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Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

By Rob High

IBM has long played a major role in Silicon Valley. We built a manufacturing plant there in 1943 and opened our IBM Research lab in San Jose in 1956–since then producing a string of technology breakthroughs including the first disk drive, the first data mining algorithms and essential advances in nanotechnology.  My dad got his start as an IBM engineer in the Valley in 1958, so it has a special place in my heart.

IBM’s Watson business, which is based in New York City, is collaborating with dozens of startups in the Valley and San Francisco; and IBM’s venture group has close working relationships with a number of leading venture capitalists there.

To take Watson even further, today, IBM is greatly expanding our presence in this cradle of global technology innovation. We’re opening a Watson hub in San Francisco. This will put IBM closer to, and increase collaboration with, the local start ups, developers, venture capital groups, and academics we’re working with. We’ll host activities aimed at sparking a new wave of innovation built on advances in cognitive computing.

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Doug Schaedler, CEO, inno360

Doug Schaedler, CEO, inno360

By Doug Schaedler

I was recently describing inno360′s new software release and enhanced functionality to a c-suite executive at a global consumer packaged goods company. He was intrigued by the fact that our latest software, thanks in part to IBM’s Watson technology, has the ability to learn and push more relevant information to employees as they interact with it. He saw that in a short period of time our software could make his whole company smarter and more efficient.

The reaction of this prospective client bodes well for inno360 clients and our recent ecosystem partnership with IBM Watson to deliver Watson cognitive capability. Our software offers the ability for our clients to achieve rapid and enhanced return on investment, but also will increase our revenues and make our software mission critical to our global client base, of which 15 are the #1 ranked leaders in their respective global vertical industries.

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Jimoh, right, and the original ROSS Intelligence team

Jimoh, right, and colleagues at ROSS Intelligence

By Steve Hamm

Just a few months ago, Jimoh Ovbiagele was a junior computer science major at the University of Toronto. Today, he’s the chief technology officer of ROSS Intelligence, a Toronto-based startup that’s harnessing IBM Watson in an attempt to transform the legal profession by streamlining case law research. This is no pipe dream: the software is being piloted by Dentons, the world’s largest law firm–giving it an industry stamp of approval.

“From the moment we had the opportunity to touch Watson, we saw that we could change a whole industry. So that’s what we set out to do,” Jimoh says.

Thanks to the IBM Watson Ecosystem, tiny startups like ROSS Intelligence can begin to disrupt the status quo in one industry after another–and in a matter of months. Continue Reading »

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Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow

Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist, Brain-Inspired Computing

By Dharmendra S. Modha

For decades, computer scientists have been pursuing two elusive goals in parallel: engineering energy-efficient computers modeled on the human brain and designing smart computing systems that learn on their own—like humans do—and are not programmed like today’s computers. Both goals are now within reach.

And, today, as we launch our ecosystem for brain-inspired computing with a TrueNorth Boot Camp for academic and government researchers, I expect that the two quests will begin to converge. By the end of the intensive three-week training program, hopefully, early adopters will set out to show potential for these new technologies to transform industries and society.

The boot camp is a pivotal step in bringing brain-inspired computing to society by putting cutting-edge innovation in the hands of some of the best and brightest researchers who will begin to invent a wealth of applications and systems that we cannot even imagine today.

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Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

By Kyu Rhee

When it comes to transforming healthcare, IBM started by looking at what we could do for our own employees. More than a decade ago, thought leaders within the company helped shape one of the most important concepts in healthcare today–patient-centered primary care.

That’s the idea that healthcare should be organized around the individual and that all of the organizations and healthcare providers involved should coordinate to deliver truly personalized services addressing everything from promoting healthy lifestyles to treating diseases.

Since then, we’ve been on a steady march to infuse people-centric, relationship-based thinking into every aspect of healthcare and wellness at IBM–and we’re committed to creating technology-based solutions that give organizations and healthcare providers worldwide the tools for improving the health and well-being of their populations. Continue Reading »

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Rick Relyea, left, director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George; and Harry Kolar, IBM Distinguished Engineer and associate director.

Rick Relyea, left, director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George; and Harry Kolar, IBM Distinguished Engineer and associate director.

By Harry Kolar

New York’s Lake George is a pristine, 32-mile-long lake in the Adirondack Mountains that is noted for its water quality and clarity. While the lake is very clean, it faces multiple anthropogenic threats, including road salt incursion and several invasive species.

The Jefferson Project at Lake George, a joint research collaboration involving Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM Research, and the FUND for Lake George, is focused on protecting the lake and helping address the world’s looming freshwater supply challenges.

The project involves more than 60 scientists around the world (four IBM Research labs are involved), including biologists, computer scientists, physicists, engineers and chemists. Working as a virtual team, we’re pushing the boundaries in Internet-of-Things sensors, data analytics, and modeling of complex natural systems. Continue Reading »

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Robert Griffin, General Manager, IBM Safer Planet

Robert Griffin, General Manager, IBM Safer Planet

By Robert Griffin

We live in a dangerous world. You know the threats as well as I do. But we don’t have to live in fear. I’m convinced that technology can help police, corporate security officers, national security agencies and emergency management officials do their jobs better–making people, companies, cities and countries safer.

Situational intelligence is the key to making the world less dangerous. The more we know, the better prepared we are when the worst happens–and the more likely we are to be able to prevent it. To know more, we need to be able to sift through all the evidence to understand what’s happening now, and why, and what’s likely to happen next. Continue Reading »

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June 17th, 2015
6:38
 

Ron Ambrosio, CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

Ron Ambrosio, CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

By Ron Ambrosio

You walk into a room at night and flip the light switch on the wall. The lights come on. You didn’t think twice about that …you were certain it would work. While we’re not at that point everywhere in the world yet, it is true of most industrialized regions that electricity is a highly reliable resource. But the reality behind that simple action of turning on a light switch is a constantly evolving list of uncertainties that utilities deal with 24/7.

Uncertainty takes many forms in the utility industry, from the health of individual devices as they age, to volatility of fuel prices, to the behavior of you, the consumer, and your use of electricity or natural gas. And uncertainty can be equated to risk — the risk of failing to achieve both operational and business objectives. That’s not a risk any business wants to take. Continue Reading »

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Bob Picciano, Sr.VP, IBM Analytics

Bob Picciano, Sr. VP, IBM Analytics

By Bob Picciano

Over the weekend, a room full of top developers competed in a hackathon in San Francisco–vying for bragging rights to coding on top of the Spark data-processing engine. The winners will be announced later, but, based on the results of an internal IBM hackathon a few weeks ago, I can give you the bottom line: these competitions show that Spark could shake up data analytics just like the Linux operating system blew the lid off the Internet a decade ago.

Today, large-scale data processing is available mainly to corporations, government agencies and universities. Spark, an open source software project under the Apache Software Foundation umbrella, has the potential to place these capabilities at the fingertips of all types of people and organizations all over the world. The goal: deeper and faster insights. Continue Reading »

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