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Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson Group

Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson Group

By Rob High

My hometown of Austin, Texas, is food truck heaven. The city boasts more than 1000 trucks serving up an incredible variety of fare—everything from potato-chip-flavored ice cream sandwiches to Japanese deep fried octopus meatballs. When hordes of technorati and live music fans gather here for the annual South By Southwest (SXSW) festival next week, they’ll have plenty of culinary treats to choose from. But we have something really different to bring to the table — IBM’s Watson food truck.

truck-img-x2You’ve probably watched Watson compete on TV, but now for the first time you can see, taste and smell the results of its creativity.

The bright orange truck will serve up exotic delicacies including Indian Tumeric Paella, Italian Grilled Lobster and Ecuadorian Strawberry Dessert. Unlike the menus of the other trucks, these dishes were created through a collaboration between Watson, a cognitive computer, and award-winning chefs at New York’s Institute of Culinary Education (ICE). Continue Reading »

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February 27th, 2014
17:00
 

Martin Cooper, inventor of the original mobile phone

Martin Cooper, Chairman and co-founder of incubator, Dyna LLC; inventor of the original mobile phone

By Martin Cooper

After decades of existence, the mobile phone is finally beginning to hint at its potential to address some of society’s most important challenges.

As the mobile industry grows out of its vapid obsession with pixels, apps, and bling, recognition of one of the mobile phone’s higher callings is getting attention. This emerging focus on the phone as a device for transferring personalized health information to and from an individual sets society up for revolutionary improvements in healthcare.

Just imagine a society in which diseases, and the pain and suffering they cause, simply do not exist—in which people are healthy until end-of-life. Such a society is within the realm of scientific possibilities, but only if we change our approaches to healthcare. Smarter use of data, enabled by mobile phones, can help as we switch from curing diseases that have already struck to anticipating and preventing the diseases before they strike. Continue Reading »

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Adalio Sanchez, General Manager, IBM x86 and PureSystems Solutions, IBM

Adalio Sanchez, General Manager, IBM x86 and PureSystems Solutions, IBM

By Adalio Sanchez

Forward-thinking academic institutions rely on advanced technology systems to support internal research programs and to improve their own IT operations. Just as importantly, the practical application of these technologies in the academic world plays a critical role in promoting the development and education of students in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Throughout my career as a technologist, I’ve witnessed firsthand how the right technology solutions have the power to foster and advance STEM education and make our education systems smarter – from turning ideas into useful knowledge and practical business technologies that can benefit our economy and society, to filling the employment pipeline with workers equipped with the skills necessary to make them competitive and successful. Continue Reading »

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Stephen Gold, VP, IBM Watson Group

Stephen Gold, VP, IBM Watson Group

By Stephen Gold

Ever since the early days of personal computing, scientists, sci-fi mavens and movie makers have envisioned a time when people would interact with pocket-sized intelligent digital assistants that would help them organize their lives and get things done.

Like flying cars, those intelligent digital assistants always seem to be off in the future.

Except that’s not so anymore. Today, scientists and engineers at IBM are designing cognitive systems that will ingest vast amounts of information, learn, reason, and interact with people in ways that are more natural to us.

Very soon, you’ll have all of the power of Watson, the Jeopardy-winning computer, delivered in the palm of your hand. In fact, some early adopters are already trying out test versions of the technology.

Many people think of Watson as a room-sized supercomputer. Today’s reality is quite different. The computing power of the original Watson has been squeezed into a space the size of three pizza boxes, and, thanks to the cloud, Watson’s intelligence can be accessed on your smart phone or tablet wherever and whenever you want it.

Continue Reading »

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February 26th, 2014
12:45
 

IBM Watson Avatar

IBM Watson Avatar

By Steve Hamm

Tired of fiddling with mobile apps that do little more than entertain people with too much slack time on their hands? Here’s a chance to help change the world. IBM today launched the IBM Watson Mobile Developer Challenge, a first-of-its-kind worldwide competition to promote development of mobile consumer and business apps powered by Watson, a cognitive computing breakthrough.

Cognitive computers are smart machines that ingest vast amounts of information, learn, reason and interact with people in ways that are more natural to us. While the original Watson was trained to compete with humans on the TV quiz show Jeopardy!, today’s Watson is designed to provide advice and insights to business leaders, professionals and individuals anywhere and any time—thanks to cloud and mobile computing.

