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January 2015 Detorit Michigan North American International Auto Show

The American super car, Falcon F7, at the North American International Auto Show this week in Detroit.

By Benjamin Stanley

If recent vehicle sales are any indication, the automotive industry has seen a resurgence of energy in recent years.

However, selling cars, and cars alone, is not going to sustain this renewed momentum and automakers and their partners will have to weather the transformative forces rising up around them. The good news, is that if you look closely, it will become clear that a new industry identity is emerging—one that is more inclusive and without borders.

It is with this new identity in mind that we decided to investigate what the automotive industry will look like in 10 short years. Continue Reading »

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Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

By Bri Connelly

I just got back to Austin from a whirlwind trip to New York City where my classmates from The University of Texas at Austin and I stayed in an Airbnb on the Lower East Side, visited the September 11 Memorial and ate meals at as many different restaurants as we could pack into a short stay. The centerpiece of the trip, though, was the day we spent at IBM Watson Group headquarters at 51 Astor Place competing in the first-ever IBM Watson University Competition.

Last Friday, we were among teams from eight notable universities who showcased prototype apps we had built using Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing technology.  It was like being on an episode of Shark Tank – the judging was really tough. And our app won!

Continue Reading »

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Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

By Ross Mauri

Over the holidays, I spent a few days skiing with family and friends in Vermont. Or, it would be more accurate to say my family and friends skied and I spent much of my time on the phone and email planning today’s launch of the IBM z13, a new  generation of IBM z systems built to redefine digital business and enable the new possible.

I was so preoccupied with work that my daughter’s boyfriend, a 21-year-old university student, asked me what was up. Like many of the millennials I meet, he knew next to nothing about the mainframe. And, like other young people I speak to, he was wowed when I explained to him that many of his day-to-day activities depend on mainframe computers operating in the background–including banking, shopping, getting car insurance, traveling, registering for classes, interacting with the DMV and IRS, and, yes, talking on the phone.

This new generation represents a great leap forward for IBM, our clients and society at large. (Thoughts? Tweet to #innovation.)

Continue Reading »

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SP Kohls Store

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By Ratnakar Lavu

Kohl’s has put its stake in the ground with a new goal to be the most engaging retailer in America. Technology and analytics are a major part of reaching this goal.

Since the first Kohl’s store opened in 1962, so much has changed in the retail industry. Digital and mobile technologies are transforming the business landscape in key ways – blurring the line between physical and digital space and changing the way people and businesses interact.

Companies need to constantly redefine and innovate their strategy to keep up with the pace of change and this is especially true for retailers. At Kohl’s, we are constantly listening to our customers for insights into how we can best serve them. Continue Reading »

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Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

One of our young inventors grew up in a small town in rural South Carolina; another came from Bangladesh; and a third got hooked on computers at age seven in Haifa, Israel. What these three have in common is their youthful optimism and their dedication to one of IBM’s core values: innovation that matters for our company and the world.

This is no empty slogan: Today, IBM announced that it received a record 7,534 US patents in 2014, marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the list of US patent recipients. Amazingly, on average, we receive more than one new US patent for every hour of every work day.

Hidden behind the raw statistics is an exciting insight: IBM’s young scientists, software programmers and engineers are making important contributions to the company’s innovation achievements. (Thoughts? Tweet to #patent, #invent.)
Continue Reading »

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Source: U.S. Department of Transportation

Artist’s rendering of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communication System. (Source: USDOT)

By Chris Poulin

Cars are headed to the cloud. The hottest trend right now in the auto industry is the connected car. And the cloud, with its massive storage, processing, and analytical heft, will power this shift to wired cars. In fact, the auto industry is one of many industries that are working on making their business secure in the cloud.

The momentum behind the connected car is unstoppable. We’ve already seen how cars networked to auto makers’ safety and assistance services help to save lives. In addition to linking with smart devices, we are now seeing cars that can swap signals from sensors in traffic lights, buses, and signs along the road to warn of accidents and cut congestion. Continue Reading »

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December 30th, 2014
16:22
 

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

By Dr. Bertalan Meskó

Simply having access to the information that patients or medical professionals actually need could be the biggest milestone in the history of medicine.

Even in the modern era, we are struggling to find the right information either about lifestyle or therapeutic decisions. Is this the right diet or exercise regimen for me? Is this the only study I should read about this patient’s case? This could change with cognitive computing.

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is beginning to take off. Continue Reading »

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Marc Altshuller

Marc Altshuller, Vice President, Watson Analytics, IBM

By Marc Altshuller

The rapidly rising flood of data – and the demand from all types of users for quick access to it – is beyond the capacity of traditional processes today. As a result, big-time bottlenecks exist for those who need the information and those who are tasked with providing it.

How serious is the issue? Studies show that people engaged in analytics today actually spend more than 50 percent of their time finding, moving and storing data and only a quarter of the time doing analysis. Staying on top of processes, having the relevant information at hand, and soliciting feedback from others are time consuming tasks.

On top of that, the expectation for organizations to quickly gain insights into their business is higher than ever. A recent IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) report, for example, shows that 74 percent of respondents anticipate the speed at which business executives expect new data-driven insights will continue to accelerate. Continue Reading »

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December 17th, 2014
16:00
 

SP Cloud

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By Robert LeBlanc
and Erich Clementi

Cloud computing has gone mainstream in the United States and it’s poised to become the predominant way computing is done in American business and government. But what about the rest of the world? That’s a different story.

Analysis from major IT market researchers shows that cloud adoption in Western Europe lags the US, and it’s just getting off the ground in some other regions and countries. Continue Reading »

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Anne Altman

Anne Altman, General Manager, U.S. Federal, IBM

By Anne Altman

I’m often asked why I’ve spent the majority of my career at IBM and in particular leading our federal government business. My answer is simple really. Nowhere but IBM can you contribute to innovations that change our world so much, and nowhere but in government can you see technology’s impact on so many lives. Now we’re seeing how one of these great innovations, Watson, is transforming how doctors make decisions about patient care.

Today, IBM announced how the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will use Watson in a two-year pilot to help primary care physicians at the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) accelerate their evidence-based decision making. The clinical focus will include supporting veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Continue Reading »

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