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Innovation
April 11th, 2014
9:00
 

Jesse Dylan, founder and director, wondros

Jesse Dylan, Founder and Director, Wondros

By Jesse Dylan

In my work, I have had the opportunity to tell the stories of some of the most amazing, complex and innovative people and organizations helping to change the world.  By being allowed a window into their work, I can make clear why it matters.

These people and organizations inspire–from the MIT Media Lab to George Soros and the Open Society Foundations to TEDx to the Yes We Can video that captured the hopefulness of the Obama-for-president phenomenon of 2008.

When Steve Simpson, the chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather North America, invited me to work together on a project with IBM to show how technology serves to make lives better, it was an opportunity to learn how one of the most innovative companies in the world thinks about an ever-changing world. The project is Made With IBM.

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SP Masters iPadBy Rick Singer

Ever since Augusta National Golf Club hosted its first Invitational event in 1934, a commitment to history and tradition has permeated the fabric of the Masters Tournament, which begins play this week.

While the Masters has delivered many thrilling, magical moments among the Georgia pines of the Augusta National golf course, many people may not be aware of the Tournament’s unwavering dedication to enriching the game of golf. From playing 18 holes on each of the Tournament’s four days — instead of 36 holes on the third and final day, which was the standard 80 years ago — to introducing the first cumulative over/under scoring method, the Masters has consistently established innovative practices that became and remain standards in the sport. Continue Reading »

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Jon Iwata, IBM Sr. VP, Marketing & Communications

Jon Iwata, Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications, IBM

By Jon Iwata

In November 2008, with the world in the throes of a financial crisis, IBM offered companies and governments a bold invitation: “Let’s build a Smarter Planet.” We saw that the combination of instrumentation, interconnectivity and computer intelligence had created an unprecedented opportunity to make the world work better. We initiated a global conversation about the possibilities.

Today, most people see what we saw. We have engaged with thousands of clients to help them make their enterprises and industries smarter. And our belief in Smarter Planet has only grown stronger. It remains our point of view on the world and the future.

But the world doesn’t stand still, and neither have we. The technologies underpinning Smarter Planet—Big Data analytics (including IBM Watson), mobile, cloud, and new systems of engagement – are converging, and the transformation they are unleashing is accelerating. So IBM is moving beyond the “what” and “why” of Smarter Planet to the “how.”

We call this next phase “Made With IBM.” It is both a harvest of insights and an invitation to take this transformational journey with our company. We mean to show through hard evidence that IBM can be an essential partner in providing the technology and conceptual building blocks for the new world of work. We’re making a case for action.

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By Steve Hamm

IBM Researcher Stuart Parkin

IBM Researcher Stuart Parkin

A few years ago, when IBM Fellow Stuart Parkin first met Claudia Felser, a formidable scientist who is now his fiance, he risked offending her by dismissing some of  her ideas out of hand. “I told her the thing she was working on made no sense at all, but I’ve changed my mind,” he says. “I’m prone to make snap judgments. Sometimes I’m right; sometimes I’m wrong.”

In his own field, solid-state physics, he’s been right more often than not. In fact, he’s being recognized today with the Millennium Technology Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious science honors, by Technology Academy Finland. Previous recipients included Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, and Linus Torvalds, creator of the core elements of Linux, the popular open-source operating system. The Academy cited Stuart’s discoveries in disk drive technology, which have enabled a one-thousand fold increase in the storage capacity of disk drives over the past two decades. Continue Reading »

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Fifty years ago, IBM placed a big bet on the future of computing when it introduced System/360, the first integrated family of computers aimed at both scientific and business uses. In the subsequent years, the mainframe helped to transform industries and society. It was instrumental in the modernization of banking, retail, government, manufacturing and other activities. While only a few people actually touched a mainframe computer, it touches nearly everybody’s life in some way–from your ATM machine to your doctor’s office.

SP mainframe50IBM will officially celebrate the introduction of the mainframe with its Mainframe50 global event starting at 2:00 p.m. US Eastern Time today.  At the event, IBM will look at what new innovations are coming to the mainframe, real-world stories from mainframe users and officially announce the winner of the Global Master the Mainframe competition.

