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SP Major Will Lyles 1

Major (Ret.) William Lyles (Photo: Montgomery Cty. Police Reporter)

Major (Ret.) William Lyles

I have always wanted to work in an area that requires athletic skills. From original aspirations of being a baseball player to my eventual calling as a member of the U.S. Army and Green Berets, I have always loved physical activity.

Unfortunately, in the summer of 2010, my unit came under heavy fire in Afghanistan. During the attack, I stepped on an improvised explosive device. As a result of the explosion and infections that followed, I had to receive partial amputations in both legs. I am now a bilateral above-the-knee amputee, restricting my physical activities.

I am incredibly grateful to the Military Health System (MHS) for saving my life. And much of my experiences with the system over the past 11 years have been positive. However, I have also seen firsthand areas that could be improved with a more advanced electronic health record (EHR) system. Continue Reading »

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January 21st, 2015
3:00
 

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

By Florian Pinel

IBM Watson, the same cognitive computing system that has been put to work in healthcare, insurance, and retail, and which debuted the world’s first cognitive cooking food truck at SXSW last year, will soon be coming to your kitchen counter in the form of a new cookbook put together by IBM and The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

The cookbook is a result of IBM’s two-year collaboration with culinary partner, ICE, to pair the recipe expertise of world-class chefs with the cognitive power of Watson to generate never-before-seen recipes, many of which will be included in the cookbook, available April 14. Continue Reading »

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Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

By Bri Connelly

I just got back to Austin from a whirlwind trip to New York City where my classmates from The University of Texas at Austin and I stayed in an Airbnb on the Lower East Side, visited the September 11 Memorial and ate meals at as many different restaurants as we could pack into a short stay. The centerpiece of the trip, though, was the day we spent at IBM Watson Group headquarters at 51 Astor Place competing in the first-ever IBM Watson University Competition.

Last Friday, we were among teams from eight notable universities who showcased prototype apps we had built using Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing technology.  It was like being on an episode of Shark Tank – the judging was really tough. And our app won!

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SP Yolanda Wang

Yolanda Wang, Retail Consultant, IBM Global Business Services

By Yolanda Wang

Even in a world where consumers consult multiple online sources for every purchase they make, the store associate remains the most important face of the retail establishment.

With over 70 percent of shoppers making their most recent purchase in a brick-and-mortar store, it makes good sense for retailers to invest in tools that allow their store associates to provide individually-tailored, real-time customer engagement.

Lately, that’s meant simple and intuitive mobile apps that can turn even inexperienced associates into expert advisors equipped with insights drawn from data and analytics, the collective intelligence of the enterprise, the latest market trends, and data specific to each customer.

And that’s just for openers, because retail customers want more savvy associates who can ensure each shopping trip has a successful outcome. According to IBM’s recent retail study, the number of consumers who consider it important for an associate to solve an out-of-stock problem via a mobile device increased from 41 to 46 percent in the past year. Continue Reading »

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Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

By Ross Mauri

Over the holidays, I spent a few days skiing with family and friends in Vermont. Or, it would be more accurate to say my family and friends skied and I spent much of my time on the phone and email planning today’s launch of the IBM z13, a new  generation of IBM z systems built to redefine digital business and enable the new possible.

I was so preoccupied with work that my daughter’s boyfriend, a 21-year-old university student, asked me what was up. Like many of the millennials I meet, he knew next to nothing about the mainframe. And, like other young people I speak to, he was wowed when I explained to him that many of his day-to-day activities depend on mainframe computers operating in the background–including banking, shopping, getting car insurance, traveling, registering for classes, interacting with the DMV and IRS, and, yes, talking on the phone.

This new generation represents a great leap forward for IBM, our clients and society at large. (Thoughts? Tweet to #innovation.)

Continue Reading »

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Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

One of our young inventors grew up in a small town in rural South Carolina; another came from Bangladesh; and a third got hooked on computers at age seven in Haifa, Israel. What these three have in common is their youthful optimism and their dedication to one of IBM’s core values: innovation that matters for our company and the world.

This is no empty slogan: Today, IBM announced that it received a record 7,534 US patents in 2014, marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the list of US patent recipients. Amazingly, on average, we receive more than one new US patent for every hour of every work day.

Hidden behind the raw statistics is an exciting insight: IBM’s young scientists, software programmers and engineers are making important contributions to the company’s innovation achievements. (Thoughts? Tweet to #patent, #invent.)
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Source: U.S. Department of Transportation

Artist’s rendering of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communication System. (Source: USDOT)

By Chris Poulin

Cars are headed to the cloud. The hottest trend right now in the auto industry is the connected car. And the cloud, with its massive storage, processing, and analytical heft, will power this shift to wired cars. In fact, the auto industry is one of many industries that are working on making their business secure in the cloud.

The momentum behind the connected car is unstoppable. We’ve already seen how cars networked to auto makers’ safety and assistance services help to save lives. In addition to linking with smart devices, we are now seeing cars that can swap signals from sensors in traffic lights, buses, and signs along the road to warn of accidents and cut congestion. Continue Reading »

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December 30th, 2014
16:22
 

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

By Dr. Bertalan Meskó

Simply having access to the information that patients or medical professionals actually need could be the biggest milestone in the history of medicine.

Even in the modern era, we are struggling to find the right information either about lifestyle or therapeutic decisions. Is this the right diet or exercise regimen for me? Is this the only study I should read about this patient’s case? This could change with cognitive computing.

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is beginning to take off. Continue Reading »

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December 17th, 2014
16:00
 

SP Cloud

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By Robert LeBlanc
and Erich Clementi

Cloud computing has gone mainstream in the United States and it’s poised to become the predominant way computing is done in American business and government. But what about the rest of the world? That’s a different story.

Analysis from major IT market researchers shows that cloud adoption in Western Europe lags the US, and it’s just getting off the ground in some other regions and countries. Continue Reading »

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December 17th, 2014
15:59
 

Nader Iskander

Nader Iskander

By Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

Nader Iskander, the founder and CEO of EME International, in Cairo, Egypt, isn’t afraid to make a bold bet on a big idea. Way back in 2004, he created a company to develop innovative enterprise mobility solutions across the region. Today, mobile is taking off in Egypt.

And now Iskander is expanding to what he believes will be the next big thing in the region: cloud computing. . “We like to be innovators; first movers,” says Iskander. “There’s huge potential in the cloud to improve our customers’ productivity and profitability.” Already, EME has made a major sale of cloud-based software–to a major Egyptian automobile company.

EME International was among the first 20 Egyptian software makers to complete a cloud computing development program designed by Egypt’s Information Technology Industry Development Agency and IBM.

Continue Reading »

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