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July 9th, 2014
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Christopher Hansen, President, American Cancer Society, Cancer Action Network

Christopher Hansen, President, American Cancer Society, Cancer Action Network

By Christopher W. Hansen

Technology is changing every aspect of our lives, and in the field of medicine that is especially true in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cancer.

Technology allowed scientists to unravel the human genome and led to the creation of the entirely new science of genomics and personalized medicine. Now we’re able to fight some cancers by using technology to identify genetic mutations and create therapies to cause specific molecular alterations in tumors. We also use apps on smartphones and other personal technological devices connected to broadband networks to monitor our health. Technology enables patient-centered care.

As cancer care continues to evolve, so does medical technology and its use in every aspect of the care continuum. Continue Reading »

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Xiaowei Shen, Dir., IBM Research China

Xiaowei Shen, Dir., IBM Research China

By Xiaowei Shen

China’s economic development story is truly incredible. With an average GDP growth of 10% over the past 30 years, China has emerged as the world’s second-largest economy and largest manufacturer.

But as a nation we realize that for China to sustain rapid growth some things have to change. One of the most central and widely discussed issues is ensuring growth while protecting the environment and the health of our citizens. We understand that our success should not come at the cost of future generations. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, an IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, an IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

By Dr. Guillermo Cecchi

More than 63 million psychiatric interviews are conducted every year. But none of them are analyzed in a quantitative codified manner. Surprising? Not really. Doctors don’t have time to find patterns in the pages of notes they keep per patient. Those pages, though, keep “big data” on psychiatric issues that analytics can help unlock and predict before episodes occur.

Now, after a multi-year study and accompanying development of text analysis algorithms, we may finally be able to quantify patterns in these interviews, and help doctors treat patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other conditions. Continue Reading »

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Steve Abrams, Dir., IBM Watson Life

Steve Abrams, Director, IBM Watson Life

By Steve Abrams

One of my all-time favorite activities is barbequing on my deck (and I mean real barbecue, not grilling). My favorite dish to make is beef brisket, which, if you’ll allow me to be immodest, reaches a pinnacle of perfection after 12 hours in the smoker.

Yep, I love to eat and I love to cook and I love to experiment. I almost never use a recipe exactly as I find it.

That’s why I’m so happy that my group at IBM has joined with Bon Appétit one of the world’s most respected food-media brands, to enhance culinary creativity and discovery with cognitive computing.

Today, Bon Appétit’s editors published a package of stories about a web-based cognitive cooking application that we’re developing, called “Chef Watson with Bon Appétit.” This has evolved from the same technology that we debuted at SXSW in Austin, Texas, a couple of months ago, serving Watson’s culinary creations from a food truck. But now, in collaboration with Bon Appétit, we’re introducing a limited beta of an application built around this technology, tailored to the needs of avid home cooks.

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Matt Gross, editor, BonApetit.com

Matt Gross, editor, BonAppetit.com

By Matt Gross

For nearly 20 years, I’ve observed the South by Southwest festival from afar, fascinated by the list of bands, movies, and tech companies coming every year to Austin, Texas—but frustrated beyond measure that I’ve never been able to go, catch a hot band on its way up, eat late-night migas, and feel like I was on the creative cutting edge. This past February, however, was particularly bittersweet. That’s because SXSW was host to something that seized my attention and wouldn’t let go: a food truck dishing up Austrian chocolate burritos and Belgian bacon pudding, recipes inspired not by an overly tattooed mad kitchen scientist but by Chef Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing system. Continue Reading »

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Toby Lewis, Editor, Global Corporate Venturing

Toby Lewis, Editor, Global Corporate Venturing

By Toby Lewis

IBM made a hugely exciting move in the world of venture capital a few months ago when it committed $100 million in a bid to boost its new IBM Watson Group business unit, which provides cloud services using Watson cognitive computing technology. The goal is to use targeted venture funding to help establish a sprawling ecosystem of companies that build web services and mobile apps on top of the Watson platform.

The strategy is a pioneering move within the field of corporate venturing. Typically corporations invest venture money in companies that are aligned with their technology and strategy. Sometimes they end up buying the companies they invest in. But IBM is pushing the model further than others by using its investments to help establish a new business ecosystem for a particular business unit.

For this reason, Global Corporate Venturing, the only media publication exclusively dedicated to tracking how corporates are investing in venture capital, gave IBM our Fundraising of the Year Award.

Continue Reading »

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Paul Segre, CEO, Genesys

Paul Segre, CEO, Genesys

By Paul Segre

When it comes to customer experience, there is overwhelming evidence that getting it right is great business. It lowers customer effort, increases sales, and creates more loyal customer advocates. At the same time, only one in three companies deliver a positive customer experience today.

That’s one of the reasons that Genesys, a leader in technology solutions for customer experience and contact centers, teamed with IBM to bring the power of Watson to customer service. Together we are developing a learning system that combines the Watson Engagement Advisor with the Genesys Customer Experience Platform to transform how organizations engage with their customers. Companies and organizations can now tap into a virtually unlimited range of information to provide more accurate and complete responses to customer inquiries – within self-service and agent assisted engagements. Continue Reading »

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As cognitive computing advances, it’s becoming obvious that these new capabilities will ultimately touch nearly every aspect of life–augmenting human intelligence and spreading expertise. Watson’s newest focus is on the customer experience.

We have all faced frustrations when we’re trying to find just the right product or service, comparison shop or get something fixed or updated. We want personalized attention and quick and easy answers to our questions. A newly announced alliance of IBM and Genesys, a leading provider of customer experience and contact center solutions, aims to help companies serve their customers better. Here’s a scenario explaining how the services will work:

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FangBy Steve Hamm
IBM Writer

Fang, a cute plush toy who is much smarter than your average (stuffed) bear, is not something that IBM Watson Group had on its drawing boards. But the creative geniuses at a New York City startup, Majestyk Apps, dreamed up this novel way of using the power of Watson to delight and teach children.

Majestyk was one of three winners of the IBM Watson Mobile Developer Challenge, who were announced today. The others were GenieMD, of Pleasanton, Calif., a maker of mobile personal healthcare apps; and Red Ant, of London, England, a a provider of mobile technology for the retailing industry. Continue Reading »

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IBM_Watson_AvatarThe era of cognitive computing is upon us. Scientists and engineers are designing new systems that ingest vast amounts of information, learn from their interactions with people and data, reason, and help us make better decisions. The opportunities are vast, but so are the challenges. That’s why fulfilling the promise of cognitive computing will require contributions from a large number of people in industry, academia, government and civic life.

So please join the New York Academy of Sciences, ETH Zurich and IBM as they present a discussion between Lino Guzzella, president-elect of ETH, the MIT of Europe; and John Kelly, senior vice president and director of IBM Research, the largest corporate research organization in the world. They will speak about research and collaboration to advance cognitive computing. View the discussion on this Livestream site at 7 p.m. And join the Twitter conversation at #CognitiveComputing, #ETH and #ZHNY.

 

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