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business analytics

The Passenger+ App.

The Passenger+ App.

By Bridget van Kralingen

A recent survey of cable customers showed that the industry’s brand vulnerability rates running 50% to 70% higher than other consumer-facing industries. On top of that, more than half of those surveyed said they would switch providers if they had a choice.

But what if a cable or telecom provider could transform the quality, efficiency and the nature of the technical service interaction — polishing their brands, earning new customer loyalty and, at the same time, improving the job satisfaction of their employees? Continue Reading »

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 Dr. Patrick Parfrey, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St John's, Newfoundland

Dr. Patrick Parfrey, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John’s, Newfoundland

By Dr. Patrick Parfrey

Research within the Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland is about to enter a new era.

For decades, researchers at our facility followed traditional routes to answer their research question with the hope of finding a sometimes elusive answer that could affect change. Conventionally at the end of the project, with luck, a good research paper was published in a high-impact journal. And for a substantial amount of time these findings didn’t move in the direction of change the researchers had hoped.

The Translational & Personalized Medicine Initiative (TPMI) is a program that will support the broader goals of health system reform through the creation of a sustainable health system by reducing inappropriate utilization, increasing efficiencies, improving cost effectiveness, and improving patient outcomes.  Continue Reading »

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SP Lesser

Eric Lesser, Research Director, Institute for Business Value, IBM

By Bruce Fern and Eric Lesser

While in recent years many companies have strengthened their analytics capabilities in areas such as marketing, supply chain and finance, far fewer have become adept in applying analytics to unravel elusive workforce dynamics such as turnover, employee engagement and productivity.

In fact, less than 20 percent of organizations report being able to apply predictive analytics to address important people issues. However, an increasing number of executives are realizing the power of talent analytics and its ability to challenge conventional wisdom, influence behavior, guide decision-making and, ultimately, impact business outcomes.

A new IBM Institute for Business Value study, Unlock the People Equation: Using Workforce Analytics to Drive Business Results, captured the insights of more than 40 executives with responsibility for workforce analytics in 15 industries. Continue Reading »

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SP Online Shopping Lilly2By Jay Henderson

We all knew it was coming eventually and IBM predicted it would happen this year as it indeed did – more Thanksgiving shoppers turned to their mobile devices than their desktops to browse through all of the Thanksgiving deals.

Specifically, from IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark  we saw 52.1 percent of traffic on Thanksgiving coming from mobile devices, a 22 percent jump from last year. Even more incredibly, if you go back to 2010 only 6.5 percent of traffic came from mobile. That is an eight-fold increase in traffic over only four years.

With regard to sales, mobile devices accounted for 32.3 percent, which percentage-wise was an even greater year-over-year increase at 25.4 percent than the observed increase in mobile traffic. Continue Reading »

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Early General Motors auto designers.

Early General Motors auto designers.

By Paul Papas

Picture an architect laboring over a blueprint, or an auto designer working out the basics of next year’s model. Once upon a time, this mental image probably included a drafting table and a clay model, but not much else.

With some variation, those were creative tools that designers, architects and artists relied on to render their inspirations, refine them into concepts, and finalize them into market-ready products.

Fast forward to the era of high-performance computing and how this has radically transformed the creative process in pharmaceuticals, automotive, and government R&D – where the trials, mistakes and amazing breakthroughs were rendered, tested and proven in silicon, before they were realized in factories. Continue Reading »

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Drew Johnson, Vice President, Engineering, Aeris Communications

Drew Johnson, Vice President, Engineering, Aeris Communications

By Drew Johnson

As the Internet of Things (IoT) and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications connect millions of diverse machines over networks, the goal is to make the combination of those machines greater than the sum of each type and to provide people with greater information and insight as the ecosystem expands.

To achieve this level of interconnectivity, businesses that depend on those machines need them to work reliably, securely, and cost-effectively – without human intervention. That’s where an unexpected technology function comes in to help: crowdsourcing.

Crowdsourcing typically conjures up images of people-driven programs, like traffic information gathered from thousands of commuters or weather reports created by people supplying pictures and information from their mobile devices. Continue Reading »

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November 21st, 2014
6:00
 

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research - Almaden

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research – Almaden

By Jeffrey Welser

One of the watershed moments in the history of computing took place on Dec. 9, 1968. Douglas Engelbart and his team at Stanford Research Institute presented a technology demonstration that included the first public showings of the computer mouse, hypertext, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration over a network. Those advances turned out to be essential building blocks for personal computing and Internet, and the event came to be called “The Mother of All Demos.”

While only history will say for sure, I think we saw the glimmer of a similar new beginning last week at IBM Research – Almaden, in Silicon Valley.  The IBM Cognitive Systems Colloquium signaled a shift from a singular focus on the von Neumann computing architecture, which has dominated computer science and the computer industry since the mid-1940s, to new architectures modeled on the human brain. Continue Reading »

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Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

By Jonathan Schaeffer

At the just-concluded G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, the leaders of the 20 major economies in the world agreed to “take strong and effective action” on climate change.

Still, at this critical juncture in the history of our planet, it is essential that the scientific world continue to document the dramatic climate changes occurring all across the globe.

One technological area gaining wider use is remote sensing. Today sensors are powerful and inexpensive, network access to remote data is increasing, scientific models are improving, and “big data” algorithms for crunching the numbers are more accessible. Continue Reading »

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Michael Dixon, General Manager, Global Smarter Cities, IBM

Michael Dixon, General Manager, Global Smarter Cities, IBM

By Michael Dixon

While there is always interest in the exciting innovations in cities – such as intelligent transportation systems – the backbone of any city operation is comprised of efficient water pipes and reliable electrical wires.

The availability, delivery and consumption of natural resources like energy and water is far more important to cities than a new fleet of busses. Optimizing resources is particularly relevant for cities because of their impact on both livability as well as resilience. Continue Reading »

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Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

By Jeff Schick

For more than 30 years, email has been stuck in a rut. It’s still basically a list of messages that we plow through all day, every day—in our private and professional lives.  The important stuff is hidden among the trivial and the routine. Sure, you can fiddle with rankings and do rudimentary searches, but, for all the time we spend dealing with our email, it’s one of the least-evolved computer activities around.  Think of it as a tax on your brain.

I probably speak for many people when I say that the first word that comes to mind when I think of email is “frustration.” Actually, the word that comes to mind is less polite than that. That high level of collective frustration is what drove a talented team of software engineers and user experience designers at IBM to reimagine the domain—putting people and relationships at the center of things. Continue Reading »

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