Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
Archive for August, 2013

Chris Sciacca, Communications Manager, IBM Research - Zurich

Chris Sciacca, Communications Manager, IBM Research – Zurich

By Chris Sciacca

IBM researcher Ton Engbersen believes scientists very soon will be able to build a computer that is comparable in complexity to the human brain. But that is only half the story. He also wants to teach such a machine to learn like the brain as well. And that is where it gets really interesting.

Ton is referring to cognitive computing – the ability of machines to sense, reason, learn, and, in some ways, think. Learning is a key element. These computers will not be based on programs that predetermine every answer or action needed to perform a task; rather, they will be trained with algorithms and through interactions with data and humans. Continue Reading »

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Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

By Steve Hamm

Cloud computing seems like a natural fit for the developing world. In places where capital for major information technology purchases can be difficult to round up, this approach to computing makes it possible for small business owners, start-up entrepreneurs, social service non-profits and universities to share resources and buy computing services more affordably, by the drink. So far, though, while cloud computing is taking off in mature economies, adoption is lagging in less developed ones. Continue Reading »

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Brian O'Connell, Software Engineer, Master Inventor, IBM

Brian O’Connell, Software Engineer, Master Inventor, IBM

By Andrew Nichols, IBM Communications

As the 2013 US Open Tennis Championships kicks off in Flushing, N.Y., this week, tennis fans around the world will turn to USOpen.org for scoring, live streaming video and real-time analytics. Whether they know it or not, those fans will be counting on cloud computing and predictive analytics technologies to provide the continuous and reliable access to stats, scores, videos and match insights.
 
Brian O’Connell, a software engineer and Master Inventor at IBM, leads the cloud infrastructure team in Raleigh, N.C., that creates the solutions that power sporting events like the US Open. Continue Reading »

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August 27th, 2013
11:00
 

Martin Fleming, , Vice President, Business Performance Services, Chief Economist, IBM

Martin Fleming, Vice President, Business Performance Services, Chief Economist, IBM

By Martin Fleming

In a recent New York Times article, reporter James Glanz asks: “Is Big Data an Economic Dud?” Mr. Glanz seems to answer his own question skeptically. The “data era,” he suggests, will not match the earlier revolutions in manufacturing, domestic life and transportation.

In addition, the Wall Street Journal posted a blog discussing that Big Data is at, or near the peak of the Gartner “hype cycle” and “big data technologies are now soon to be due for a fall into the ‘trough of disillusionment.’” Continue Reading »

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Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

By Steve Hamm

As the most-attended sporting event to be staged worldwide each year, the US Open Tennis Championships in New York City is an ultra-high-profile venue for demonstrating IBM’s technology chops. Each year since the company became the United States Tennis Association’s technology sponsor in 1990, IBM tech teams have endeavored to outdo the advances they produced the year before. You can see their work as the up-to-date expression each year of what it takes to run a big sports event with the latest technology available. This year is no exception. Cloud computing really came into its own. Continue Reading »

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Keith J. Figlioli, Senior Vice President, healthcare informatics, Premier Healthcare Alliance

Keith J. Figlioli, Senior Vice President, healthcare informatics, Premier healthcare alliance

By Keith J. Figlioli

From banking to air travel, the evolution of technology has made connecting information seamless and almost limitless for many people and industries today. But not in healthcare. At least, not yet.

Healthcare is rapidly moving to become more connected and accountable, but its technology isn’t keeping pace. Though they’re an important piece of the puzzle, legacy technology platforms such as electronic medical records (EMRs), address today’s challenges, not tomorrow’s requirements. The majority can’t integrate clinical, financial and operational data across individual hospitals, let alone across health systems or the continuum of care. Continue Reading »

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Kim Stephens, Co-author, Your Journey to Executive: Insights from IBM Women Executives; Diversity and Inclusion, IBM

Kim Stephens, Co-author, Your Journey to Executive: Insights from IBM Women Executives; Diversity and Inclusion, IBM

By Kim Stephens

It is no longer enough to recognize the value of women in the workplace, or even to encourage growth. To meet business objectives in the future, organizations of all sizes need to create an environment where women can thrive and build careers, where they have opportunities to stretch their skills and take on visible roles, and where they are encouraged to integrate work and life in a way that works for them.

We need to reach out to women early or mid-career to learn more about potential inhibitors and career development needs and desires. This is how we ensure we build a diverse leadership pipeline for the future. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Jochen Schmidt, Chief Scientist, Environmental Information, NIWA Research, Wellington, NZ

Dr. Jochen Schmidt, Chief Scientist, Environmental Information, NIWA Research, Wellington, New Zealand

By Dr. Jochen Schmidt

New Zealand’s farmers and growers are in constant combat with the country’s variable and often extreme weather.

Many important operational decisions ­– when to fertilize, irrigate, spray or move stock, for example ­– hinge on knowing precisely what the weather is going to do. Extreme events like floods, frosts, snowstorms and droughts can have a devastating effect on productivity and profitability.

So being prepared is key.

Standard public weather forecasts generally fall far short of what farmers and growers need. So at New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) we used our high-resolution forecasting capability to launch a new subscription service called NIWA forecast to generate predictions tailored to their specific needs. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Katharine Frase,  Chief Technology Officer, IBM Global Public Sector

Dr. Katharine Frase,
Chief Technology Officer, IBM Global Public Sector

By Dr. Katharine Frase

The urbanization age is upon us. While the estimates vary of what percentage of population will live in cities by 2020, 2050, or even 2015 for that matter, what remains constant is the undeniable pace of change cities are already facing – change that will only accelerate.

Cities around the world, whether big, mid-size or small, are reaching their limits from growing and aging populations, strained infrastructures and a constant need to do more with less.

To reinvent themselves for the 21st century – “the New Era of Smart” – cities are turning to data. Using and analyzing information in new ways is enabling them to anticipate problems in real time, or better yet, before they happen. In addition, the knowledge and insight is crucial for city officials to make better decisions and swiftly resolve the issues that are most pressing for citizens. Continue Reading »

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Timothy Dalton, Nano-Science & Technology Partnership Program Manager, Master Inventor, IBM

Timothy Dalton, Nano-Science & Technology Partnership Program Manager, Master Inventor, IBM

By Timothy Dalton

Photovoltaic cells (the individual units of a solar panel) have been around since the 1970s. But until now, they have not been cost or energy effective enough for widespread adoption as an energy source. IBM Research’s latest foray into solar technology, a second-generation Ultra High Concentrator Photovoltaic (UHCPV) system, converts 30 percent of the sunlight that hits it to Direct Current – versus the 20 percent efficiency of conventional solar panels.

Gen II Ultra High Concentrator Photovoltaic cells installed at IBM Boulder site.

Gen II Ultra High Concentrator Photovoltaic cells installed at the IBM Boulder site.

Now, what started out as a joint project between IBM Research and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) through the KACST IBM Nanotechnology Center of Excellence has branched to sunny spots in the United States – Boulder, CO, and Tucson, AZ.

IBM’s inspiration to develop these new photovoltaics came from researching silicon technology for CMOS microprocessors after a client posed the question “what can [IBM] do with your technology in the field of renewable energy?” during the 2006 Innovation Jam. Continue Reading »

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