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Archive for April, 2013

Mike King, Vice President, Global Education Industry, IBM

Mike King, Vice President, Global Education Industry, IBM

By Mike King

The age of the heavy textbook-filled backpacks and printed syllabi is coming to an end.

It’s self-evident that the higher education marketplace has been transitioning to digital content and collaborative learning programs for years. Up until recently, much of this evolution has been laptop based, but today the landscape is migrating to tablets and mobile devices. In fact, most campuses now assume, and plan for, multiple devices per-user when considering bandwidth needs for campus-wide WiFi access.

But it’s not just colleges and universities. K-12 schools are moving quickly to digital learning delivery programs, as well, due in large part to the increasing adoption of tablets and new programs designed to leverage those systems. In the U.S., the Race to the Top Assessment program will essentially mandate online testing for all students by 2015. Many districts are implementing tablet programs before then. Los Angeles Unified has announced a tablet program for “one to one” computing (ratio of device to student), and many other major districts, including New York City, Houston, and Gwinnett County, Ga., have similar projects in the works. Continue Reading »

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Gary Swale, Director of Knowledge Dimension, an IBM Business Partner

Gary Swale, Director, Knowledge Dimension, an IBM Business Partner

By Gary Swale and Sandy Carter

Small businesses can no longer ignore the impact of going social.     

In fact, more than 6.1 million South Africans are on Facebook with 100,000 new members registering each month, generating 800 million updates every day.

While large corporations all over the world are leading their countries forward with rapid innovation and expansion, small businesses are playing a vital role in grassroots economic development. Small businesses provide a platform for wider employment and economic opportunity at the local level and, like the small stores and vendors supporting the large anchor store in a mall, the local support larger corporations need to function.

South Africa’s small businesses are no different. Continue Reading »

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Rick Padinha, GM, IBM Global Operations and Delivery Excellence

Rick Padinha, GM, IBM Global Operations and Delivery Excellence

By Rick Padinha

I’m one of those people who bleed IBM blue. I started working for the company in 1969 at the office in Huntsville, Ala., where we supported NASA, the US National Aeronautics and Space Agency. I have held many IBM jobs since then, but, from my point of view, the the central theme of my career and the core reason for IBM’s success today are both rooted in the work we did for NASA in the 1960s and beyond.
For NASA, we designed and built some of the key components of space exploration programs spanning from the early unmanned launches through the trips to the Moon and, ultimately, the Space Shuttle. But, even more importantly, we also helped pioneer the science of systems integration. That’s the process of understanding a big problem or task and bringing together a wide variety of expertise and technology to create a masterful solution to solve a customer’s business problem. Continue Reading »

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Lisa Seacat DeLuca, Software Engineer, Advanced Cloud Solutions; IBM Master Inventor

Lisa Seacat DeLuca, Software Engineer, Advanced Cloud Solutions; IBM Master Inventor

By Chris Nay

FYpacW4XW
ZYVW4Vpac
FFpacD3TW
ZYVWMVT
FYTW4XC
YFpacW4XW
pacFpacV5TW

Notice a pattern in these codes? Don’t feel bad if you don’t. They’re from 1994’s “Pac Man 2: The New Adventures.” The kids playing the game in the mid-1990s knew that they unlocked hidden levels, but probably didn’t notice a pattern either. But 12 year old Lisa DeLuca did. To the point she could correctly predict, and enter the next code without playing the game.

“Figuring out these codes made me think: I want to be around this kind of thing [when I grow up],” Lisa said.

What that “thing” turned into almost 20 years later is programming and patenting at IBM. Today, Lisa is a two-time Master Inventor with more than 300 patents filed, working on next-gen cloud applications for IBM’s Advanced Cloud Solutions. Continue Reading »

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Christian Bieck, IBM Institute for Business Value, Insurance Leader

Christian Bieck, IBM Institute for Business Value, Insurance Leader

By Christian Bieck

The most urgent and strategic initiative that I currently discuss with insurers is that of “Customer Centricity.” That’s because a lot of insurers are having a hard time understanding their customers, many of whom are becoming multi-modal.

A multi-modal customer is one who interacts with a provider through a variety of modes – or interaction points – i.e., face-to-face, phone, websites or aggregators. Often, a multi-modal customer will not purchase a product or service from the interaction point they used to collect information and gather a quote.

