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February 14th, 2014
0:01
 

Kimberly A. Whitler, Contributor for the Forbes CMO Network and Professor at Indiana University

Kimberly A. Whitler, Contributor for the Forbes CMO Network and Professor at Indiana University

By Kimberly A. Whitler

The recipe for good marketing is a mixture of both art and science – combining the creative elements of branding with the technological impact and insights of digital analytics. As companies across a wide range of industries move from manufacturing to selling directly to consumers via stores, mobile, and e-commerce channels, the formula for success revolves around engaging consumers and understanding the individual preferences of shoppers.SP chocolate

The latest company to transform its business model is Swiss-based chocolatier Lindt & Sprüngli. Lindt, founded in 1845, has become one of the world’s most consumed confections through innovative candy-making techniques and superior chocolate recipes.  Fast forward to today and Lindt is hitting its sweet spot transforming its business
model
– from simply manufacturing chocolate to selling directly to consumers.  Continue Reading »

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Chris Preimesberger, Features & Analysis Editor, eWEEK

Chris Preimesberger, Features & Analysis Editor, eWEEK

By Chris Preimesberger

Hot on the heels of the bring your own device (BYOD) trend is this one: bring your own cloud (BYOC).

It sounds like another market-speak acronym designed to promote a new product or service. But once you get past the jargon, there is some substance there, not to mention a whole new market. In fact, users are increasingly presented with the option to own their own personal storage or collaboration cloud outside of their enterprise.

BYOC describes a trend in which people bring their own “personal clouds” to work; or when employees are empowered to use public or private third-party cloud services to help them perform certain jobs. In the corporate version, BYOC typically involves the stitching together of enterprise and consumer software, both in the cloud and on-premise, to get the job done. Continue Reading »

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Al Speranza, Vice President, Channel, SAP Americas

Al Speranza, Vice President, Channel, SAP Americas

By Al Speranza

For some time, government agencies have been attempting to move away from heavy capital expenditure, shifting IT expenses to a new operating model that enables the addition of new capabilities, more easily and in far less time, than traditional application architectures would have needed. The management benefits are obvious and have played a big part in the push for consuming technology solutions via the cloud.

For years, public sector CIOs have faced unrelenting pressures to do more with less, but at the same time they’ve been unable to afford big-bang, transformational change in order to meet these demands. This challenge is especially acute in smaller agencies and in local government. Continue Reading »

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Sanjay Rishi, Managing Partner, IBM Cloud Consulting Services

Sanjay Rishi, Managing Partner, IBM Cloud Consulting Services

By Sanjay Rishi

Cloud is enabling more than just opportunities to improve IT operations. It’s enabling organizations to transform entire business strategies.

According to a recent IBM survey, over the next three years cloud computing’s strategic importance to top decision makers across virtually every area of business is expected to more than double from 34 percent to 72 percent – leapfrogging competing IT concerns by 58 percent.

In this new reality, the cloud is the ultimate source of connectivity, helping smarter enterprises rise above the competition. In many ways, cloud is the new dial tone, becoming as seamless and reliable to business as the dial tone of the telephone. Continue Reading »

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Matthews Thomas, Master Inventor, IBM

Matthews Thomas, Master Inventor, IBM

By Mathews Thomas

Are you facing challenges creating business process that require services from multiple cloud vendors with your enterprise? Wouldn’t it be nice to seamlessly integrate these services with large volumes of data you have to obtain key business insights?

Right now, cloud applications and services are single instances from one provider or vendor. IBM inventors have created a new technique that would make it possible to bring cloud applications and services into a single view to make it easier for business users to access these services and integrate them with in-house systems – for a single view of business operations.

IBM’s patent # 8,504,400 Dynamically Optimized Distributed Cloud Computing-based Business Process Management (BPM) System, helps combine the benefits of cloud services with in-house systems. Continue Reading »

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Jonathan Batty, IBM Communications

Jonathan Batty,  Communications, IBM

By Jonathan Batty

Urbanization is a global trend but one with unique urgency in Africa with some cities expected to grow by as much as 85 percent in the next 15 years. As the pressure on city systems increases, IBM’s new Africa research lab is researching solutions which address interconnected urban issues such as public safety and human mobility.

Chief Scientist, IBM Research - Africa, Dr. Uyi Stewart (left) presents a smarter cities demo to H.E. the President of Kenya (center).

Chief Scientist, IBM Research – Africa, Dr. Uyi Stewart (left) presents a smarter cities demo to H.E. the President of Kenya (center).

According to government estimates, traffic costs Nairobi US $600 000 a day. In an effort to tackle this growing problem, IBM has partnered with Kenyan internet service provider AccessKenya, to develop a pilot solution to enable Nairobi commuters to use their mobile phones to get advice on driving routes through the city depending on estimates of traffic congestion. Continue Reading »

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Nataraj Nagaratnam, Distinguished Engineer, CTO, IBM Security Solutions

Nataraj Nagaratnam, Distinguished Engineer, CTO, IBM Security Solutions

By Nataraj Nagaratnam

With IDC predicting that by 2017, the U.S. Federal Government will quadruple from $2 billion next year to nearly $9 billion in what it spends on cloud computing (mostly on private cloud), the topic of cloud security is going to quickly become the center of attention in Washington D.C.

Though the government has established some early security certifications like the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA) and the Federal Risk and Authorization management Program (FedRAMP) to give agencies guidance on security, there will be a heightened need to go even further as agencies move mission critical workloads to the cloud. Continue Reading »

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David Garrison, M.L.S., Program Director, Information Systems Program and Information Technology Management Program, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

David Garrison, M.L.S., Program Director, Information Systems Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

By David Garrison

For most people, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, is a relatively small university in the midwest.

However, this institution has a scope and reach that leverages industry on a global scale. As such, we are committed to training young professionals with the most relevant skills possible that will help them secure high-value jobs upon graduation. These days, that starts with training them in the latest skills in cloud computing.

But it wasn’t always this way.

Until recently, if someone mentioned “the cloud” to my students, they might have looked to the sky. Today, many now understand that cloud computing architectures are the foundation for big business around the world. But it’s more personal than that. Continue Reading »

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Yu Deng, Master Inventor, IBM Research

Yu Deng, Master Inventor, IBM Research

By Richard Silberman, Writer/Researcher, IBM Communications

For the past four years, Yu Deng has had her head in the cloud – working on nearly 20 cloud computing inventions for which she has filed or received patents. An IBM Master Inventor and researcher in services analytics and knowledge management, Deng is lead or co-inventor on innovations that will make cloud computing easier, more accessible and more affordable.

Deng’s work at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., is helping define a new type of cloud service delivery model and propel cloud computing into the future. One of Deng’s key ideas, which is up for patent, would help make catalog management flexible and extensible over the cloud. Continue Reading »

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October 14th, 2013
8:00
 

Mike Grandinetti, Managing Director, Soutboro Capital

Mike Grandinetti, Managing Director, Southboro Capital

By Mike Grandinetti

From start-ups in Silicon Valley and New York City, to entrepreneurs in India and Africa, the world is witnessing an unprecedented rate of innovation.

For many of these young companies cloud is the technology and strategy behind their inventiveness and the keystone to enabling them to take advantage of the insights, collaboration and scale of things like Big Data, social and mobile.

But they’re not deploying any old cloud. For the majority of companies we work with, cloud solutions based on open standards are the leading development platforms. The reason: open standards enable them to scale in the future and avoid the high costs and technical limitations of vendor lock-in. Continue Reading »

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