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Cloud Computing
November 21st, 2014
6:00
 

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research - Almaden

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research – Almaden

By Jeffrey Welser

One of the watershed moments in the history of computing took place on Dec. 9, 1968. Douglas Engelbart and his team at Stanford Research Institute presented a technology demonstration that included the first public showings of the computer mouse, hypertext, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration over a network. Those advances turned out to be essential building blocks for personal computing and Internet, and the event came to be called “The Mother of All Demos.”

While only history will say for sure, I think we saw the glimmer of a similar new beginning last week at IBM Research – Almaden, in Silicon Valley.  The IBM Cognitive Systems Colloquium signaled a shift from a singular focus on the von Neumann computing architecture, which has dominated computer science and the computer industry since the mid-1940s, to new architectures modeled on the human brain. Continue Reading »

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Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

By Jeff Schick

For more than 30 years, email has been stuck in a rut. It’s still basically a list of messages that we plow through all day, every day—in our private and professional lives.  The important stuff is hidden among the trivial and the routine. Sure, you can fiddle with rankings and do rudimentary searches, but, for all the time we spend dealing with our email, it’s one of the least-evolved computer activities around.  Think of it as a tax on your brain.

I probably speak for many people when I say that the first word that comes to mind when I think of email is “frustration.” Actually, the word that comes to mind is less polite than that. That high level of collective frustration is what drove a talented team of software engineers and user experience designers at IBM to reimagine the domain—putting people and relationships at the center of things. Continue Reading »

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John Kelly, SVP, IBM Research

Dr. John Kelly III, SVP, IBM Research

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

The microprocessor was one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Those chips of silicon and copper have come to play such a vital role that they’re frequently referred to as the “brains” of the computer. Today’s computer designs put the processor at the center.

But the needs of businesses and society are changing rapidly, so the computer industry must respond with a new approach to computer design—which we at IBM call data-centric computing. In the future, much of the processing will move to where the data resides, whether that’s within a single computer, in a network or out on the cloud. Microprocessors will still be vitally important, but their work will be divided up.

This shift is necessary because of the explosion of big data. Every day, society generates an estimated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data—everything from corporate ledgers to individual health records to personal Tweets.

Continue Reading »

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Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

By Michael Nova M.D.

To describe me as a health nut would be a gross understatement. I run five days a week, bench press 275 pounds, do 120 pushups at a time, and surf the really big waves in Indonesia. I don’t eat red meat, I typically have berries for breakfast and salad for dinner, and I consume an immense amount of kale—even though I don’t like the way it tastes. My daily vitamin/supplement regimen includes Alpha-lipoic acid, Coenzyme Q and Resveratrol. And, yes, I wear one of those fitness gizmos around my neck to count how many steps I take in a day.

I have been following this regimen for years, and it’s an essential part of my life.

For anybody concerned about health, diet and fitness, these are truly amazing times. There’s a superabundance of health and fitness information published online. We’re able to tap into our electronic health records, we can measure just about everything we do physically, and, thanks to the plummeting price of gene sequencing, we can map our complete genomes for as little as $3000 and get readings on smaller chunks of genomic data for less than $100.

Think of it as your own personal health big-data tsunami. Continue Reading »

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Glen Tona, IBM Software Developer and resident of Silicon Valley’s Rainbow Mansion

Glen Tona, IBM Software Developer and resident of Silicon Valley’s Rainbow Mansion

By Glen Tona

It’s undeniable that cloud is one of the most transformative technologies of the decade. From permeating our daily lives via social media to everyday use in business, the cloud is becoming an increasingly essential technology for driving creativity and collaboration, and is capable of altering the very fabric of society.

As the cloud market grows, it’s crucial to make it even more accessible and comprehensive for startups. Though almost all startups today are using the cloud in some capacity, as an industry, we can do more to open it up more broadly, and doing so will serve to level the competitive playing field for burgeoning companies and innovators globally.

Below are three ways we can help startups use cloud to its maximum potential: Continue Reading »

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November 5th, 2014
11:42
 

Professor Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

Dr. Ralf Steinmetz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt

By Dr. Ralf Steinmetz

Today there are more than 9 billion connected devices such as, smartphones, sensors and more around the world. That number is expected to grow to between 50 billion and a trillion within the next decade.

These connected devices are at the heart of the Internet of Things and contribute volumes to our society’s growing mountain of Big Data, which provide insights to everything from biometrics to energy consumption, and trends to preferences.

This increasingly unprecedented amount of data is driving dramatic changes across industries and requires a new level of power to process and analyze it all: the cloud. Continue Reading »

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Rainer Pirker, IBM MobileFirst Leader and Mobile Ambassador

Rainer Pirker, IBM MobileFirst Leader and Mobile Ambassador

By Rainer Pirker

The next wave of mobile adoption for universities will require more than mere investments in infrastructure to support the rising demand on WiFi – it will mean elevating the user experience by constantly evolving application design strategies that reflect and resonate with the changing preferences of students.

These designs are increasingly transactional, like mobile wallet functionality, and incorporate greater data analytics and social tie-ins that further refine and improve the user experience and deliver new services.

For example, creating a fulfilling, dynamic learning environment requires building on mobile engagement strategies that link to social communities to engage on other platforms that students rely on for information and collaboration. Continue Reading »

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SP Thomas Tsao

Thomas Tsao, Managing Partner, Gobi Partners

By Thomas Tsao

With China’s cloud market expected to top $160 billion (US) within the next year, it is no coincidence that it is becoming an emerging hotbed for major cloud vendors.

As a venture capitalist in China, I am particularly optimistic about opportunities in the cloud sector for both enterprises and startups.

Since 2009, Gobi Partners has been actively investing in cloud technologies. These investments have encompassed cloud infrastructure, platform and services.

In 2010, we made our first investment into a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) company, Gokuai, and have invested in four more since then. We see no end to the sector’s potential as the market continues to drive demand for cloud innovations, particularly those designed for enterprises. Continue Reading »

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SP Cog Coll 2014The world is in the early stages of a major shift—from the programmable computing era to the era of cognitive systems. Today at IBM Research, we’re convening our second-annual Cognitive Systems Colloquium. We’ll be hearing from some of the smartest people in the tech industry. Please return throughout the day for frequent updates. And join the discussion at #CognitiveComputing.

9:10  Zach Lemnios, vice president research strategy and worldwide operations:

We’re here to bring together researchers, clients, students, young entrepreneurs. We want to highlight the work of the past year and look at the challenges before us, and help to build an ecosystem to drive innovations in cognitive computing. How do we scale up this enterprise—how do we create ways for people to use these systems in ways that are very easy to use.

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Repsol Sovex Rig (Santos-Basin Bra

Repsol Sovex Rig (Santos Basin-Brazil).

By Steve Hamm

One of the great hopes for cognitive computing is that it will provide organizations with powerful new insights that enable them to penetrate complexity and rethink the way they do business—potentially transforming whole industries.

The oil and gas industry is ripe for transformation.

That’s because the uncertainties and geological risks are so great in resource exploration and the pressures are so great to maximize the productivity of existing oil and gas fields—whether they’re on dry land or thousands of feet under the sea.

Repsol S.A., a global energy company with its headquarters in Madrid, Spain, has teamed with IBM in a three-year collaboration to bring cognitive computing to bear on these so-called “upstream” aspects of its business, where energy companies face so much complexity and where decision making is so crucial to their success.

Continue Reading »

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