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Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

By Alicia Buksar, IBM Communications

As a teenager parking cars at a Fort Lauderdale country club, IBM customer analytics consulting leader Mike Haydock picked up much more than just tips.

Take the life lesson he received one day from Academy Award winning actor George C. Scott. “He gave me a tremendous insight on how he got into the role of Patton,” Haydock said. “He told me he became that role. He became Patton. That’s how he was able to pull that performance off.”

Haydock says he applies that same philosophy to his own work with clients. “I start to think like them,” he said. “So I know everything about the problem they’re trying to solve and probably more.”

That immersive approach has made Haydock, known as the ‘Math Maestro,’ one of IBM’s most sought after analytics experts, a demand that is likely to grow now that he has been named an IBM Fellow. The Fellow designation acknowledges an employee’s important contributions as well as their industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies. Continue Reading »

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Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

By Manny Schecter

The U.S. has endured numerous economic eras — farming, machines, manufacturing, transportation, and so on.  Why has the U.S. economy survived and, more importantly, thrived throughout these periods?  Were we just inherently gifted farmers?  Were we all mechanically inclined?  Are we experts at efficiency?  If not, what then?

Our economy has proven flexible enough to successfully transition from one era to the next, but how?  The answer lies not in details about the eras themselves, but in the innovation that enabled and sustained them.  That is, the U.S. has been a leading innovator in each economic era.  We are curious.  We are creative.  We are inventive.  And this innovative spirit has been the common thread throughout.

Another reason why our nation has successfully navigated numerous economic eras is we have the most robust patent system in the world.  The patent system is an engine for innovation.  Specifically designed to promote innovation, the patent system provides the protection needed to ensure creative endeavors are not misappropriated by others who have not shouldered the same development expense.  To allow otherwise would advantage copycats over inventors. Continue Reading »

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By Steve Hamm

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Aleksandra “Saska” Mojsilovic grew up in the former Yugoslavia before it splintered into nine nations, and, by the time she graduated with a PhD in  electrical engineering from the University of Belgrade in 1997, “The world I knew didn’t exist anymore,” she says. Today, as a scientist at the IBM Research lab in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., she’s making it possible for people to understand how the world works much more deeply than every before–so they can transcend traditional boundaries and make better decisions in their private and professional lives. Continue Reading »

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Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app: Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app, Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

By Rob White

What do Healthy Splash, Dance Penguin Style, Dino Boy, Burger Party, and Ziggy Bones all have in common?

They’re all mobile applications and they were all developed by a group of 3rd and 10th grade students in Ottawa, Canada, taking part in the TechU.me program this week.

This pioneering program encourages the development of critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication skills in young people. Specifically, it links primary students with high-schoolers and private-sector industry mentors to collaborate on mobile educational games and app development. Continue Reading »

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John Armstrong, Partner, IBM Interactive Experience

John Armstrong, Partner, IBM Interactive Experience

By John Armstrong

The current tech narrative is rife with examples of how data analytics has reshaped our world and the industries that play in it. Healthcare providers are able to analyze vast pools of data to improve patient care through greater understanding of an individual’s medical history or determine which treatment is likely to be most effective, for example. Retailers can keep tabs on their customer’s purchases to make product recommendations that are most inclined to catch their interest.

Buoyed by these successes, the industry is pushing data into new, unexpected corners. Recently, we’ve seen individual companies begin to experiment with how data can inform design, from a company’s products to the experiences they offer. It’s about taking something that was once largely art and enriching it through science.

For example, Nike experimented with what it calls “smart data,” using the right data and scenario planning to come up with more sustainable designs for its products, such as a dyeing technique that doesn’t need water. Continue Reading »

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Dan Ricci, IBM Big Data & Analytics Industry

Dan Ricci, IBM Big Data & Analytics Industry

By Dan Ricci

Remember when car dealers pushed tinted windows, rust proofing, and keyless entry to sell cars? That’s ancient history for automakers. Today’s new competitive edge is centered around the Connected Car – and using real-time insights from big data inside and outside of vehicles to improve safety, enhance vehicle quality and enrich the driving and service experience.

