Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
IBM Research
February 23rd, 2015
8:05
 

Neighbourgoods Market, Johannesburg, South Africa

Neighbourgoods Market, Johannesburg, South Africa

By Steve Hamm
IBM Chief Storyteller

The Braamfontein district was once the corporate heart of Johannesburg. Then, in late 1980’s, businesses started moving out of the neighborhood, initiating two decades of decay.

But today, Braamfontein is undergoing an amazing rebirth. Entrepreneurs are transforming abandoned buildings into trendy restaurants and shops as well as arts, culture and business centers. Young hipsters and entrepreneurs mix with students and tourists. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Bill Grady, IBM Brand Strategist

Bill Grady, IBM Brand Strategist

By Bill Grady

We prefer texting to phone calls and we expect integrated and seamless experiences with technology. We are the first generation to have grown up in the midst of a digital revolution, where information and answers are just a few clicks away. We are Millennials.

There’s been a lot written about Millennials. This generation, born roughly between 1980 and 1995, is already the largest in the workforce and will make up 75% of the world’s workforce by 2030. The change is disruptive.

Most articles about Millennials delve into dating culture, digital lives and even eating habits. Yet among all of that chatter, there is very little understood about what impact we are having in the workplace. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
February 13th, 2015
13:35
 

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

Shanker Ramamurthy, Global Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services

By Shanker Ramamurthy

In today’s world, it can be difficult to stay abreast of the latest technological trends and distinguish true opportunities from over-hyped fads.

Despite tremendous advances in cognitive computing capabilities, organizations have only begun to scratch the surface of potential for this innovative technology.

From improving customer engagement to enhancing research capabilities that identify new, life-saving medical treatments, the potential value of cognitive-based solutions is boundless.

The first in a series of reports based on research from the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) study, Your Cognitive Future, identifies multiple opportunities across industries to apply cognitive computing today, as well as examines how the technology will evolve. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
February 10th, 2015
8:00
 

SoftBank's Watson-based robot

SoftBank’s Watson-based robot.

By Michael Karasick

When IBM Watson was first created, it was designed to use English and to answer “factoid” questions. Since then, as we expand Watson’s capabilities to transform industries and professions, we are adapting it for other languages and forging strategic alliances to accelerate adoption globally.

Our alliance with Japan’s SoftBank, announced today, is a powerful example of both of those imperatives at work.

SoftBank, one of the most innovative companies in Japan, has signed on as our strategic partner to help introduce Watson and cognitive computing to the world’s third-largest economy. We’re working with SoftBank to train Watson to “think in” Japanese, and SoftBank will build a powerful ecosystem of partners, including entrepreneurs, app developers and venture investors; as well as take its own Watson-based applications and services to market. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
February 6th, 2015
4:00
 

Solomon Assefa, IBM, and Zeblon Vilakaz, Wits University

Solomon Assefa, IBM, and Zeblon Vilakaz, Wits University

By Solomon Assefa

When I first visited South Africa more than a year ago from IBM’s research center in New York, I was impressed with the advanced level of science and technology in the country. The country boasts four Nobel laureates in science and medicine and some of the world’s best research organizations.

Among them is the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH). IBM Research is working with them to address one of Africa’s most pressing problems: Tuberculosis. TB is the leading cause of death in South Africa. Roughly half a million people contract the disease each year, and, according to the World Health Organization, 80 percent of the country’s young adults are infected, which exacerbates the spread of HIV. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Katie Keating, Social Content and Engagement Strategist, IBM

Katie Keating, Social Content and Engagement Strategist, IBM

By Katie Keating

Brands live in fear of the errant tweet, the insulting Facebook post, the lewd Instagram photo. And sometimes they are hacked. Sometimes a disgruntled employee does act out of spite. But all too often those social media gaffes come down to user error: a human juggling several channels – including their personal accounts – and hitting the wrong button, for the wrong site, at the wrong time.

A colleague of mine, software developer Aaron Quirk, and I submitted the patent “Preventing Messages From Being Sent Using Inappropriate Communication Accounts” to prevent just such embarrassments. Using natural language processing and the Bluemix cloud service, the invention monitors your activity across your email, social channels and more and “learns” your voice over time. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
January 21st, 2015
3:00
 

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

By Florian Pinel

IBM Watson, the same cognitive computing system that has been put to work in healthcare, insurance, and retail, and which debuted the world’s first cognitive cooking food truck at SXSW last year, will soon be coming to your kitchen counter in the form of a new cookbook put together by IBM and The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

The cookbook is a result of IBM’s two-year collaboration with culinary partner, ICE, to pair the recipe expertise of world-class chefs with the cognitive power of Watson to generate never-before-seen recipes, many of which will be included in the cookbook, available April 14. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

One of our young inventors grew up in a small town in rural South Carolina; another came from Bangladesh; and a third got hooked on computers at age seven in Haifa, Israel. What these three have in common is their youthful optimism and their dedication to one of IBM’s core values: innovation that matters for our company and the world.

This is no empty slogan: Today, IBM announced that it received a record 7,534 US patents in 2014, marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the list of US patent recipients. Amazingly, on average, we receive more than one new US patent for every hour of every work day.

Hidden behind the raw statistics is an exciting insight: IBM’s young scientists, software programmers and engineers are making important contributions to the company’s innovation achievements. (Thoughts? Tweet to #patent, #invent.)
Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
November 21st, 2014
6:00
 

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research - Almaden

Jeffrey Welser, Dir., IBM Research – Almaden

By Jeffrey Welser

One of the watershed moments in the history of computing took place on Dec. 9, 1968. Douglas Engelbart and his team at Stanford Research Institute presented a technology demonstration that included the first public showings of the computer mouse, hypertext, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration over a network. Those advances turned out to be essential building blocks for personal computing and Internet, and the event came to be called “The Mother of All Demos.”

While only history will say for sure, I think we saw the glimmer of a similar new beginning last week at IBM Research – Almaden, in Silicon Valley.  The IBM Cognitive Systems Colloquium signaled a shift from a singular focus on the von Neumann computing architecture, which has dominated computer science and the computer industry since the mid-1940s, to new architectures modeled on the human brain. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

John Kelly, SVP, IBM Research

Dr. John Kelly III, SVP, IBM Research

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

The microprocessor was one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Those chips of silicon and copper have come to play such a vital role that they’re frequently referred to as the “brains” of the computer. Today’s computer designs put the processor at the center.

But the needs of businesses and society are changing rapidly, so the computer industry must respond with a new approach to computer design—which we at IBM call data-centric computing. In the future, much of the processing will move to where the data resides, whether that’s within a single computer, in a network or out on the cloud. Microprocessors will still be vitally important, but their work will be divided up.

This shift is necessary because of the explosion of big data. Every day, society generates an estimated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data—everything from corporate ledgers to individual health records to personal Tweets.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Subscribe to this category Subscribe to IBM Research