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January 21st, 2015
3:00
 

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

ICE chefs, including Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, prepare a Baltic Herring Salad at the Chef Watson cookbook preview dinner in New York.

By Florian Pinel

IBM Watson, the same cognitive computing system that has been put to work in healthcare, insurance, and retail, and which debuted the world’s first cognitive cooking food truck at SXSW last year, will soon be coming to your kitchen counter in the form of a new cookbook put together by IBM and The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

The cookbook is a result of IBM’s two-year collaboration with culinary partner, ICE, to pair the recipe expertise of world-class chefs with the cognitive power of Watson to generate never-before-seen recipes, many of which will be included in the cookbook, available April 14. Continue Reading »

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January 2015 Detorit Michigan North American International Auto Show

The American super car, Falcon F7, at the North American International Auto Show this week in Detroit.

By Benjamin Stanley

If recent vehicle sales are any indication, the automotive industry has seen a resurgence of energy in recent years.

However, selling cars, and cars alone, is not going to sustain this renewed momentum and automakers and their partners will have to weather the transformative forces rising up around them. The good news, is that if you look closely, it will become clear that a new industry identity is emerging—one that is more inclusive and without borders.

It is with this new identity in mind that we decided to investigate what the automotive industry will look like in 10 short years. Continue Reading »

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Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

Ross Mauri, GM, IBM z Systems

By Ross Mauri

Over the holidays, I spent a few days skiing with family and friends in Vermont. Or, it would be more accurate to say my family and friends skied and I spent much of my time on the phone and email planning today’s launch of the IBM z13, a new  generation of IBM z systems built to redefine digital business and enable the new possible.

I was so preoccupied with work that my daughter’s boyfriend, a 21-year-old university student, asked me what was up. Like many of the millennials I meet, he knew next to nothing about the mainframe. And, like other young people I speak to, he was wowed when I explained to him that many of his day-to-day activities depend on mainframe computers operating in the background–including banking, shopping, getting car insurance, traveling, registering for classes, interacting with the DMV and IRS, and, yes, talking on the phone.

This new generation represents a great leap forward for IBM, our clients and society at large. (Thoughts? Tweet to #innovation.)

Continue Reading »

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Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

Stacy Hobson, IBM Research

One of our young inventors grew up in a small town in rural South Carolina; another came from Bangladesh; and a third got hooked on computers at age seven in Haifa, Israel. What these three have in common is their youthful optimism and their dedication to one of IBM’s core values: innovation that matters for our company and the world.

This is no empty slogan: Today, IBM announced that it received a record 7,534 US patents in 2014, marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the list of US patent recipients. Amazingly, on average, we receive more than one new US patent for every hour of every work day.

Hidden behind the raw statistics is an exciting insight: IBM’s young scientists, software programmers and engineers are making important contributions to the company’s innovation achievements. (Thoughts? Tweet to #patent, #invent.)
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December 30th, 2014
16:22
 

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

Dr. Bertalan Meskó, PhD, Medical Futurist, Author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine

By Dr. Bertalan Meskó

Simply having access to the information that patients or medical professionals actually need could be the biggest milestone in the history of medicine.

Even in the modern era, we are struggling to find the right information either about lifestyle or therapeutic decisions. Is this the right diet or exercise regimen for me? Is this the only study I should read about this patient’s case? This could change with cognitive computing.

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is beginning to take off. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Ollmann Saphire laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute, at the Kenema Government Hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Ollmann Saphire laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute, at the Kenema Government Hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

By Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire

The current outbreak of the Ebola virus is the largest in history, and has been described by the World Health Organization as “the most severe acute public health emergency seen in modern times.”

While previous outbreaks have ended when the disease was contained and disappeared from the human population, the scope of the 2014 outbreak raises the possibility that the virus, rather than disappearing again, could become endemic – permanently persisting in human populations in one or more areas. Continue Reading »

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SP Online Shopping Lilly2By Jay Henderson

We all knew it was coming eventually and IBM predicted it would happen this year as it indeed did – more Thanksgiving shoppers turned to their mobile devices than their desktops to browse through all of the Thanksgiving deals.

Specifically, from IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark  we saw 52.1 percent of traffic on Thanksgiving coming from mobile devices, a 22 percent jump from last year. Even more incredibly, if you go back to 2010 only 6.5 percent of traffic came from mobile. That is an eight-fold increase in traffic over only four years.

With regard to sales, mobile devices accounted for 32.3 percent, which percentage-wise was an even greater year-over-year increase at 25.4 percent than the observed increase in mobile traffic. Continue Reading »

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Early General Motors auto designers.

Early General Motors auto designers.

By Paul Papas

Picture an architect laboring over a blueprint, or an auto designer working out the basics of next year’s model. Once upon a time, this mental image probably included a drafting table and a clay model, but not much else.

With some variation, those were creative tools that designers, architects and artists relied on to render their inspirations, refine them into concepts, and finalize them into market-ready products.

Fast forward to the era of high-performance computing and how this has radically transformed the creative process in pharmaceuticals, automotive, and government R&D – where the trials, mistakes and amazing breakthroughs were rendered, tested and proven in silicon, before they were realized in factories. Continue Reading »

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By Wayne Balta

After years of progress, deforestation of the Amazon basin in Brazil has increased for the past two years running. It rose by 29% in the last recorded year, according to a recent report from the Brazilian government.

The Nature Conservancy, which is the largest environmental advocacy group in the world, has adopted a promising approach to addressing deforestation, which it calls “conservation with development.” Continue Reading »

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Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

Jonathan Schaeffer, Dean, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta

By Jonathan Schaeffer

At the just-concluded G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, the leaders of the 20 major economies in the world agreed to “take strong and effective action” on climate change.

Still, at this critical juncture in the history of our planet, it is essential that the scientific world continue to document the dramatic climate changes occurring all across the globe.

One technological area gaining wider use is remote sensing. Today sensors are powerful and inexpensive, network access to remote data is increasing, scientific models are improving, and “big data” algorithms for crunching the numbers are more accessible. Continue Reading »

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