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business analytics
November 21st, 2014
6:00
 

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research - Almaden

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research – Almaden

By Jeffrey Welser

One of the watershed moments in the history of computing took place on Dec. 9, 1968. Douglas Engelbart and his team at Stanford Research Institute presented a technology demonstration that included the first public showings of the computer mouse, hypertext, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration over a network. Those advances turned out to be essential building blocks for personal computing and Internet, and the event came to be called “The Mother of All Demos.”

While only history will say for sure, I think we saw the glimmer of a similar new beginning last week at IBM Research – Almaden, in Silicon Valley.  The IBM Cognitive Systems Colloquium signaled a shift from a singular focus on the von Neumann computing architecture, which has dominated computer science and the computer industry since the mid-1940s, to new architectures modeled on the human brain. Continue Reading »

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Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

By Jonathan Schaeffer

At the just-concluded G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, the leaders of the 20 major economies in the world agreed to “take strong and effective action” on climate change.

Still, at this critical juncture in the history of our planet, it is essential that the scientific world continue to document the dramatic climate changes occurring all across the globe.

One technological area gaining wider use is remote sensing. Today sensors are powerful and inexpensive, network access to remote data is increasing, scientific models are improving, and “big data” algorithms for crunching the numbers are more accessible. Continue Reading »

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Michael Dixon, General Manager, Global Smarter Cities, IBM

Michael Dixon, General Manager, Global Smarter Cities, IBM

By Michael Dixon

While there is always interest in the exciting innovations in cities – such as intelligent transportation systems – the backbone of any city operation is comprised of efficient water pipes and reliable electrical wires.

The availability, delivery and consumption of natural resources like energy and water is far more important to cities than a new fleet of busses. Optimizing resources is particularly relevant for cities because of their impact on both livability as well as resilience. Continue Reading »

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Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

By Jeff Schick

For more than 30 years, email has been stuck in a rut. It’s still basically a list of messages that we plow through all day, every day—in our private and professional lives.  The important stuff is hidden among the trivial and the routine. Sure, you can fiddle with rankings and do rudimentary searches, but, for all the time we spend dealing with our email, it’s one of the least-evolved computer activities around.  Think of it as a tax on your brain.

I probably speak for many people when I say that the first word that comes to mind when I think of email is “frustration.” Actually, the word that comes to mind is less polite than that. That high level of collective frustration is what drove a talented team of software engineers and user experience designers at IBM to reimagine the domain—putting people and relationships at the center of things. Continue Reading »

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John Kelly, SVP, IBM Research

Dr. John Kelly III, SVP, IBM Research

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

The microprocessor was one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Those chips of silicon and copper have come to play such a vital role that they’re frequently referred to as the “brains” of the computer. Today’s computer designs put the processor at the center.

But the needs of businesses and society are changing rapidly, so the computer industry must respond with a new approach to computer design—which we at IBM call data-centric computing. In the future, much of the processing will move to where the data resides, whether that’s within a single computer, in a network or out on the cloud. Microprocessors will still be vitally important, but their work will be divided up.

This shift is necessary because of the explosion of big data. Every day, society generates an estimated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data—everything from corporate ledgers to individual health records to personal Tweets.

Continue Reading »

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November 12th, 2014
9:00
 

SP Cog Coll 2014One of the most intriguing elements of the new era of cognitive computing is the development of brain-inspired technologies. Those are technologies that mimic the functioning of the neurons, axons and synapses in the mammal brain with the goal of interpreting the physical world and processing sensory data: sight, sound, touch and smell. Today’s IBM Research Cognitive Systems Colloquium at IBM Research – Almaden is focusing on this realm of the cognitive computing world. Please come back for frequent reports and updates, and join the conversation at #cognitivecomputing. Continue Reading »

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November 11th, 2014
9:00
 

SP Cognitive Computing ImageBy Jeffrey Welser

One of the most intriguing research projects at the Almaden lab over the past decade has been the development of a neurosynaptic microchip modeled on the workings of the brain. Funded since 2008 by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s SyNAPSE initiative, a team at Almaden led by Dharmendra S. Modha created not only a radically new chip architecture but a new approach to creating software applications.

Tomorrow, their work begins the transition from a science research project to a technology that’s on its way into the commercial marketplace. Continue Reading »

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SP Melbourne FashionBy Lucan Creamer

Each year, the City of Melbourne is proud to showcase the best in Australian fashion through the internationally recognised Melbourne Spring Fashion Week (MSFW).

Audiences both local and global engage with the event online and offline, and increasingly we’re seeing the impact of their conversations on the retail industry over the course of the event. From the rise of bloggers to a surge in e-commerce, fashion is going digital and for an iconic event like MSFW, the opportunity to lift our share of voice online was too compelling to ignore.

Our goal for the event this year was to amplify MSFW online, create a unique experience for Melbourne locals and businesses alike, and in doing so gain some invaluable insights into our audience. Continue Reading »

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November 5th, 2014
11:42
 

Professor Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

Dr. Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

By Dr. Ralf Steinmetz

Today there are more than 9 billion connected devices such as, smartphones, sensors and more around the world. That number is expected to grow to between 50 billion and a trillion within the next decade.

These connected devices are at the heart of the Internet of Things and contribute volumes to our society’s growing mountain of Big Data, which provide insights to everything from biometrics to energy consumption, and trends to preferences.

This increasingly unprecedented amount of data is driving dramatic changes across industries and requires a new level of power to process and analyze it all: the cloud. Continue Reading »

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Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

By Shanker Ramamurthy

In an era that is highly digitized, there’s no shortage of data for organizations to consume and leverage. But, while speed-to-action should be a given, it’s only recently that the value driver for Big Data has shifted from volume and variety to velocity and veracity.

Capabilities that enable an organization to consume data faster – to move from raw data to insight-driven actions – are now the key differentiator for organizations investing in data and analytics.

According to “Analytics: The Speed Advantage,” a new study completed by the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV), 74 percent of global businesses and IT professionals anticipate the speed at which business executives expect new, data-driven insights will continue to accelerate. Continue Reading »

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