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Cloud Computing

Marc Altshuller

Marc Altshuller, Vice President, Watson Analytics, IBM

By Marc Altshuller

The rapidly rising flood of data – and the demand from all types of users for quick access to it – is beyond the capacity of traditional processes today. As a result, big-time bottlenecks exist for those who need the information and those who are tasked with providing it.

How serious is the issue? Studies show that people engaged in analytics today actually spend more than 50 percent of their time finding, moving and storing data and only a quarter of the time doing analysis. Staying on top of processes, having the relevant information at hand, and soliciting feedback from others are time consuming tasks.

On top of that, the expectation for organizations to quickly gain insights into their business is higher than ever. A recent IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) report, for example, shows that 74 percent of respondents anticipate the speed at which business executives expect new data-driven insights will continue to accelerate. Continue Reading »

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December 17th, 2014
16:00
 

SP CloudBy Robert LeBlanc
and Erich Clementi

Cloud computing has gone mainstream in the United States and it’s poised to become the predominant way computing is done in American business and government. But what about the rest of the world? That’s a different story.

Analysis from major IT market researchers shows that cloud adoption in Western Europe lags the US, and it’s just getting off the ground in some other regions and countries.

Some emerging markets trail far behind. That’s unfortunate because those economies would benefit most from an approach to computing that requires little or no capital investment, allows organizations to share computing resources, and makes it possible to get going in days or weeks rather than months.Why is global progress so variable?

There are multiple factors at work. In Western Europe, government privacy laws require organizations to store certain types of data within the borders of countries or within the European Community. Technology buyers are concerned about compatibility with existing applications. And, in many situations, buyers are reluctant to make big bets on technologies that they consider to be unproven or where the applications they seek are not yet available as cloud services.

In order to deepen the penetration of cloud services worldwide, the tech industry must address these concerns head on.

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December 17th, 2014
15:59
 

Nader Iskander

Nader Iskander

By Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

Nader Iskander, the founder and CEO of EME International, in Cairo, Egypt, isn’t afraid to make a bold bet on a big idea. Way back in 2004, he created a company to develop innovative enterprise mobility solutions across the region. Today, mobile is taking off in Egypt.

And now Iskander is expanding to what he believes will be the next big thing in the region: cloud computing. . “We like to be innovators; first movers,” says Iskander. “There’s huge potential in the cloud to improve our customers’ productivity and profitability.” Already, EME has made a major sale of cloud-based software–to a major Egyptian automobile company.

EME International was among the first 20 Egyptian software makers to complete a cloud computing development program designed by Egypt’s Information Technology Industry Development Agency and IBM.

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The Passenger+ App.

The Passenger+ App.

By Bridget van Kralingen

A recent survey of cable customers showed that the industry’s brand vulnerability rates running 50% to 70% higher than other consumer-facing industries. On top of that, more than half of those surveyed said they would switch providers if they had a choice.

But what if a cable or telecom provider could transform the quality, efficiency and the nature of the technical service interaction — polishing their brands, earning new customer loyalty and, at the same time, improving the job satisfaction of their employees? Continue Reading »

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By Wayne Balta

After years of progress, deforestation of the Amazon basin in Brazil has increased for the past two years running. It rose by 29% in the last recorded year, according to a recent report from the Brazilian government.

The Nature Conservancy, which is the largest environmental advocacy group in the world, has adopted a promising approach to addressing deforestation, which it calls “conservation with development.” Continue Reading »

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November 24th, 2014
9:00
 

Thomas Cooper Library, University of South Carolina

Thomas Cooper Library, University of South Carolina

By Michael King

The bell has rung for the need to transform education.

Although elementary and secondary education has evolved significantly over the past decades, the near future of our industry is set to have even more impactful developments.

Technological advances in Big Data analytics, mobile proliferation in and outside of the classroom, and the emergence of cloud-based smart content is creating increasingly precise tools to determine which educational practices will prove most effective and radically transform current educational practices.

Such cutting-edge analytics and cloud-based smart content can help educators unlock deep insights that will transform our approach to learning and help move the classroom from assembly-line models into a truly personalized environment – environments that motivate and engage learners at all levels, from kindergarteners learning the alphabet to university students exploring majors. Continue Reading »

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November 21st, 2014
6:00
 

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research - Almaden

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research – Almaden

By Jeffrey Welser

One of the watershed moments in the history of computing took place on Dec. 9, 1968. Douglas Engelbart and his team at Stanford Research Institute presented a technology demonstration that included the first public showings of the computer mouse, hypertext, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration over a network. Those advances turned out to be essential building blocks for personal computing and Internet, and the event came to be called “The Mother of All Demos.”

While only history will say for sure, I think we saw the glimmer of a similar new beginning last week at IBM Research – Almaden, in Silicon Valley.  The IBM Cognitive Systems Colloquium signaled a shift from a singular focus on the von Neumann computing architecture, which has dominated computer science and the computer industry since the mid-1940s, to new architectures modeled on the human brain. Continue Reading »

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Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

By Jeff Schick

For more than 30 years, email has been stuck in a rut. It’s still basically a list of messages that we plow through all day, every day—in our private and professional lives.  The important stuff is hidden among the trivial and the routine. Sure, you can fiddle with rankings and do rudimentary searches, but, for all the time we spend dealing with our email, it’s one of the least-evolved computer activities around.  Think of it as a tax on your brain.

I probably speak for many people when I say that the first word that comes to mind when I think of email is “frustration.” Actually, the word that comes to mind is less polite than that. That high level of collective frustration is what drove a talented team of software engineers and user experience designers at IBM to reimagine the domain—putting people and relationships at the center of things. Continue Reading »

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John Kelly, SVP, IBM Research

Dr. John Kelly III, SVP, IBM Research

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

The microprocessor was one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Those chips of silicon and copper have come to play such a vital role that they’re frequently referred to as the “brains” of the computer. Today’s computer designs put the processor at the center.

But the needs of businesses and society are changing rapidly, so the computer industry must respond with a new approach to computer design—which we at IBM call data-centric computing. In the future, much of the processing will move to where the data resides, whether that’s within a single computer, in a network or out on the cloud. Microprocessors will still be vitally important, but their work will be divided up.

This shift is necessary because of the explosion of big data. Every day, society generates an estimated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data—everything from corporate ledgers to individual health records to personal Tweets.

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Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

By Michael Nova M.D.

To describe me as a health nut would be a gross understatement. I run five days a week, bench press 275 pounds, do 120 pushups at a time, and surf the really big waves in Indonesia. I don’t eat red meat, I typically have berries for breakfast and salad for dinner, and I consume an immense amount of kale—even though I don’t like the way it tastes. My daily vitamin/supplement regimen includes Alpha-lipoic acid, Coenzyme Q and Resveratrol. And, yes, I wear one of those fitness gizmos around my neck to count how many steps I take in a day.

I have been following this regimen for years, and it’s an essential part of my life.

For anybody concerned about health, diet and fitness, these are truly amazing times. There’s a superabundance of health and fitness information published online. We’re able to tap into our electronic health records, we can measure just about everything we do physically, and, thanks to the plummeting price of gene sequencing, we can map our complete genomes for as little as $3000 and get readings on smaller chunks of genomic data for less than $100.

Think of it as your own personal health big-data tsunami. Continue Reading »

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