Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
business analytics
November 5th, 2014
11:42
 

Professor Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

Dr. Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

By Dr. Ralf Steinmetz

Today there are more than 9 billion connected devices such as, smartphones, sensors and more around the world. That number is expected to grow to between 50 billion and a trillion within the next decade.

These connected devices are at the heart of the Internet of Things and contribute volumes to our society’s growing mountain of Big Data, which provide insights to everything from biometrics to energy consumption, and trends to preferences.

This increasingly unprecedented amount of data is driving dramatic changes across industries and requires a new level of power to process and analyze it all: the cloud. Continue Reading »

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Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

By Shanker Ramamurthy

In an era that is highly digitized, there’s no shortage of data for organizations to consume and leverage. But, while speed-to-action should be a given, it’s only recently that the value driver for Big Data has shifted from volume and variety to velocity and veracity.

Capabilities that enable an organization to consume data faster – to move from raw data to insight-driven actions – are now the key differentiator for organizations investing in data and analytics.

According to “Analytics: The Speed Advantage,” a new study completed by the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV), 74 percent of global businesses and IT professionals anticipate the speed at which business executives expect new, data-driven insights will continue to accelerate. Continue Reading »

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SP Cog Coll 2014The world is in the early stages of a major shift—from the programmable computing era to the era of cognitive systems. Today at IBM Research, we’re convening our second-annual Cognitive Systems Colloquium. We’ll be hearing from some of the smartest people in the tech industry. Please return throughout the day for frequent updates. And join the discussion at #CognitiveComputing.

9:10  Zach Lemnios, vice president research strategy and worldwide operations:

We’re here to bring together researchers, clients, students, young entrepreneurs. We want to highlight the work of the past year and look at the challenges before us, and help to build an ecosystem to drive innovations in cognitive computing. How do we scale up this enterprise—how do we create ways for people to use these systems in ways that are very easy to use.

Continue Reading »

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Repsol Sovex Rig (Santos-Basin Bra

Repsol Sovex Rig (Santos Basin-Brazil).

By Steve Hamm

One of the great hopes for cognitive computing is that it will provide organizations with powerful new insights that enable them to penetrate complexity and rethink the way they do business—potentially transforming whole industries.

The oil and gas industry is ripe for transformation.

That’s because the uncertainties and geological risks are so great in resource exploration and the pressures are so great to maximize the productivity of existing oil and gas fields—whether they’re on dry land or thousands of feet under the sea.

Repsol S.A., a global energy company with its headquarters in Madrid, Spain, has teamed with IBM in a three-year collaboration to bring cognitive computing to bear on these so-called “upstream” aspects of its business, where energy companies face so much complexity and where decision making is so crucial to their success.

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October 29th, 2014
11:45
 

Alistair Rennie, GM IBM Business Analytics

Alistair Rennie, GM IBM Business Analytics

By Alistair Rennie

Each day, Twitter users press the button on about 500 million Tweets. That tsunami of 140-character messages spans the range of human interests and activities—from raves about recent purchases to exhortations to rally behind social causes.

Personally, I use Twitter as a sort of market-intelligence radar. I follow very smart people to see what they’re reading and thinking.

SP ibm twitter 1Now, for the first time, business leaders will be able to tap into the Twitter stream in powerful new ways to harvest insights that help them understand customer sentiment more deeply, develop hit products and services, and anticipate sudden shifts in moods and markets.

That’s because IBM and Twitter are combining forces to incorporate Twitter’s rich data streams into IBM’s cloud-based analytics, customer engagement platforms and consulting services.

Continue Reading »

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October 27th, 2014
0:01
 

BigDatavsEbolaBy Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

On Aug. 5, a group of open data mavens and government officials from Africa gathered in Washington, D.C., to launch an initiative called Africa Open Data. The goal was to help African countries tap open data as a means of addressing health, infrastructure and economic challenges. In a shocking turn of events, members of the Sierra Leone delegation simultaneously received text messages alerting them that their flight back home had been canceled due to the rapid spread of Ebola. Suddenly, they were citizens cut off from their country.

“They had looks on their faces of total panic, fear and trauma,” recounts Steven Adler, IBM’s open data evangelist and an organizer of the the event. On the spot, Steve and other participants started brainstorming ways they–and data–could help . They banged around ideas and began emailing and texting friends and associates they thought could lend a hand. Continue Reading »

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Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

By Ronan Rooney

There has been a lot of discussion about the cost of health care and many suggestions about how we can improve population health.

Traditional models of care focus on individual episodes and they work really well for people with simple clinical, behavioral or social challenges. Where they fall down is when they’re applied to people who have multiple or complex challenges – the people we consider the most vulnerable.

As part of IBM’s Curam Research Team, we’re very focused on finding new ways to help those vulnerable citizens who are responsible for a disproportionate amount of healthcare expenditure – the top 5% of spenders drive 45%-50% of total medical spending. Continue Reading »

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SP Sensor on BoatBy Harry Kolar

One year ago, IBM, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Fund for Lake George announced the Jefferson Project, an ambitious effort to model the entire lake – its depths and shoreline – to get a holistic and accurate view of everything happening in and around one of the United State’s pristine lakes.

The goals of the project are multifold and include understanding and managing the complex factors impacting the lake, from invasive species, pollution, and other factors, to developing a template to use in other fresh water bodies around the globe. Continue Reading »

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Erick Brethenoux, Director, Business Analytics and Decision Management Strategy, IBM Software Group

Erick Brethenoux, Director, Business Analytics and Decision Management Strategy, IBM Software Group

By Erick Brethenoux

Emotional moments can be the most powerful ones we experience. They are transient, yet long-lasting. They happen quickly but can dissolve in an instant, leaving us with a moment we may never forget. They are a big part of what makes us human.

If we could better understand the reasons and circumstances around particular emotional moments, we could better understand our clients, patrons and constituents. In fact, organizations are doing just that and using things like predictive analytics to uncover connections from data we gather on a daily basis.

Continue Reading »

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Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

By Bernard Tyson

Since shortly after Kaiser Permanente’s launch in 1945, this organization has been at the forefront of using technology to improve patient care. We started collecting large amounts of data about patients and treatment outcomes long before electronic medical records and “big data” became hot topics. And, today, we remain one of the early adopters of cutting-edge technology in the healthcare industry.

Like other healthcare organizations, we take advantage of technology to make our operations more efficient and to help deliver superior care. But I believe that information technology can play an even more important role in this industry: It can help us transform from focusing on healthcare to focusing on health.

What do I mean by that? To me, the term healthcare connotes being reactive to problems. That’s not enough. An organization that focuses more broadly on health itself can help people extend their lives and live healthier lives. Continue Reading »

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