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Brian Book, President, Book Zurman, Inc.

Brian Book, President, Book Zurman, Inc.

A Gulf War veteran, Brian Book is the president of Book Zurman, Inc., a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) that has partnered with IBM. Brian is leading a team that is a finalist in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Care Coordination Challenge for Improved Outcomes. Without revealing too much about the team’s final submission due on Nov. 23, Brian sat down with Smarter Planet to discuss the role of cognitive and cloud. Below is a summary of that conversation. 

Smarter Plant:  What is the VA’s Care Coordination Challenge?

Brian Book: Veterans receiving care interact with facilities inside and outside of the VA often involving multiple specialists, clinicians and other personnel. Establishing a single treatment plan across all these providers has proven to be an elusive challenge, but one the VA views as critical to enabling better treatment plans and outcomes. The VA is seeking potential solutions from industry, researchers, developers and others to “create algorithms (methods, processes and/or tools) for identifying redundancies, gaps, conflicts, and interactions among care-plan items and other data.” After the first competitive round, our team is one of five finalists. Continue Reading »

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Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

By Rob High

IBM has long played a major role in Silicon Valley. We built a manufacturing plant there in 1943 and opened our IBM Research lab in San Jose in 1956–since then producing a string of technology breakthroughs including the first disk drive, the first data mining algorithms and essential advances in nanotechnology.  My dad got his start as an IBM engineer in the Valley in 1958, so it has a special place in my heart.

IBM’s Watson business, which is based in New York City, is collaborating with dozens of startups in the Valley and San Francisco; and IBM’s venture group has close working relationships with a number of leading venture capitalists there.

To take Watson even further, today, IBM is greatly expanding our presence in this cradle of global technology innovation. We’re opening a Watson hub in San Francisco. This will put IBM closer to, and increase collaboration with, the local start ups, developers, venture capital groups, and academics we’re working with. We’ll host activities aimed at sparking a new wave of innovation built on advances in cognitive computing.

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Doug Schaedler, CEO, inno360

Doug Schaedler, CEO, inno360

By Doug Schaedler

I was recently describing inno360′s new software release and enhanced functionality to a c-suite executive at a global consumer packaged goods company. He was intrigued by the fact that our latest software, thanks in part to IBM’s Watson technology, has the ability to learn and push more relevant information to employees as they interact with it. He saw that in a short period of time our software could make his whole company smarter and more efficient.

The reaction of this prospective client bodes well for inno360 clients and our recent ecosystem partnership with IBM Watson to deliver Watson cognitive capability. Our software offers the ability for our clients to achieve rapid and enhanced return on investment, but also will increase our revenues and make our software mission critical to our global client base, of which 15 are the #1 ranked leaders in their respective global vertical industries.

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September 16th, 2015
16:05
 

Arvind Krishna, SVP and Dir., IBM Research

Arvind Krishna, SVP and Dir., IBM Research

By Arvind Krishna

Over the past two decades, the Internet, cloud computing and related technologies have revolutionized many aspects of business and society. These advances have made individuals and organizations more productive, and they have enriched many people’s lives.

Yet the basic mechanics of how people and organizations forge agreements with one another and execute them have not been updated for the 21st century. In fact, with each passing generation we’ve added more middlemen, more processes, more bureaucratic checks and balances, and more layers of complexity to our formal interactions–especially financial transactions. We’re pushing old procedures through new pipes.

This apparatus–the red tape of modern society–extracts a “tax” of many billions of dollars per year on the global economy and businesses.

What can be done? One potential solution is an intriguing technology called blockchain, which is little understood outside a small fraternity of computer scientists. Blockchain provides the technology underpinnings of Bitcoin, the crypto currency that has been the subject of much interest and speculation within the technical, business and law enforcement communities, and in society at large. (IBM is not involved in cryptocurrencies.)

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September 10th, 2015
9:01
 

Michael Rhodin, SVP, IBM Watson Group

Michael Rhodin, SVP, IBM Watson Group

By Michael Rhodin

When biomedical companies develop and test new products, they are required by law to employ management systems that prove that everything they do follows the rules concerning safety, quality and privacy. That includes the computers and software they use.

