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IBM Watson
January 21st, 2015
3:00
 

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

By Florian Pinel

IBM Watson, the same cognitive computing system that has been put to work in healthcare, insurance, and retail, and which debuted the world’s first cognitive cooking food truck at SXSW last year, will soon be coming to your kitchen counter in the form of a new cookbook put together by IBM and The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

The cookbook is a result of IBM’s two-year collaboration with culinary partner, ICE, to pair the recipe expertise of world-class chefs with the cognitive power of Watson to generate never-before-seen recipes, many of which will be included in the cookbook, available April 14. Continue Reading »

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Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

Bri Connelly, student, The University of Texas at Austin

By Bri Connelly

I just got back to Austin from a whirlwind trip to New York City where my classmates from The University of Texas at Austin and I stayed in an Airbnb on the Lower East Side, visited the September 11 Memorial and ate meals at as many different restaurants as we could pack into a short stay. The centerpiece of the trip, though, was the day we spent at IBM Watson Group headquarters at 51 Astor Place competing in the first-ever IBM Watson University Competition.

Last Friday, we were among teams from eight notable universities who showcased prototype apps we had built using Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing technology.  It was like being on an episode of Shark Tank – the judging was really tough. And our app won!

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Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

One of our young inventors grew up in a small town in rural South Carolina; another came from Bangladesh; and a third got hooked on computers at age seven in Haifa, Israel. What these three have in common is their youthful optimism and their dedication to one of IBM’s core values: innovation that matters for our company and the world.

This is no empty slogan: Today, IBM announced that it received a record 7,534 US patents in 2014, marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the list of US patent recipients. Amazingly, on average, we receive more than one new US patent for every hour of every work day.

Hidden behind the raw statistics is an exciting insight: IBM’s young scientists, software programmers and engineers are making important contributions to the company’s innovation achievements. (Thoughts? Tweet to #patent, #invent.)
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December 30th, 2014
16:22
 

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

By Dr. Bertalan Meskó

Simply having access to the information that patients or medical professionals actually need could be the biggest milestone in the history of medicine.

Even in the modern era, we are struggling to find the right information either about lifestyle or therapeutic decisions. Is this the right diet or exercise regimen for me? Is this the only study I should read about this patient’s case? This could change with cognitive computing.

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is beginning to take off. Continue Reading »

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Marc Altshuller

Marc Altshuller, Vice President, Watson Analytics, IBM

By Marc Altshuller

The rapidly rising flood of data – and the demand from all types of users for quick access to it – is beyond the capacity of traditional processes today. As a result, big-time bottlenecks exist for those who need the information and those who are tasked with providing it.

How serious is the issue? Studies show that people engaged in analytics today actually spend more than 50 percent of their time finding, moving and storing data and only a quarter of the time doing analysis. Staying on top of processes, having the relevant information at hand, and soliciting feedback from others are time consuming tasks.

On top of that, the expectation for organizations to quickly gain insights into their business is higher than ever. A recent IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) report, for example, shows that 74 percent of respondents anticipate the speed at which business executives expect new data-driven insights will continue to accelerate. Continue Reading »

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Anne Altman

Anne Altman, General Manager, U.S. Federal, IBM

By Anne Altman

I’m often asked why I’ve spent the majority of my career at IBM and in particular leading our federal government business. My answer is simple really. Nowhere but IBM can you contribute to innovations that change our world so much, and nowhere but in government can you see technology’s impact on so many lives. Now we’re seeing how one of these great innovations, Watson, is transforming how doctors make decisions about patient care.

Today, IBM announced how the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will use Watson in a two-year pilot to help primary care physicians at the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) accelerate their evidence-based decision making. The clinical focus will include supporting veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Continue Reading »

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Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

Jeff Schick, VP, IBM Social Software

By Jeff Schick

For more than 30 years, email has been stuck in a rut. It’s still basically a list of messages that we plow through all day, every day—in our private and professional lives.  The important stuff is hidden among the trivial and the routine. Sure, you can fiddle with rankings and do rudimentary searches, but, for all the time we spend dealing with our email, it’s one of the least-evolved computer activities around.  Think of it as a tax on your brain.

I probably speak for many people when I say that the first word that comes to mind when I think of email is “frustration.” Actually, the word that comes to mind is less polite than that. That high level of collective frustration is what drove a talented team of software engineers and user experience designers at IBM to reimagine the domain—putting people and relationships at the center of things. Continue Reading »

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Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

Michael Nova, Chief Medical Officer, Pathway Genomics

By Michael Nova M.D.

To describe me as a health nut would be a gross understatement. I run five days a week, bench press 275 pounds, do 120 pushups at a time, and surf the really big waves in Indonesia. I don’t eat red meat, I typically have berries for breakfast and salad for dinner, and I consume an immense amount of kale—even though I don’t like the way it tastes. My daily vitamin/supplement regimen includes Alpha-lipoic acid, Coenzyme Q and Resveratrol. And, yes, I wear one of those fitness gizmos around my neck to count how many steps I take in a day.

I have been following this regimen for years, and it’s an essential part of my life.

For anybody concerned about health, diet and fitness, these are truly amazing times. There’s a superabundance of health and fitness information published online. We’re able to tap into our electronic health records, we can measure just about everything we do physically, and, thanks to the plummeting price of gene sequencing, we can map our complete genomes for as little as $3000 and get readings on smaller chunks of genomic data for less than $100.

Think of it as your own personal health big-data tsunami. Continue Reading »

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November 12th, 2014
9:00
 

SP Cog Coll 2014One of the most intriguing elements of the new era of cognitive computing is the development of brain-inspired technologies. Those are technologies that mimic the functioning of the neurons, axons and synapses in the mammal brain with the goal of interpreting the physical world and processing sensory data: sight, sound, touch and smell. Today’s IBM Research Cognitive Systems Colloquium at IBM Research – Almaden is focusing on this realm of the cognitive computing world. Please come back for frequent reports and updates, and join the conversation at #cognitivecomputing. Continue Reading »

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November 11th, 2014
9:00
 

SP Cognitive Computing ImageBy Jeffrey Welser

One of the most intriguing research projects at the Almaden lab over the past decade has been the development of a neurosynaptic microchip modeled on the workings of the brain. Funded since 2008 by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s SyNAPSE initiative, a team at Almaden led by Dharmendra S. Modha created not only a radically new chip architecture but a new approach to creating software applications.

Tomorrow, their work begins the transition from a science research project to a technology that’s on its way into the commercial marketplace. Continue Reading »

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