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John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

This week, President Obama issued an executive order establishing the National Strategic Computing Initiative with the goal of ensuring that the United States leads in the field of high-performance computing. The initiative is aimed at producing computers capable of exascale performance–which is one billion billion operations per second, orders of magnitude faster than today’s most powerful computers.

IBM has been a pacesetter in large-scale computing ever since modern computers emerged in the 1940s. We have collaborated with the US government in producing and deploying computers in the national laboratories and government agencies that help the country retain its leadership in science and commerce, as well as safeguarding national security.

We believe it won’t be possible to achieve exascale performance in a way that is affordable and sustainable by following the path that computer scientists have been on for decades. Instead, it’s necessary to develop a bold new approach, which we call data centric computing, which addresses both the modeling and simulation applications that are the traditional focus of the high-performance computing community and today’s new applications in big data analytics and cognitive computing.

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Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

By Kyu Rhee

When it comes to transforming healthcare, IBM started by looking at what we could do for our own employees. More than a decade ago, thought leaders within the company helped shape one of the most important concepts in healthcare today–patient-centered primary care.

That’s the idea that healthcare should be organized around the individual and that all of the organizations and healthcare providers involved should coordinate to deliver truly personalized services addressing everything from promoting healthy lifestyles to treating diseases.

Since then, we’ve been on a steady march to infuse people-centric, relationship-based thinking into every aspect of healthcare and wellness at IBM–and we’re committed to creating technology-based solutions that give organizations and healthcare providers worldwide the tools for improving the health and well-being of their populations. Continue Reading »

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SP John Kelly

John Kelly, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John Kelly III

World leaders from business, government and the non-profit sector are gathering this week in Nairobi, Kenya, for Global Entrepreneur Summit 2015, the first such summit to be held in sub-Saharan Africa. So it’s a good time to explore the potential for Africa and Africans to take advantage of the power of entrepreneurship and innovation to propel the continent forward.

IBM is committed to helping Africa fulfill it’s promise by providing information technologies to help address the continent’s challenges, through research collaborations with companies and universities, and by helping to foster innovation ecosystems in a number of cities. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Hendrik Hamann. Physical Analytics manager, IBM Research

Dr. Hendrik Hamann. manager, Physical Analytics at IBM Research

By Hendrik Hamann

Five years ago, a few of my IBM Research colleagues and I played a hunch. Large-scale solar power was taking off, but we realized that for solar to fulfill its potential for helping to produce a more sustainable energy future, it would have to be integrated into electrical grids. For that to work, you would have to know ahead to time how much solar power would be generated when and where. That realization spawned our solar forecasting research project.

Today, we have shown that we can generate accurate forecasts of solar energy (from minutes ahead to many days ahead), which in turn can have a significant impact on the energy business – and on the future of sustainable energy. Our preliminary findings, including a test conducted at ISO-New England, the grid operator serving Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont, show that our system can be 30 percent more accurate than other state-of-the-art approaches. Continue Reading »

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July 11th, 2015
8:00
 

Roman Vaculin, PhD, IBM Research staff member

Roman Vaculin, PhD, IBM Research staff member

by Roman Vaculin

Want to know how far Novac Djokovic ran in his second-round match against Jarkko Nieminen? IBM’s SlamTracker knows (1,647.9 meters). While SlamTracker keeps up with every bit of on-court action at Wimbledon, this year my team at IBM Research added analysis of what happens online, off the court – even what’s going to happen – as part of the All England Club’s digital experience.

Our analytics, which is part of the Wimbledon Social Command Center, now pulls in social media data and identifies in real-time the most engaging and influential voices around Wimbledon and tennis. And our predictive analytics, using keywords, hashtags, and other online sources, helps us understand the effectiveness and the topics of content fans find most interesting, and also helps the All England Lawn Tennis Club and Wimbledon content creators proactively, and effectively target their online communications. Continue Reading »

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Guru Banavar

Guru Banavar, VP, Cognitive Computing Research

By Guruduth Banavar

With thousands of scientists, engineers, and business leaders focused on cognitive computing across IBM Research and the IBM Watson Group, IBM is pursuing the most comprehensive effort in the tech industry to advance into the new era of computing. Nobody has more people on it, a broader array of research and development projects nor deeper expertise in so many of the most significant fields of inquiry.

Yet we understand that to accelerate progress in cognitive computing, we can’t do this alone. That’s why IBM has been pursuing a strategy of forming deep collaborative partnerships with academic scientists who are among the leaders in their fields as well as opening Watson as a technology platform for others to build on. Continue Reading »

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July 10th, 2015
13:42
 

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science, University of Montreal

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science,
University of Montreal

By Yoshua Bengio

Humans have long dreamed of creating machines that think. More than 100 years before the first programmable computer was built, inventors wondered whether devices made of rods and gears might become intelligent. And when Alan Turing, one of the pioneers of computing in the 1940s, set a goal for computer science, he described a test, later dubbed the Turing Test, which measured a computer’s performance against the behavior of humans.

In the early days of my academic field, artificial intelligence, scientists tackled problems that were difficult for humans but relatively easy for computers–such as large-scale mathematical calculations. In more recent years, we’re taking on tasks that are easy for people to perform but hard to describe to a machine–tasks humans solve “without thinking,” such as recognizing spoken words or faces in a crowd. Continue Reading »

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Rick Relyea, left, director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George; and Harry Kolar, IBM Distinguished Engineer and associate director.

Rick Relyea, left, director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George; and Harry Kolar, IBM Distinguished Engineer and associate director.

By Harry Kolar

New York’s Lake George is a pristine, 32-mile-long lake in the Adirondack Mountains that is noted for its water quality and clarity. While the lake is very clean, it faces multiple anthropogenic threats, including road salt incursion and several invasive species.

The Jefferson Project at Lake George, a joint research collaboration involving Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM Research, and the FUND for Lake George, is focused on protecting the lake and helping address the world’s looming freshwater supply challenges.

The project involves more than 60 scientists around the world (four IBM Research labs are involved), including biologists, computer scientists, physicists, engineers and chemists. Working as a virtual team, we’re pushing the boundaries in Internet-of-Things sensors, data analytics, and modeling of complex natural systems. Continue Reading »

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Wendy Hite, cognitive cooking pioneer

Wendy Hite, cognitive cooking pioneer

By Steve Hamm
Chief Storyteller, IBM

Wendy Hite is a bit of a food snob. She grew up in South West Louisiana, where food and family are all mixed up in the great gumbo of life, and, for the longest time, she couldn’t imagine how she could improve on traditional Cajun-style cooking.

Until she met Chef Watson, that is.

She used the cognitive cooking discovery program to develop a crawfish deviled egg dish that was mighty tasty–familiar, in some ways, but also new to her. “This has been fun,” she says. “It gets you to try new things and to be more creative than you normally would be.” Continue Reading »

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Robert Griffin, General Manager, IBM Safer Planet

Robert Griffin, General Manager, IBM Safer Planet

By Robert Griffin

We live in a dangerous world. You know the threats as well as I do. But we don’t have to live in fear. I’m convinced that technology can help police, corporate security officers, national security agencies and emergency management officials do their jobs better–making people, companies, cities and countries safer.

Situational intelligence is the key to making the world less dangerous. The more we know, the better prepared we are when the worst happens–and the more likely we are to be able to prevent it. To know more, we need to be able to sift through all the evidence to understand what’s happening now, and why, and what’s likely to happen next. Continue Reading »

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