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October 7th, 2014
23:00
 

Michael Rhodin, Senior Vice President, IBM Watson Group

Michael Rhodin, Senior Vice President, IBM Watson Group

By Michael Rhodin

It’s hard to believe it’s only been 10 short months since the IBM Watson Group was announced. We talked of bringing together a unique group of people – incredibly talented professionals from across IBM – into a new unit.

This included the single largest movement of IBM Research personnel in our history, along with 10 – 12 startups worth of new cognitive technologies that would help define the Watson team. Individuals and core capabilities from our software business would join into the fray.

A new approach to engaging the market would be created from talent across IBM’s sales, marketing, services and consulting organizations. A new cloud delivery organization would be formed out of our services teams to serve this market – all brought together with a single purpose: to usher in a new era of computing. Continue Reading »

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Michael Barborak, Manager, Unstructured Language Engineering, IBM Research

Michael Barborak, Manager, Unstructured Language Engineering, IBM Research

By Michael Barborak

When IBM’s Watson defeated two grand-champions on the TV quiz show, Jeopardy!, the world’s smartest computer was matched up against two really smart humans. The quiz-show win captured peoples’ attention, but, these days, as we identify uses for Watson throughout society, it’s becoming clear that these technologies will be used primarily to augment human intelligence, not compete with people or replace us.

It’s not human versus machine, but human plus machine taking on challenges together and achieving more than either could do on its own. Nowhere is this powerful new one-two punch clearer than in the world of medicine and healthcare. Cognitive machines have the potential to help physicians diagnose diseases and assess the best treatments for individual patients. But, to make the most of this opportunity, machines will have to be designed and trained to interact with doctors in ways that are most natural to them. Continue Reading »

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Kim Stephens, Co-author, Your Journey to Executive: Insights from IBM Women Executives; Diversity and Inclusion, IBM

Kim Stephens, Co-author, Your Journey to Executive: Insights from IBM Women Executives; Diversity and Inclusion, IBM

By Kim Stephens

It is no longer enough to recognize the value of women in the workplace, or even to encourage growth. To meet business objectives in the future, organizations of all sizes need to create an environment where women can thrive and build careers, where they have opportunities to stretch their skills and take on visible roles, and where they are encouraged to integrate work and life in a way that works for them.

We need to reach out to women early or mid-career to learn more about potential inhibitors and career development needs and desires. This is how we ensure we build a diverse leadership pipeline for the future. Continue Reading »

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Terry F. Yosie, President and CEO of the World Environment Center

Terry F. Yosie, President and CEO of the World Environment Center

By Terry F. Yosie

Environmental issues are big, thorny problems. Scarcities in water, food and raw materials are too complex for any single company or non-governmental organization to solve on its own.  In order to make a difference, it’s necessary to collaborate with like-minded partners to achieve shared goals.

Collaboration is a normal feature of customer-supplier relationships, government-business partnerships and initiatives with universities and other partners. It’s also typical for organizations looking for new business models that can sustain profitability while addressing societal needs, natural resource management, product and service innovation, and differentiation of brand value, to name a few.  Collaboration can spur organizations to redefine their business purpose by utilizing society as another kind of R&D lab for innovation.  Continue Reading »

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October 4th, 2012
8:57
 

Charles Vincent, Chief Architect, IBM Global Center of Competency for Energy and Utilities

By Fabienne Guildhary, IBM Communications, Energy & Utilities/Media & Entertainment

Often, history serves as a tool to teach us valuable lessons and help us avoid repeating the same mistakes. As Chief Architect of the IBM Global Center of Competency for Energy and Utilities, Charles Vincent is leveraging his considerable knowledge of Electric Vehicles (EVs) to better shape the future of transportation.

Charles’ passion for EVs was sparked long before his career in electronic transportation took off. Fascinated by the technology at an early age, Charles devoted a lot of time poring over vintage publications on the subject, such as American Electric Vehicle Association newsletters from the early 1900’s. Then in the 1980’s, Charles got the opportunity to put his knowledge and passion to work.  

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This is part two of a series about Smarter Public Safety.  Read part one here.

By Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier

Just over 20 years ago, Washington, D.C., was known as the “Murder Capital” of the United States. I was a fairly new officer when we were given this title and believe me, it was not something I was proud of and I committed myself to ensuring I did what I could to change that. Fast forward to a year ago and I can’t tell you how proud I was to announce that our homicide rate has dropped to a 50-year low.

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Four years ago, IBM set out a vision for building a Smarter Planet. Behind this promise was the idea that the world could become a more interconnected, smarter and better place to live. IBM Fellow and Global Business Services CTO Kerrie Holley  is an example of one person who has made a difference in making the planet smarter.

Kerrie grew up in the South Side of Chicago—an area known for its crime and poverty. He never knew his father, knew very little of his mother and was raised by his maternal grandmother. Fifty years ago, one might have predicted a young Kerrie to fall victim to drugs, gangs and other negative influences in his environment. Instead, he excelled as a student at the Sue Duncan Children’s Center, where he would later tutor U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Academy Award nominee Michael Clarke Duncan. There, Kerrie developed a passion for science and math, which he would later use to earn a Bachelor’s of Science in mathematics and Juris Doctorate from DePaul University.

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May 22nd, 2012
9:00
 

Guest Post by: Bridget Van Kralingen, Senior Vice President, IBM Global Business Services

Every two years since 2004, IBM’s consultants have met with CEO and public sector leaders worldwide to understand their perspectives on issues ranging from globalization to talent. And every time, CEOs consistently identified market forces as the biggest driver of change.

That changed this year. Continue Reading »

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by Martin Kelly, Partner, IBM Venture Capital Group

We’re pleased to announce the line-up for IBM SmartCamp 2012. This is our program for helping entrepreneurs who are developing products and services that make the world work better. Entrepreneurs who participate gain access to mentors who understand their industry and can help them develop their businesses. Also, networking and publicity can lead to venture funding.

We plan more than 17 SmartCamp events worldwide this year. The schedule starts in Miami on May 15th, with a new format focused on healthcare. Over the last two years we have seen growing interest in certain topics and believe the timing is right to have dedicated events. These one- and two-day events will bring together entrepreneurs, mentors and investors in particular industries allowing a more focused discussion.  We will follow Miami up with New York on May 24th with a focus on Smart Cities. The New York event was planned to coincide with TechCrunch Disrupt NYC,  to allow mentors and companies to make the most of the community.

For more information and to apply, you can get started here.

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