pm
December 17, 2012
1:25 pm

[...] czy to z robotycznymi protezami… Dróg możliwego rozwoju jest mnóstwo. Bernard Meyerson z IBM skupił się jednak na urządzeniach kognitywnych, czyli wpływających na nasze procesy poznawcze. W tegorocznym [...]


Posted by: Świat za 5 lat według IBM | IT BLOGIT BLOG
 
December 17, 2012
3:34 am

[...] on here Rate this:Share this:TwitterEmailLinkedInPrintDiggFacebookGoogle +1 Leave a Comment by [...]


Posted by: The IBM next 5 in 5: Our 2012 Forecast of Inventions that will change the World within five years « Storage CH Blog
 
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