Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
IBM Research

IBM_Watson_AvatarThe era of cognitive computing is upon us. Scientists and engineers are designing new systems that ingest vast amounts of information, learn from their interactions with people and data, reason, and help us make better decisions. The opportunities are vast, but so are the challenges. That’s why fulfilling the promise of cognitive computing will require contributions from a large number of people in industry, academia, government and civic life.

So please join the New York Academy of Sciences, ETH Zurich and IBM as they present a discussion between Lino Guzzella, president-elect of ETH, the MIT of Europe; and John Kelly, senior vice president and director of IBM Research, the largest corporate research organization in the world. They will speak about research and collaboration to advance cognitive computing. View the discussion on this Livestream site at 7 p.m. And join the Twitter conversation at #CognitiveComputing, #ETH and #ZHNY.

 

Bookmark and Share

Jamie Garcia, IBM Research scientist

Jamie Garcia, IBM Research scientist

By Steve Hamm

When scientists succeed at IBM Research, they tend to stay. Robert Dennard, the inventor of the DRAM, for instance, had been at IBM for 56 years when he retired earlier this year. But there are researchers at the opposite end of the seniority spectrum who are already making their marks—on IBM and the world.

One of them is Jeannette “Jamie” Garcia, a 31-year-old chemist who became a full-time employee at IBM Research just last November—after a one-year stint as a post-doctoral fellow. Jamie has done something quite remarkable: she spearheaded the invention of a new class of materials, which have the potential to shake up the aerospace, auto and semiconductor industries.

Jamie’s team at IBM Research – Almaden, which is led by chemistry pioneer James Hedrick, completed the work on the new class of polymers. Their advances were made public for the first time in an article published today in Science magazine.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Tal Rabin

Tal Rabin, Manager of Cryptographic Research, IBM Research

“In most cases of security breaches, it’s not the cryptography that’s the problem. It’s the implementation,” said IBM’s Manager of Cryptographic Research Tal Rabin.

She’s referring to the cryptography used to protect our online lives – passwords, two-factor authentication, etc. The implementation is the software built around that cryptography – websites, email, etc. Holes in the latter allow hackers to circumvent the former.

Tal, whose career of writing and developing sophisticated cryptographic protocols has led to a New York Times feature, World Science Festival presentation, an appearance on WNYC’s The Takeaway’s Science Fair, and most-recently the Anita Borg Institute’s “Women of Vision” award, started out studying computer science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem with the goal, as she puts it, “to get a tech job.” Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

natgeo_pandacover

By Chris Sciacca

To create more energy-efficient clouds, crunch Big Data faster and design smaller, instrumented devices for a smarter planet, we need a new generation of technologies. This new generation will require even further improvements at the nano-scale to create more efficient transistors.

But before these microscopic technologies go into mass production, new techniques are needed for creating microscopic prototypes smaller than 30 nanometers — the size when prototyping becomes increasingly difficult. In 2010 IBM scientists published a paper in the peer-reviewed journal of Science demonstrating the technique by designing a nano-sized map of the world and now in 2014 the research is coming to market. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

SP dverma

Dr. Dinesh Verma, IBM Fellow

To say mobile data traffic is getting congested would be the understatement of at least the last year. That’s because in that span of time, traffic from mobile devices has grown 81 percent. To help manage this data tsunami and keep information flowing, Dr. Dinesh Verma, IBM Fellow, worked on technologies applying IT principles to wireless networks. He and his wife, Paridhi Verma, Government and Education Marketing Manager at IBM, put their findings in a new book, Techniques for Surviving Mobile Data Explosion, that details the challenge and solution. The Smarter Planet blog caught up with Verma recently for more insight.

Smarter Planet: How much mobile data are we talking about?
Dinesh Verna: A huge amount of mobile data! As a sample point, global mobile data traffic grew 81 percent in 2013, and by the end of 2013 had reached 1.5 exabytes per month. That’s up from 820 petabytes per month at the end of 2012.

