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February 17th, 2015
7:00
 

Tahir Ali, Dir. of Enterprise Technology, City of Hope

Tahir Ali, Dir. of Enterprise Technology, City of Hope

By Tahir Ali

When a group of volunteers launched City of Hope in 1913 as a tuberculosis sanitarium on the outskirts of Los Angeles, they initially treated patients in two canvas tents. In spite of those modest circumstances, the founders and staff were dedicated to harnessing the latest advances in medical science on behalf of their patients.

That drive is even stronger today. At City of Hope’s main campus in suburban Duarte and at 12 community practices in Los Angeles and Riverside counties, the organization provides an expressway between scientific breakthroughs and patients suffering from cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Continue Reading »

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February 13th, 2015
13:35
 

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

By Shanker Ramamurthy

In today’s world, it can be difficult to stay abreast of the latest technological trends and distinguish true opportunities from over-hyped fads.

Despite tremendous advances in cognitive computing capabilities, organizations have only begun to scratch the surface of potential for this innovative technology.

From improving customer engagement to enhancing research capabilities that identify new, life-saving medical treatments, the potential value of cognitive-based solutions is boundless.

The first in a series of reports based on research from the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) study, Your Cognitive Future, identifies multiple opportunities across industries to apply cognitive computing today, as well as examines how the technology will evolve. Continue Reading »

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February 10th, 2015
8:00
 

SoftBank's Watson-based robot

SoftBank’s Watson-based robot.

By Michael Karasick

When IBM Watson was first created, it was designed to use English and to answer “factoid” questions. Since then, as we expand Watson’s capabilities to transform industries and professions, we are adapting it for other languages and forging strategic alliances to accelerate adoption globally.

Our alliance with Japan’s SoftBank, announced today, is a powerful example of both of those imperatives at work.

SoftBank, one of the most innovative companies in Japan, has signed on as our strategic partner to help introduce Watson and cognitive computing to the world’s third-largest economy. We’re working with SoftBank to train Watson to “think in” Japanese, and SoftBank will build a powerful ecosystem of partners, including entrepreneurs, app developers and venture investors; as well as take its own Watson-based applications and services to market. Continue Reading »

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February 6th, 2015
4:00
 

Solomon Assefa, IBM, and Zeblon Vilakaz, Wits University

Solomon Assefa, IBM, and Zeblon Vilakaz, Wits University

By Solomon Assefa

When I first visited South Africa more than a year ago from IBM’s research center in New York, I was impressed with the advanced level of science and technology in the country. The country boasts four Nobel laureates in science and medicine and some of the world’s best research organizations.

Among them is the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH). IBM Research is working with them to address one of Africa’s most pressing problems: Tuberculosis. TB is the leading cause of death in South Africa. Roughly half a million people contract the disease each year, and, according to the World Health Organization, 80 percent of the country’s young adults are infected, which exacerbates the spread of HIV. Continue Reading »

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The crowds at the Australian Open 2015.

The crowds at the Australian Open 2015.

By Samir Mahir

Each January, the world’s greatest tennis stars meet in Melbourne to kick off a new year of Grand Slams. They’re greeted, of course, by more than 640,000 tennis fans – ready to watch each serve and volley.

At Tennis Australia, we strive to provide a premier tournament experience both on and off the court. That’s why we’ve teamed up with innovative technology partners to not only enhance the consumer tournament experience but also find new ways to offer some of the world’s best athletes deeper insight into the game they love. Continue Reading »

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Last week's Winter Storm Juno. (Image: The National Weather Service.)

Last week’s Winter Storm Juno. (Image: The National Weather Service.)

By James Bales

Fortunately for many, Juno, the blizzard that hit the Northeastern part of the United States last week, was not the storm of the century the U.S. National Weather Service predicted. However, there was still a lot of planning and precaution taken by utilities companies to ensure citizens, as well as road crews and linemen stayed safe on the job while working around the clock to restore power. With their best workers on standby and ready to respond, utility companies across the Northeast scheduled all personnel to report to work immediately.

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Major (Ret.) William Lyles (Photo: Montgomery Cty. Police Reporter)

Major (Ret.) William Lyles

I have always wanted to work in an area that requires athletic skills. From original aspirations of being a baseball player to my eventual calling as a member of the U.S. Army and Green Berets, I have always loved physical activity.

Unfortunately, in the summer of 2010, my unit came under heavy fire in Afghanistan. During the attack, I stepped on an improvised explosive device. As a result of the explosion and infections that followed, I had to receive partial amputations in both legs. I am now a bilateral above-the-knee amputee, restricting my physical activities.

I am incredibly grateful to the Military Health System (MHS) for saving my life. And much of my experiences with the system over the past 11 years have been positive. However, I have also seen firsthand areas that could be improved with a more advanced electronic health record (EHR) system. Continue Reading »

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January 21st, 2015
3:00
 

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

By Florian Pinel

IBM Watson, the same cognitive computing system that has been put to work in healthcare, insurance, and retail, and which debuted the world’s first cognitive cooking food truck at SXSW last year, will soon be coming to your kitchen counter in the form of a new cookbook put together by IBM and The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

The cookbook is a result of IBM’s two-year collaboration with culinary partner, ICE, to pair the recipe expertise of world-class chefs with the cognitive power of Watson to generate never-before-seen recipes, many of which will be included in the cookbook, available April 14. Continue Reading »

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Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

By Bri Connelly

I just got back to Austin from a whirlwind trip to New York City where my classmates from The University of Texas at Austin and I stayed in an Airbnb on the Lower East Side, visited the September 11 Memorial and ate meals at as many different restaurants as we could pack into a short stay. The centerpiece of the trip, though, was the day we spent at IBM Watson Group headquarters at 51 Astor Place competing in the first-ever IBM Watson University Competition.

Last Friday, we were among teams from eight notable universities who showcased prototype apps we had built using Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing technology.  It was like being on an episode of Shark Tank – the judging was really tough. And our app won!

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Yolanda Wang, Retail Consultant, IBM Global Business Services

By Yolanda Wang

Even in a world where consumers consult multiple online sources for every purchase they make, the store associate remains the most important face of the retail establishment.

With over 70 percent of shoppers making their most recent purchase in a brick-and-mortar store, it makes good sense for retailers to invest in tools that allow their store associates to provide individually-tailored, real-time customer engagement.

Lately, that’s meant simple and intuitive mobile apps that can turn even inexperienced associates into expert advisors equipped with insights drawn from data and analytics, the collective intelligence of the enterprise, the latest market trends, and data specific to each customer.

And that’s just for openers, because retail customers want more savvy associates who can ensure each shopping trip has a successful outcome. According to IBM’s recent retail study, the number of consumers who consider it important for an associate to solve an out-of-stock problem via a mobile device increased from 41 to 46 percent in the past year. Continue Reading »

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