View the livestream video and Tweet to #Mainframe50.

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Scott Megill, CEO, Coriell Life Sciences

Scott Megill, CEO, Coriell Life Sciences

By Scott Megill

The demand for healthcare to go mobile is on the rise.

More and more physicians and patients are using an increasing number of mobile healthcare apps, healthcare apps which enable an almost unlimited range of health-related functions, from an individual patient controlling their diabetes, to monitoring diet & exercise and even, to tracking medical treatments and progress.

By 2017, half of the world’s more than 3.4 billion smart phone users will have downloaded health-related apps.

The rapid increase in mobile health app use is generating an enormous amount of patient data. Simultaneously, a plethora of data is being generated through individual patient’s medical records, which can easily cross multiple departments, physicians, and clinicians.

How can healthcare providers manage this influx of data and tap into the mobile opportunity to draw key insights and improve customer care? Continue Reading »

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Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

Michael Haydock, Vice President, Customer Intelligence, IBM Global Services; IBM Fellow

By Alicia Buksar, IBM Communications

As a teenager parking cars at a Fort Lauderdale country club, IBM customer analytics consulting leader Mike Haydock picked up much more than just tips.

Take the life lesson he received one day from Academy Award winning actor George C. Scott. “He gave me a tremendous insight on how he got into the role of Patton,” Haydock said. “He told me he became that role. He became Patton. That’s how he was able to pull that performance off.”

Haydock says he applies that same philosophy to his own work with clients. “I start to think like them,” he said. “So I know everything about the problem they’re trying to solve and probably more.”

That immersive approach has made Haydock, known as the ‘Math Maestro,’ one of IBM’s most sought after analytics experts, a demand that is likely to grow now that he has been named an IBM Fellow. The Fellow designation acknowledges an employee’s important contributions as well as their industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies. Continue Reading »

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Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

Manny Schecter, Chief Patent Counsel, Intellectual Property Law, IBM

By Manny Schecter

The U.S. has endured numerous economic eras — farming, machines, manufacturing, transportation, and so on.  Why has the U.S. economy survived and, more importantly, thrived throughout these periods?  Were we just inherently gifted farmers?  Were we all mechanically inclined?  Are we experts at efficiency?  If not, what then?

Our economy has proven flexible enough to successfully transition from one era to the next, but how?  The answer lies not in details about the eras themselves, but in the innovation that enabled and sustained them.  That is, the U.S. has been a leading innovator in each economic era.  We are curious.  We are creative.  We are inventive.  And this innovative spirit has been the common thread throughout.

Another reason why our nation has successfully navigated numerous economic eras is we have the most robust patent system in the world.  The patent system is an engine for innovation.  Specifically designed to promote innovation, the patent system provides the protection needed to ensure creative endeavors are not misappropriated by others who have not shouldered the same development expense.  To allow otherwise would advantage copycats over inventors. Continue Reading »

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By Steve Hamm

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Alexandra Mojsilovic, IBM Fellow

Aleksandra “Saska” Mojsilovic grew up in the former Yugoslavia before it splintered into nine nations, and, by the time she graduated with a PhD in  electrical engineering from the University of Belgrade in 1997, “The world I knew didn’t exist anymore,” she says. Today, as a scientist at the IBM Research lab in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., she’s making it possible for people to understand how the world works much more deeply than every before–so they can transcend traditional boundaries and make better decisions in their private and professional lives. Continue Reading »

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Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app: Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app, Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

By Rob White

What do Healthy Splash, Dance Penguin Style, Dino Boy, Burger Party, and Ziggy Bones all have in common?

They’re all mobile applications and they were all developed by a group of 3rd and 10th grade students in Ottawa, Canada, taking part in the TechU.me program this week.

This pioneering program encourages the development of critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication skills in young people. Specifically, it links primary students with high-schoolers and private-sector industry mentors to collaborate on mobile educational games and app development. Continue Reading »

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