Cars are rolling gold mines of information, gathering data about the driver, the driving environment and the car itself, as well as any connected devices. In fact, up to 25 gigabytes of data is generated from a single plug-in hybrid vehicle in just an hour.

And although auto manufacturers have been capturing telematics information for years, something different, more sophisticated is going on now and it has everything to do with big data and analytics. Continue Reading »

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March 27th, 2014
11:30
 

Ron Ambrosio, Distinguished Engineer & CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

Ron Ambrosio, Distinguished Engineer & CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

By Ron Ambrosio

Machines have been connecting to the Internet for many years. To the point that, in today’s Internet of Things, more “Things” are connected to the Internet than people. This evolution now has industrial equipment branching out of their closed control networks to connect to enterprise networks, and in some cases to the Internet, too. But it’s created a challenge in how that data is understood and used. So, we joined AT&T, Cisco, GE, and Intel to establish the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) to help influence the global standards development process for how industrial equipment – like transformers in the grid – connect and communicate.

In the same way you connect to the Internet, whether over wifi or a mobile network, no matter where you go or what device you use, proprietary industrial equipment needs a standard way to communicate, too. Continue Reading »

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James Spohrer, Director, IBM Global University Programs

James Spohrer, Director, IBM Global University Programs

By Jim Spohrer

Moore’s Law describes the phenomenon that drives rapid progress in the electronics industry.  Taking advantage of the laws of physics, engineers have been able to pack transistors ever more densely onto semiconductor chips, doubling their capacity every 18-24 months. The effect of this so-called “scaling” phenomenon is the ability to do more with less space, continuously increasing the capabilities and lowering the cost of computing. Rapid progress is built into the system.

Society’s efforts to scale higher education have not been so successful. Sure, the world’s developed economies handle an immense quantity of university students. In the United States alone, nearly 5,000 institutions of higher education serve more than 20 million students. Yet the way we have scaled up to produce the number of knowledge workers required by modern society is ineffective and unsustainable. In the US, the cost of higher education has increased by 1,120% over the past 35 years, four times the increase in the consumer price index.  And stasis, rather than progress, is built into the system. Continue Reading »

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Kala Fleming, Water Research Scientist, IBM Research - Africa

Kala Fleming, Water Research Scientist, IBM Research – Africa

By Kala Fleming

On the tiny island of Antigua where I grew up we always had enough water. We never had to call a water truck and to our knowledge, no one ever got sick from drinking the water in its natural state. The ‘natural’ state of water on Antigua is straight to the downpipe from the roof and into a concrete tank in the ground under each house. Community ponds also captured extra rainfall that others used for watering animals and washing cars.

Rainwater harvesting in the Caribbean provides a more reliable source of supply than piped systems and the geology of the region limits the availability of ground water. In the Virgin Islands, building regulations even require all new houses to harvest rainwater. So, in places such as urban Africa where ensuring water security has become increasingly tricky, why has this approach not caught on? Continue Reading »

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Sean McKenna, Senior Manager at the IBM Smarter Cities Technology Centre, Dublin, Ireland

Sean McKenna, PhD., Senior Manager at the IBM Smarter Cities Technology Centre, Dublin, Ireland

By Sean McKenna, PhD. 

In heavily populated regions of the world, the available water is fully subscribed. That is, claims have been made on all the available water for different uses including recreation, drinking water supply, industry, agriculture, and energy production.

As global energy consumption continues to rise (estimated 56 percent growth between 2010 and 2040 – US Energy Information Administration, 2013), additional water will be needed to increase energy production.

Finding water that is not already claimed is becoming difficult. However additional efficiencies can be obtained through improved management of the existing water resource. Generating energy through less water intensive means is another approach, but even Solar PV and wind turbines require water to mine and manufacture the materials that comprise them. Continue Reading »

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