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Cognitive Computing

Ilya Tabakh, CEO, Edge Up Sports

Ilya Tabakh, CEO, Edge Up Sports

By Ilya Tabakh

Baseball still holds sway as America’s national pastime, but, for a certain slice of the population, Fantasy football is THE GAME. More than 33 million people play–obsessing over rosters, stats and injury reports for nearly six months of the year. Yet, as popular as Fantasy is, it could be even bigger if more of football’s 100+ million fans got involved.

That’s why my co-workers and I at Edge Up Sports have set out to change the way fans play the game. Our Edge Up platform, which we’re introducing today with a Kickstarter campaign, is designed to take the drudgery and stress out of managing a Fantasy football team. Continue Reading »

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Jimoh, right, and the original ROSS Intelligence team

Jimoh, right, and colleagues at ROSS Intelligence

By Steve Hamm

Just a few months ago, Jimoh Ovbiagele was a junior computer science major at the University of Toronto. Today, he’s the chief technology officer of ROSS Intelligence, a Toronto-based startup that’s harnessing IBM Watson in an attempt to transform the legal profession by streamlining case law research. This is no pipe dream: the software is being piloted by Dentons, the world’s largest law firm–giving it an industry stamp of approval.

“From the moment we had the opportunity to touch Watson, we saw that we could change a whole industry. So that’s what we set out to do,” Jimoh says.

Thanks to the IBM Watson Ecosystem, tiny startups like ROSS Intelligence can begin to disrupt the status quo in one industry after another–and in a matter of months. Continue Reading »

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Shahram Ebadollahi, Vice President, Innovations, IBM Watson Health

Shahram Ebadollahi, Vice President, Innovations, IBM Watson Health

By Shahram Ebadollahi

In IBM Watson’s early days, the cognitive computer was a whiz at words. It was designed to ingest vast amounts of documents and Web pages, understand words and their context, and answer free-form questions from people–offering up responses ranked by its confidence in their accuracy.

These days, we’re adding a wide variety of other types of data to Watson’s repertoire, perhaps most significantly, images–including photos, medical images and videos. Simply put, we’re teaching Watson to “see.”

A watershed moment in our effort to expand Watson’s visual capabilities comes today: we’ve announced our intention of acquiring Merge Healthcare Incorporated, a leading provider of medical image  handling and processing systems. It addresses radiology, cardiology, orthopedics eye care and other medical fields. The planned acquisition is subject to regulatory review and Merge shareholder approval and is anticipated to close later this year.

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Dr. Jose Morey

Dr. Jose Morey

By Steve Hamm
IBM Writer

Dr. Jose Morey has a full-time job as a radiologist with the U.S. Veterans Administration in Hampton, VA. He also teaches part-time at the University of Virginia and Eastern Virginia Medical School.  As if that wasn’t enough, he is helping IBM develop a system, Medical Sieve, aimed at assisting doctors to interpret medical images.

Why does he do it? “I have an eight-year-old son,” Jose says. “I tell him that someday a computer might help save his life. I’ll play a little part in that. And even when I’m gone it might help his kids. It’s a legacy thing.” Continue Reading »

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Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow

Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist, Brain-Inspired Computing

By Dharmendra S. Modha

For decades, computer scientists have been pursuing two elusive goals in parallel: engineering energy-efficient computers modeled on the human brain and designing smart computing systems that learn on their own—like humans do—and are not programmed like today’s computers. Both goals are now within reach.

And, today, as we launch our ecosystem for brain-inspired computing with a TrueNorth Boot Camp for academic and government researchers, I expect that the two quests will begin to converge. By the end of the intensive three-week training program, hopefully, early adopters will set out to show potential for these new technologies to transform industries and society.

The boot camp is a pivotal step in bringing brain-inspired computing to society by putting cutting-edge innovation in the hands of some of the best and brightest researchers who will begin to invent a wealth of applications and systems that we cannot even imagine today.

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John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

This week, President Obama issued an executive order establishing the National Strategic Computing Initiative with the goal of ensuring that the United States leads in the field of high-performance computing. The initiative is aimed at producing computers capable of exascale performance–which is one billion billion operations per second, orders of magnitude faster than today’s most powerful computers.

IBM has been a pacesetter in large-scale computing ever since modern computers emerged in the 1940s. We have collaborated with the US government in producing and deploying computers in the national laboratories and government agencies that help the country retain its leadership in science and commerce, as well as safeguarding national security. Continue Reading »

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SP John Kelly

John Kelly, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John Kelly III

World leaders from business, government and the non-profit sector are gathering this week in Nairobi, Kenya, for Global Entrepreneur Summit 2015, the first such summit to be held in sub-Saharan Africa. So it’s a good time to explore the potential for Africa and Africans to take advantage of the power of entrepreneurship and innovation to propel the continent forward.

IBM is committed to helping Africa fulfill it’s promise by providing information technologies to help address the continent’s challenges, through research collaborations with companies and universities, and by helping to foster innovation ecosystems in a number of cities. Continue Reading »

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Guru Banavar

Guru Banavar, VP, Cognitive Computing Research

By Guruduth Banavar

With thousands of scientists, engineers, and business leaders focused on cognitive computing across IBM Research and the IBM Watson Group, IBM is pursuing the most comprehensive effort in the tech industry to advance into the new era of computing. Nobody has more people on it, a broader array of research and development projects nor deeper expertise in so many of the most significant fields of inquiry.

Yet we understand that to accelerate progress in cognitive computing, we can’t do this alone. That’s why IBM has been pursuing a strategy of forming deep collaborative partnerships with academic scientists who are among the leaders in their fields as well as opening Watson as a technology platform for others to build on. Continue Reading »

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July 10th, 2015
13:42
 

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science, University of Montreal

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science,
University of Montreal

By Yoshua Bengio

Humans have long dreamed of creating machines that think. More than 100 years before the first programmable computer was built, inventors wondered whether devices made of rods and gears might become intelligent. And when Alan Turing, one of the pioneers of computing in the 1940s, set a goal for computer science, he described a test, later dubbed the Turing Test, which measured a computer’s performance against the behavior of humans.

In the early days of my academic field, artificial intelligence, scientists tackled problems that were difficult for humans but relatively easy for computers–such as large-scale mathematical calculations. In more recent years, we’re taking on tasks that are easy for people to perform but hard to describe to a machine–tasks humans solve “without thinking,” such as recognizing spoken words or faces in a crowd. Continue Reading »

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In the IBM fab.

In the SUNY NanoTech Complex fab.

By Mukesh Khare

It’s an important moment in the history of the electronics industry. Researchers from IBM Research, SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanotech Science + Engineering and partners including GlobalFoundries and Samsung have produced advances that will enable the semiconductor industry to pack about twice as many transistors on the chips that power everything from data-crunching servers to mobile devices.

Working together, we achieved an industry first–producing working test chips at New York’s SUNY NanoTech Complex near Albany whose smallest features approach 7 nanometers. As a result, the industry will be able to place more than 20 billion tiny switches on chips the size of a fingernail.

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