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Wayne Balta, Vice President, Environmental Affairs and Product Safety, IBM

Wayne Balta, Vice President, Environmental Affairs and Product Safety, IBM

By Wayne Balta

Creating a smarter planet means taking steps toward a more sustainable planet.

The EPA’s ENERGY STAR® program has been working toward this vision for years. These days, most people recognize the ENERGY STAR seal as a trusted sign of energy efficiency from seeing it on everything from light bulbs to refrigerators. But IBM’s involvement with ENERGY STAR goes all the way back to 1992 when we became a charter member of the ENERGY STAR Computer Program. Back then it was focused on personal computers. Today, however, in an era of the global internet, Big Data and analytics, ENERGY STAR is also addressing computer servers and data centers. Continue Reading »

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Ben Goldhirsch, Founder and CEO, GOOD

Ben Goldhirsh, Founder and CEO, GOOD

By Ben Goldhirsh

From businesses selling vegetables grown locally with less energy than those grown and shipped from different parts of the world, to companies creating sustainability objectives, the proliferation of the smartphone and green initiative apps are influencing, enabling and creating more responsible and sustainable business and consumption decisions.

In fact, as sustainability becomes a greater strategic initiative for organizations, more sophisticated apps are appearing to help them address such pressing objectives as sustainable sourcing, the paperless office, and supply chain management.

The first wave of sustainability apps was focused largely on consumers, providing guidance, for example, on reducing energy consumption at home. But this year, of the estimated more than 400 million green mobile application downloads, an increasing number of them will be aimed at corporate green initiatives and sustainability. Continue Reading »

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Lisa Mandell, President, TrendPoint Systems

Lisa Mandell, President, TrendPoint Systems

By Lisa Mandell

Much has been said and written about the need to optimize the data centers of the world to be more efficient and less costly, especially in a down economy. And while the discussions have generally centered on technology solutions, such as virtualization, de-duplication, thin provisioning, etc., there is a growing need to not only explore, but to strategically think about data center power consumption.

In this age of Big Data analytics, “visibility” into the inner workings of the data center is not only possible, it’s critical. Both great savings and improved performance can result from getting control of, and fine-tuning data center systems. But it takes accurate data, robust analysis and a will to act on the results to make it happen. Continue Reading »

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Keith Walker, Master Inventor, IBM

Keith Walker, Master Inventor, IBM

By Keith Walker

Cloud. It’s the IT world’s darling. It’s fast, efficient, distributed computing that makes it possible to do everything from bank online to start a business. But despite all this goodness, could the cloud actually have a negative impact on…the environment?

After all, the actual “computing” has to happen somewhere and usually it’s in massive datacenters with thousands of power-hungry servers, network equipment and other infrastructure components.

Never fear, tree-hugging, EV-driving IT friends. IBM’s patent 8,549,125 gives cloud computing a “green” button that can distribute cloud service workloads to low-powered or under-utilized systems to minimize its environmental footprint. Continue Reading »

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Mike Ray, Vice President, Business Integration & Transformation, Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

Mike Ray, Vice President, Business Integration & Transformation, Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

By Mike Ray

It started 40 years ago, before it was trendy or being taught in business school.

Thomas J. Watson, Jr., IBM Chairman at the time, said: “We accept our responsibilities as a corporate citizen in community, national and world affairs; we serve our interests best when we serve the public interest…We want to be in the forefront of those companies which are working to make our world a better place.”  That was 1969.

IBM’s values shape and define our company and permeate all of our relationships; between our employees and our shareholders, our clients, the communities where our employees live and work, and among our network of suppliers. Continue Reading »

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By Harry van Dorenmalen
Chairman, IBM Europe

Recently, IBM detailed two new computers that will help change the way the world, literally, works.

The first, Sequoia, is the world’s most powerful supercomputer, capable of calculating in one hour what would otherwise take 6.7 billion people using hand calculators 320 years to complete if they worked non-stop. It is installed at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

The second is the first commercial machine, cooled by hot water, built for the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre in Germany. It will be used by scientists across Europe to drive a wide range of research ­­− from simulating the blood flow behind an artificial heart valve, to devising quieter aeroplanes.

What’s impressive about these machines is not just their massive processing power alone, but  they are remarkably energy efficient, too.

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Tune in today at 11:30 a.m. EDT for live blogging from the D.C. event, Big Data: The New Natural Resource. Follow @IBMPolicy on Twitter, and Tweet to #BigData and #IBMPolicy.