To provide some perspective, the total amount of data transferred in one full year on the Internet was about 1 exabyte just a decade ago, in 2004.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

By Steve Hamm

IBM Researcher Stuart Parkin

IBM Researcher Stuart Parkin

A few years ago, when IBM Fellow Stuart Parkin first met Claudia Felser, a formidable scientist who is now his fiance, he risked offending her by dismissing some of  her ideas out of hand. “I told her the thing she was working on made no sense at all, but I’ve changed my mind,” he says. “I’m prone to make snap judgments. Sometimes I’m right; sometimes I’m wrong.”

In his own field, solid-state physics, he’s been right more often than not. In fact, he’s being recognized today with the Millennium Technology Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious science honors, by Technology Academy Finland. Previous recipients included Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, and Linus Torvalds, creator of the core elements of Linux, the popular open-source operating system. The Academy cited Stuart’s discoveries in disk drive technology, which have enabled a one-thousand fold increase in the storage capacity of disk drives over the past two decades. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

By Chris Nay, IBM Research Communications

ASPcollege_hoopsEvery year, top U.S. men’s college basketball teams enter a month-long tournament for a chance to be crowned champion. And it always stirs up fan and pundit predictions to pick potential winners of all 63 games.

To really give the pot a stir this year, Berkshire Hathaway, Quicken Loans and Yahoo Sports teamed up to create the Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge. Choose every match up correctly and win $1B.

While the odds of picking a perfect bracket in the challenge were steep, it didn’t put off millions of basketball fans everywhere from filling out brackets. However, it only took 48 hours, 25 games (and several upsets) for every bracket to be eliminated. (See an infographic that breaks down the bracket data.)

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

By Alicia Buksar, IBM Communications

As a teenager parking cars at a Fort Lauderdale country club, IBM customer analytics consulting leader Mike Haydock picked up much more than just tips.

Take the life lesson he received one day from Academy Award winning actor George C. Scott. “He gave me a tremendous insight on how he got into the role of Patton,” Haydock said. “He told me he became that role. He became Patton. That’s how he was able to pull that performance off.”

Haydock says he applies that same philosophy to his own work with clients. “I start to think like them,” he said. “So I know everything about the problem they’re trying to solve and probably more.”

That immersive approach has made Haydock, known as the ‘Math Maestro,’ one of IBM’s most sought after analytics experts, a demand that is likely to grow now that he has been named an IBM Fellow. The Fellow designation acknowledges an employee’s important contributions as well as their industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

By Manny Schecter

The U.S. has endured numerous economic eras — farming, machines, manufacturing, transportation, and so on.  Why has the U.S. economy survived and, more importantly, thrived throughout these periods?  Were we just inherently gifted farmers?  Were we all mechanically inclined?  Are we experts at efficiency?  If not, what then?

Our economy has proven flexible enough to successfully transition from one era to the next, but how?  The answer lies not in details about the eras themselves, but in the innovation that enabled and sustained them.  That is, the U.S. has been a leading innovator in each economic era.  We are curious.  We are creative.  We are inventive.  And this innovative spirit has been the common thread throughout.

Another reason why our nation has successfully navigated numerous economic eras is we have the most robust patent system in the world.  The patent system is an engine for innovation.  Specifically designed to promote innovation, the patent system provides the protection needed to ensure creative endeavors are not misappropriated by others who have not shouldered the same development expense.  To allow otherwise would advantage copycats over inventors. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

By Steve Hamm

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Aleksandra “Saska” Mojsilovic grew up in the former Yugoslavia before it splintered into nine nations, and, by the time she graduated with a PhD in  electrical engineering from the University of Belgrade in 1997, “The world I knew didn’t exist anymore,” she says. Today, as a scientist at the IBM Research lab in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., she’s making it possible for people to understand how the world works much more deeply than every before–so they can transcend traditional boundaries and make better decisions in their private and professional lives. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Subscribe to this category Subscribe to IBM Research