Because of the strict requirements, these industries have found it difficult to take advantage of one of the most important new capabilities the tech industry has to offer–cloud computing.

Today, IBM Watson Health is changing the game for the healthcare industry by introducing a new cloud service, IBM Watson Health Cloud for Life Science Compliance, which enables innovators to share data while maintaining and validating full compliance with federal regulations. For the first time, pharmaceutical and medical equipment companies can more easily move their core business activities to the cloud.

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Pat Toole, GM, IBM IoT

Pat Toole, GM, IBM Internet of Things

By Pat Toole

In the next few years, hundreds of billions of objects will be connected to the world’s information technology systems via the Internet of Things. That includes everything from the sensors on electricity grids and factory equipment to the fitness monitors we wear on our wrists and food items in the grocery store.

Yet, already, the vast quantities of data flowing from IoT devices are overwhelming the ability of many organizations to capture and make use of it.

That’s why the time has come to make the Internet of Things ready for business. By that I mean building an enterprise-class infrastructure capable of handling all this data and turning it into actionable insights when people need them.

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Saul Haro, CEO, Macrolynk

Saul Haro, CEO, Macrolynk

By Saul Haro

Sometimes the missing pieces of a puzzle can be right in front of you.

That’s how it was for me and my colleagues a few years ago. We were working in the supply chain and import/export group of a major automotive parts manufacturer and tasked with making sure operations moved smoothly.

It goes without saying that the automotive industry is huge, with hundreds of suppliers contributing parts and services to a single vehicle. But for context, consider that Toyota estimates the average car consists of about 30,000 individual parts – parts that have to be ordered, procured, shipped, delivered, received, installed, and tested. In this light, it’s easy to understand just how important managing the supply chain process can be to a successful production process. Continue Reading »

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Mark Gildersleeve, President, Business Division, The Weather Company

Mark Gildersleeve, President, Business Division, The Weather Company

The Weather Company delivers, on average, 15 billion weather forecasts to consumers and businesses every day. That’s an increase of more than 25-fold in the past five years, says Mark Gildersleeve, president of the business division of The Weather Company, which also owns the Weather Channel. The Weather Company is partnering with IBM to deliver those forecasts in real-time for 2.2 billion locations across the globe – a feat that would have been unthinkable without the recent advancements in cloud, mobile and data analytics. The Smarter Planet caught up with Gildersleeve to talk about how these new tools and technologies have improved forecasting and changed his business.  Continue Reading »

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Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President, IBM Systems

Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President, IBM Systems

By Tom Rosamilia

Fifteen years ago IBM did what must have seemed to some people like the unthinkable. We started shipping mainframe computers running Linux, the open source operating system.

It was a major step forward for the open software movement, and, for IBM, it marked a significant expansion for the mainframe–helping to establish it as a backbone of the digital economy.

Today, we’re launching another major advance. IBM is going all-in for open software on the mainframe, which is now called z Systems.

This expansion strategy has many moving parts, but the key thing is that it provides entrepreneurs and businesses that are building the future of computing with a powerful, secure and flexible platform for developing and running cloud services and mobile apps.

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Jimoh, right, and the original ROSS Intelligence team

Jimoh, right, and colleagues at ROSS Intelligence

By Steve Hamm

Just a few months ago, Jimoh Ovbiagele was a junior computer science major at the University of Toronto. Today, he’s the chief technology officer of ROSS Intelligence, a Toronto-based startup that’s harnessing IBM Watson in an attempt to transform the legal profession by streamlining case law research. This is no pipe dream: the software is being piloted by Dentons, the world’s largest law firm–giving it an industry stamp of approval.

“From the moment we had the opportunity to touch Watson, we saw that we could change a whole industry. So that’s what we set out to do,” Jimoh says.

Thanks to the IBM Watson Ecosystem, tiny startups like ROSS Intelligence can begin to disrupt the status quo in one industry after another–and in a matter of months. Continue Reading »

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