To learn more about IBM’s Mobile Watson strategy, see IBM CEO Ginni Rometty’s keynote speech today at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.Tweet to #IBMWatson and #MWC14 Continue Reading »

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Andy Daudelin, Vice President, Security Services, AT&T Business Solutions

Andy Daudelin, Vice President, Security Services, AT&T Business Solutions

By Andy Daudelin

Among the 10 most stressful C-Suite roles of 2014 in business today is the role of chief information security officer (CISO). These IT security leaders set the strategy for the way a company protects itself from constantly evolving cyber threats – and they must implement these strategies without disrupting the speed of the business or its ability to innovate.

The threat landscape today is fraught with risk. IBM’s most recent Cyber Security Intelligence Index confirms that the average company faces 1.57 million security events per week, with 1,400 of those identified as actual attacks. And earlier this year, I discussed how new security threats and regulations will make 2014 a critical year for compliance and audit demands, and organizations need to be better prepared.    

Cloud and mobile technologies are an excellent example of the balance CISOs must strike as they strive to protect the IT infrastructure while incorporating emerging technologies. Many companies are finding cloud an ideal platform for emerging business applications and are integrating those cloud-based services with their traditional technology platforms. It’s the CISO’s mission to secure all of this – and its underlying data – as a single seamless service. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Michael Weiner, DO, Director, Healthcare Strategic Solutions, IBM

Dr. Michael Weiner, DO, Director, Healthcare Strategic Solutions, IBM

By Dr. Michael Weiner

It’s been 53 years since IBM created the first electronic health record (EHR) for Akron Children’s Hospital, built on IBM’s Ramac 305. In those days, we could never have dreamed of the advances that would soon unfold for the modern EHR. From the amount of data they collect and store to the ability to access them remotely on mobile devices, EHRs have truly transformed medicine over the past few decades.

EHRs have also begun to transform our healthcare ecosystem. As a physician, I can attest to the value of an EHR to help improve the quality of care we deliver to our patients.

Akron Children’s Hospital, IBM RAMAK 305, 1961.

Akron Children’s Hospital, IBM RAMAK 305, 1961.

EHR’s can also facilitate care coordination between clinicians and help achieve greater administrative efficiencies.But as we look to the future of EHRs and to the requirements of Stage 3 meaningful use in the U.S., we continue to ask ourselves how to integrate structured and unstructured clinical data. Many of us have often wondered: When will the technology be able to read our notes? Continue Reading »

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February 19th, 2014
17:00
 

Manoj Saxena, Managing Director, TEF

Manoj Saxena, Managing Director, TEF

By Manoj Saxena

I’m an entrepreneur at heart. I love to shepherd businesses from concept to reality. Earlier in my career, I launched, built and sold two technology companies.

One of those companies was purchased by IBM, which launched the next phase of my career, when I became an intrepreneur. At IBM I was tapped to lead the team charged with turning Watson from a Jeopardy-playing experiment into a set of technology solutions capable of transforming industries. During our short three year effort, we’ve applied Watson to a variety of industry challenges, from health care to financial services and retail, and demonstrated the power of the new era of computing where cognitive systems think, improve by learning, and discover insights in massive amounts of data. Continue Reading »

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Harry van Dorenmalen, Chairman, IBM Europe

Harry van Dorenmalen, Chairman, IBM Europe

By Harry van Dorenmalen

Societies across the world are reaping huge benefits from the new natural resource that is data. But at the same time that people are experiencing improvements in public safety, health care, flood protection, weather prediction, transport planning or water resource management, politicians around the globe are grappling with how to legislate data.

Here in Europe, the European Commission’s DG Connect has been instrumental in promoting an innovative Digital Economy. SP oddment red fladHowever, rhetoric that is currently emanating from parts of Europe reminds me of this: that in mid-19th century Britain, laws forbade the use of self-propelled vehicles without a person walking in front, waving a red flag to warn pedestrians of a vehicle’s approach and to slow its speed. This dramatic measure hindered early automotive adoption. Continue Reading »

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Rich Schwerdtfeger, CTO Accessibility, IBM Software Group

Rich Schwerdtfeger, CTO Accessibility, IBM Software Group

By Rich Schwerdtfeger

Throughout the history of computing, software has typically advanced more quickly than the hardware on which it runs. But that’s not the case when it comes to documents and mobile devices. All too often, things like PDF documents and HTML pages are laborious to operate on a mobile device or limited in capability. When you consider the widespread and unrelenting proliferation of mobile devices, from smart phones to tablets, the problem was only going to get worse.

EPUB LOGOAt IBM we viewed the challenge as an accessibility issue, one that was preventing consumers from viewing their desired content. So we set out to collaborate to create a solution that would help the literally billions of mobile users access and consume documents easily and without degradation of performance.

When developing an accessibility strategy for software we try to take a holistic view that is heavily dependent on open standards. When we set out on this journey, our two primary documentation formats were XHTML and PDF. Continue Reading »

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