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Selfie: Angel and IBMers

Angel Diaz, IBM Vice President, Cloud Technology & Architecture, with other young IBMers.

By Angel Diaz

When I was a young guy growing up on a farm in Puerto Rico, I was a neophyte when it came to computer science and mathematics.  I was so fortunate at an early age to be empowered by my mother to reach further. At 17, I left for college in America.

Back then, people growing up in less-developed places didn’t have much chance of succeeding in technology unless we left home and headed for major tech meccas such as Silicon Valley, New York and Boston.

But things are different today, thanks in part to cloud computing. This new approach to technology creates tremendous opportunities for young people everywhere to build services and mobile apps on ready-made cloud platforms–either as entrepreneurs or as employees of larger companies. Continue Reading »

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Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer, IBM

By Kyu Rhee, MD, MPP

There was an interesting decision to make within IBM about what to call a new business organization that we’re announcing today. Should it be named Watson Health or Watson Healthcare?

“Health” is an aspiration, for individuals and society. “Healthcare” describes an industry primarily focused on treating diseases.

While healthcare is essential, it represents just one of many factors that determine whether people live long and healthy lives. Some other critical factors are genetics, geography, behaviors, social/environmental influences, education, and economics.  Unless society takes all of these factors into account and puts the individual at the center of the healthcare system, we won’t be able to make large-scale progress in helping people feel better and live longer. So, Watson Health it is. Continue Reading »

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Steve Hamm, Chief Storyteller, IBM

Steve Hamm, Chief Storyteller, IBM

By Steve Hamm

Last November in a championship powerboat race off Key West, Florida, Nigel Hook, skipper of Lucas Oil 77, was knifing along at more than 140 mph when he got a heads up from his support team that one of the main batteries was about to fail. That would have left the boat dead in the water. Instead, Nigel quickly switched to another battery and completed the race–finishing in 3rd place.

How did the support team know the battery was about to fail? Lucas Oil 77 is not only a monster of a motorboat; it’s also a node on the Internet of Things. Hundreds of sensors attached to the engines, navigation system and crew members monitor their health and beam the data wirelessly into the cloud, where it’s analyzed, and, when the system spots trouble, Nigel and the support team get alerts. Continue Reading »

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March 31st, 2015
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By Joel Cawley

As climate change advances, the frequency and severity of weather and climate disasters is increasing. That’s bad news for all of us, and it’s particularly dire for the people who lose property or loved ones as a result.

But what if insurance companies had much more timely and detailed understanding of weather events as they happened? They could help people avoid the worst and recover more quickly when they’re hit hard.

Imagine this scenario: A string of tornados is heading toward a city. An insurance company, supplied with a stream of real time weather information, issues up-to-the-minute alerts to its customers with more details about the path of the tornados than they can get on TV. Immediately after the twisters whip through the area, the company sends out text messages to policyholders inquiring about their safety. It asks customers to send photos of damage through a smartphone app. Continue Reading »

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Ido Wiesenberg, Vice President of TV and Media, Kaltura

Ido Wiesenberg, Vice President of TV and Media, Kaltura

By Ido Wiesenberg

The television experience is changing before our eyes and morphing to fit today’s viewers and their viewing habits.

For starters, TV is becoming personal, allowing each family member to enjoy a different flavor of TV. Imagine a TV that recognizes you – the viewer – and offers personal discovery of content based on your taste, your favorites, your likes and your friends.

Utilizing crowd sourcing tools, each viewer finds the most relevant and personal content. TV is already everywhere – on our smartphone, tablet, web browser, set-top box and virtually on any connected device. The next frontier is Cloud TV that provides a seamless experience across devices and are targeted to our own identity, preferences and social circles as one. Continue Reading »

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