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Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

by Guillermo Cecchi

Patterns are everywhere. Benoit Mandelbrot found them in nature, and gave us fractals. And now computer systems and algorithms find them in data, like how Watson teases out relevant information in just about anything. Machines can even find patterns in speech to accurately predict psychosis onset in high-risk youths, as colleagues and I explain in a recent Nature Publishing Journals – Schizophrenia article, Automated Analysis of Free Speech Predicts Psychosis Onset in High-Risk Youths.

About 1 percent of the population between the age of 14 and 27 is at clinically high risk, or CHR, for experiencing a psychotic episode at some point in their lives. One percent might not sound like much, but a statistically significant 30 percent of those known CHR individuals will have an episode. This led me to work with academic and clinical psychiatrists to apply machine learning to the data – in the form of transcribed interviews – to find patterns that would accurately predict that 30 percent. Continue Reading »

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Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow

Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist, Brain-Inspired Computing

By Dharmendra S. Modha

For decades, computer scientists have been pursuing two elusive goals in parallel: engineering energy-efficient computers modeled on the human brain and designing smart computing systems that learn on their own—like humans do—and are not programmed like today’s computers. Both goals are now within reach.

And, today, as we launch our ecosystem for brain-inspired computing with a TrueNorth Boot Camp for academic and government researchers, I expect that the two quests will begin to converge. By the end of the intensive three-week training program, hopefully, early adopters will set out to show potential for these new technologies to transform industries and society.

The boot camp is a pivotal step in bringing brain-inspired computing to society by putting cutting-edge innovation in the hands of some of the best and brightest researchers who will begin to invent a wealth of applications and systems that we cannot even imagine today.

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John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John E. Kelly III

This week, President Obama issued an executive order establishing the National Strategic Computing Initiative with the goal of ensuring that the United States leads in the field of high-performance computing. The initiative is aimed at producing computers capable of exascale performance–which is one billion billion operations per second, orders of magnitude faster than today’s most powerful computers.

IBM has been a pacesetter in large-scale computing ever since modern computers emerged in the 1940s. We have collaborated with the US government in producing and deploying computers in the national laboratories and government agencies that help the country retain its leadership in science and commerce, as well as safeguarding national security. Continue Reading »

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SP John Kelly

John Kelly, Senior Vice President, IBM

By Dr. John Kelly III

World leaders from business, government and the non-profit sector are gathering this week in Nairobi, Kenya, for Global Entrepreneur Summit 2015, the first such summit to be held in sub-Saharan Africa. So it’s a good time to explore the potential for Africa and Africans to take advantage of the power of entrepreneurship and innovation to propel the continent forward.

IBM is committed to helping Africa fulfill it’s promise by providing information technologies to help address the continent’s challenges, through research collaborations with companies and universities, and by helping to foster innovation ecosystems in a number of cities. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Hendrik Hamann. Physical Analytics manager, IBM Research

Dr. Hendrik Hamann. manager, Physical Analytics at IBM Research

By Hendrik Hamann

Five years ago, a few of my IBM Research colleagues and I played a hunch. Large-scale solar power was taking off, but we realized that for solar to fulfill its potential for helping to produce a more sustainable energy future, it would have to be integrated into electrical grids. For that to work, you would have to know ahead to time how much solar power would be generated when and where. That realization spawned our solar forecasting research project.

Today, we have shown that we can generate accurate forecasts of solar energy (from minutes ahead to many days ahead), which in turn can have a significant impact on the energy business – and on the future of sustainable energy. Our preliminary findings, including a test conducted at ISO-New England, the grid operator serving Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont, show that our system can be 30 percent more accurate than other state-of-the-art approaches. Continue Reading »

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Evans Kidero, Governor, Nairobi County

Evans Kidero, Governor, Nairobi County

By Evans Kidero

Next week, Nairobi will host the Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES), attended by U.S. President Obama. This will be the first time that the GES takes places in sub-Saharan Africa bringing together emerging entrepreneurs and leaders from government, private companies and international organizations from across Africa and around the world.

This is a proud moment for Nairobi and for me as its first governor. This city, which started out as a railway depot more than a century ago, today accounts for nearly 50 percent of Kenya’s formal employment and generates more than half of the country’s GDP.

Nairobi is now recognized as a trailblazer in Africa for its efforts to modernize its economy and city services. Our thriving tech scene is seen as a leader on the continent, giving rise to Kenya’s “Silicon Savannah” moniker and the strong culture of innovation and entrepreneurship that we are becoming recognized for globally. Continue Reading »

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July 11th, 2015
8:00
 

Roman Vaculin, PhD, IBM Research staff member

Roman Vaculin, PhD, IBM Research staff member

by Roman Vaculin

Want to know how far Novac Djokovic ran in his second-round match against Jarkko Nieminen? IBM’s SlamTracker knows (1,647.9 meters). While SlamTracker keeps up with every bit of on-court action at Wimbledon, this year my team at IBM Research added analysis of what happens online, off the court – even what’s going to happen – as part of the All England Club’s digital experience.

Our analytics, which is part of the Wimbledon Social Command Center, now pulls in social media data and identifies in real-time the most engaging and influential voices around Wimbledon and tennis. And our predictive analytics, using keywords, hashtags, and other online sources, helps us understand the effectiveness and the topics of content fans find most interesting, and also helps the All England Lawn Tennis Club and Wimbledon content creators proactively, and effectively target their online communications. Continue Reading »

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Guru Banavar

Guru Banavar, VP, Cognitive Computing Research

By Guruduth Banavar

With thousands of scientists, engineers, and business leaders focused on cognitive computing across IBM Research and the IBM Watson Group, IBM is pursuing the most comprehensive effort in the tech industry to advance into the new era of computing. Nobody has more people on it, a broader array of research and development projects nor deeper expertise in so many of the most significant fields of inquiry.

Yet we understand that to accelerate progress in cognitive computing, we can’t do this alone. That’s why IBM has been pursuing a strategy of forming deep collaborative partnerships with academic scientists who are among the leaders in their fields as well as opening Watson as a technology platform for others to build on. Continue Reading »

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July 10th, 2015
13:42
 

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science, University of Montreal

Yoshua Bengio, Professor of Computer Science,
University of Montreal

By Yoshua Bengio

Humans have long dreamed of creating machines that think. More than 100 years before the first programmable computer was built, inventors wondered whether devices made of rods and gears might become intelligent. And when Alan Turing, one of the pioneers of computing in the 1940s, set a goal for computer science, he described a test, later dubbed the Turing Test, which measured a computer’s performance against the behavior of humans.

In the early days of my academic field, artificial intelligence, scientists tackled problems that were difficult for humans but relatively easy for computers–such as large-scale mathematical calculations. In more recent years, we’re taking on tasks that are easy for people to perform but hard to describe to a machine–tasks humans solve “without thinking,” such as recognizing spoken words or faces in a crowd. Continue Reading »

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In the IBM fab.

In the SUNY NanoTech Complex fab.

By Mukesh Khare

It’s an important moment in the history of the electronics industry. Researchers from IBM Research, SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanotech Science + Engineering and partners including GlobalFoundries and Samsung have produced advances that will enable the semiconductor industry to pack about twice as many transistors on the chips that power everything from data-crunching servers to mobile devices.

Working together, we achieved an industry first–producing working test chips at New York’s SUNY NanoTech Complex near Albany whose smallest features approach 7 nanometers. As a result, the industry will be able to place more than 20 billion tiny switches on chips the size of a fingernail.

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