By Frederick Streitz, director of Lawrence Livermore National Lab’s High Performance Computing Innovation Center

We live in a time of tough economic competition that demands industry and business respond to global market forces as quickly and efficiently as possible. At stake is American leadership in technology as well as other industrial and business domains.

There is growing international recognition of the important role high performance computing (HPC) can play in the innovation that is critical to economic competitiveness. We need only look at the Top500 list of the world’s most powerful computers over the last five years to see that supercomputing is seen as an essential tool for scientific discovery and an engine of technology innovation from France, Italy, Germany and Spain to India, China and Japan.

From a federal government perspective, the competitiveness of American business and industry has become a matter of national security. Continued US leadership in science and technology is considered by many to be critical to the nation’s security and economic prosperity.

In line with this growing recognition, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and IBM are broadening a highly productive 20-year partnership to make HPC and domain expertise in science and engineering available to US industry. LLNL and IBM have formed Deep Computing Solutions, a collaboration that aims to help US companies use HPC capabilities and expertise, at a level previously only available to national research laboratories, to improve their competitiveness in the global marketplace.

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The Top500 ranking of supercomputers today recognized  the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Sequoia as the fastest computer in the world. The computer, an IBM Blue Gene/Q, was designed to be extremely energy efficient. Like previous Blue Gene machines, it’s powered by low frequency and low power embedded PowerPC cores–in this case, an astonishing 1.6 million of them. Sequoia produces 16 petaflops of computation muscle. That’s 16 quadrillion operations per second. It’s an important stepping stone on the way to exascale computing–machines that will be 50 times as fast as today’s fastest.

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Read a related post on the IBM Research blog.

 

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Energy use in data centers accounts for 2% of electricity consumption in the United States and 1.2% worldwide,  according to a new report by Stanford University professor Jonathan Koomey. While that’s a relatively small slice of overall energy usage, it’s a lot of megawatts. So the pressure is on to come up with ways to make data centers less energy hungry.

A couple of IBM scientists think they’ve found a smart way to do that. Kota Murali and Roger Schmidt are the brains behind the Holistic Green Data Center–an integrated package of technologies designed to bring solar energy to data centers, avoid energy-sapping DC-to-AC power conversions and use water for cooling by running it directly under the microprocessors in server computers.

Each of the pieces by itself could create significant energy savings. Taken together, they offer the potential of transforming the way data centers are designed in sunny locations and greatly expanding the availability and lowering the cost of computing in developing countries in Africa, South Asia and the Middle East.

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Burlington PumpingLike many good business ideas, IBM’s plunge into water management technology started with its own pain. The story is told in Charles Fishman’s new book, The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water. Fishman warns that the era of easy water is over. “The new water scarcity will reshape how we live, how we work, how we relax. It will reshape how we value water, and how we understand it,” Fishman writes. The managers at IBM’s chip plant just outside Burlington, Vt., had their consciousness reshaped before many others did. Water is plentiful for them, but they use a lot of it and the water they use has to be ultra-pure, so it’s mighty expensive.

At the Burlington plant, IBM creates huge quantities of purified water for washing delicate components during the semiconductor manufacturing process–1.7 million gallons a day.  The bill for purified water is nearly $10,000 per day, including the cost of water, chemicals and energy. It used to be much higher–more like $20,000. But, starting more than a decade ago, under pressure to cut costs, IBM’s managers realized that situation was unsustainable. So they launched a water management initiative that ultimately became a data-rich system for managing all of the water used in the plant. And that system grew up to be the company’s Smarter Water business. “Burlington has helped IBM change the way it thinks about itself,” writes Fishman. “IBM wants to do for its customers–for companies, for cities, for utilities, for whole natural ecosystems–what it has done in IBM Burlington.”

For IBM, natural resource management has evolved over the past decade from an internal discipline into an expression of global advocacy. The company’s annual corporate social responsibility report lays out the internal benefits of conservation and environmental sustainability.  For instance, IBM saved over $50 million in electricity expenses and conserved 523,000 megawatt hours of electricity since 2008.  The company’s global conservation program involves 3,100 conservation projects at more than 350 IBM facilities in 49 countries.  Conservation is a good investment, too. Over the years, IBM estimates that its focus on environmental sustainability has realized savings and avoided costs at a rate of approximately $1.60 for every $1.00 spent.

As the Smarter Planet business initiatives continue to develop, those savings will increasingly be supplemented with new revenues.  IBM’s experience points to a big, convenient truth: conservation is good for business.

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