Finding success in today’s environment means that insurers must present the right data, information and offers to the right customers, at the right time, and through the right interaction points – many of which are digital.

(Fourth in a series in support of Big Data Week.) Continue Reading »

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Andy Sanford-Clark, IBM Master Inventor

Andy Stanford-Clark, IBM Master Inventor

Andy Stanford-Clark, an IBM Master Inventor who lives in the United Kingdom, jokes that his goal was “world domination” in 1999 when he and Arlen Nipper of Eurotech invented a protocol aimed at greatly improving machine-to-machine communications. This was at the time when another British technology pioneer, Kevin Ashton, coined the term “Internet of Things” to describe how the Internet could be connected to the physical world via a vast network of sensors. Stanford-Clark believed that his protocol, now called MQ Telemetry Transport, or MQTT for short, would enable organizations to quickly and affordably gather, integrate and make use of all of that sensor data. It would be an essential underlying technology for the Internet of Things. Continue Reading »

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David McQueeney, Vice President, Technical Strategy and Worldwide Operations, IBM

David McQueeney, Vice President, Technical Strategy and Worldwide Operations, IBM

By David McQueeney

Five years ago, IBM launched its Smarter Planet initiative, describing the era in which we currently live and operate in as the “Era of Smart,” one marked by forward-thinking leaders in business, government and society capitalizing on smarter systems to achieve economic growth, operational efficiency and sustainable development.

Since 2008, we have moved beyond the world of programmable systems to our first steps in cognitive systems – systems that exploit large data sources and can “learn.” Our Watson system may highlight this new way of operating best. For the first time, a computer has the ability to consult a broad range of human language resources, learn from historical training data, and answer surprisingly complex questions. We are forced to rethink how computers can work with humans on complex tasks, by showing the world a system that is able to respond based on what it ‘knows’ –  facts and information and training – rather than simply what words match in a simple search.

(Third in a series in support of Big Data Week.) Continue Reading »

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T. Ravichandran, Associate Dean for Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lally School of Management and Technology

T. Ravichandran, Associate Dean for Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lally School of Management and Technology

By T. Ravichandran

Ask anyone in academia about launching a new graduate program and you’ll quickly learn it is no easy task.

Foremost among the challenges faced is the need to develop a consensus within the campus community. It’s crucial to make the case to the administration, deans, faculty and other stakeholders that the degree you seek to launch is necessary, that there’s a strong demand for the subject matter it teaches, and – most importantly – that the program will empower today‘s students with the skills needed to obtain jobs upon graduation.

This week, I am happy to say that my school, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has developed a strong consensus for a new Master’s level program in Business Analytics that will launch in September 2013.

(Second in a series in support of Big Data Week.) Continue Reading »

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April 23rd, 2013
3:30
 

Timothy J. Wholey, Global Leader, Aerospace & Defense Industry, IBM Global Business Services

Timothy J. Wholey, Global Leader, Aerospace & Defense Industry, IBM Global Business Services

By Timothy J. Wholey

We live in a world that’s exploding with data. From smartphones and social networks, to airplane instrumentation and atmospheric readings, we capture more data, more quickly than ever before. It’s estimated that 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are generated on the planet every day.

This incredible amount of data creates challenges and opportunities for organizations, particularly in the aviation industry, because of the volume and variety of data it generates. Air traffic demand is expected to triple over the next 20 years, with passenger aircraft and fleets doubling during that time.

(First in a series in support of Big Data Week) Continue Reading »

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Craig Sowell, Vice President, IBM SmartCloud and Managed Services Marketing

Craig Sowell, Vice President, IBM SmartCloud and Managed Services Marketing

By Craig Sowell

As we come to recognize the power of mobile, social and Big Data to deliver new forms of innovation and drive growth, a common, unifying element is the cloud.

Cloud computing is changing the way we live and do business. From how we enjoy music and movies to how we speed our transportation. Just look at how cloud is enabling innovation for Drivewyze, a company that provides a service for truckers that is comparable to the E-ZPass electronic toll-collection system available in 14 states from Indiana to Massachusetts.

But instead of speeding up congestion at tollbooths, Drivewyze enables truckers to avoid lengthy stops at the weigh stations where commercial truckers are required to check in. What makes this possible is enabling tablets, smartphones, or other in-cab devices with transponder-like functionality provided by the cloud.  Continue Reading »

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