Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
Smarter Education

By Wim Steelant and Lu Wang

A lot goes into getting students excited about science and technology. One key way to do this is to get students involved in hands-on projects and be a part of environments where technology is at the center, so that they can see it at work and use it to solve problems, other than updating one’s social network status from a smartphone.

 At St. Thomas University in Miami we are focusing on bolstering our School of Science, Technology and Engineering Management capabilities. Our strategy rests on the promise to offer students innovative classroom curricula and collaborative research opportunities utilizing a cloud infrastructure aimed at getting them excited about the capabilities and potential of cloud computing within and outside university walls.

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Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app: Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

Notre Dame High School 10th Graders, Filsan Nur and Erica Tan, in front of their mobile app, Burger Party, in Ottawa, March 27, 2014.

By Rob White

What do Healthy Splash, Dance Penguin Style, Dino Boy, Burger Party, and Ziggy Bones all have in common?

They’re all mobile applications and they were all developed by a group of 3rd and 10th grade students in Ottawa, Canada, taking part in the TechU.me program this week.

This pioneering program encourages the development of critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication skills in young people. Specifically, it links primary students with high-schoolers and private-sector industry mentors to collaborate on mobile educational games and app development. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Christelle Scharff, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Pace University

Dr. Christelle Scharff, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Pace University

By Dr. Christelle Scharff

Mobile technology is closing the achievement gap and providing students and adults around the world with unprecedented access to education.

Mobile learning offers new ways to support learning through tablets, MP3 players and phones. It accommodates different styles of learning – anywhere, anytime and, particularly, on the go. Cloud technologies are at the root of mobile education’s rapid expansion, opening up new learning possibilities for people across the globe who previously had no access to any kind of education at all. Cloud technologies are used in solutions going from SMS services adapted to basic phones to sophisticated mobile apps for smart phones. Continue Reading »

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Evan Nisonson, Evan Nisonson, CEO, ConnectEDU

Evan Nisonson, CEO, ConnectEDU

By Evan Nisonson

A staggering one-in-three high school graduates who took the ACT tests in 2013 are not ready for college, the testing organization has said in a recent report. Of the 1.8 million high school graduates who took the test last year, only 26 percent achieved college readiness benchmarks in all four subjects of English, reading, math and science. Another 27 percent met two or three benchmarks, and 16 percent met just one.

This is a significant challenge to the expectations of policy makers, educators, parents and students themselves who look to our educational systems to better prepare the youth of today into the skilled workforce of the future. To be clear, the number of unprepared, or even under-prepared, college freshman can impact states even today through a rise in unemployment and a decrease in the number of much-needed skilled workers. We must do better.

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image6548420One part of a solution is to arm our teachers with better tools, such as digital content, that would lead to a more personalized and more impactful curricula for students. The other is harnessing the multitude of data generated in education to establish linkages between K-12, postsecondary, and workforce partners.

The latter part of the solution is what the Montana Office of Public Instruction (OPI) has chosen to deploy to better prepare their students for college and careers. The aim of the project is to facilitate collaboration between educators, parents, and students to develop academic, financial, and future career plans that align with student aspirations. Continue Reading »

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Adalio Sanchez, General Manager, IBM x86 and PureSystems Solutions, IBM

Adalio Sanchez, General Manager, IBM x86 and PureSystems Solutions, IBM

By Adalio Sanchez

Forward-thinking academic institutions rely on advanced technology systems to support internal research programs and to improve their own IT operations. Just as importantly, the practical application of these technologies in the academic world plays a critical role in promoting the development and education of students in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Throughout my career as a technologist, I’ve witnessed firsthand how the right technology solutions have the power to foster and advance STEM education and make our education systems smarter – from turning ideas into useful knowledge and practical business technologies that can benefit our economy and society, to filling the employment pipeline with workers equipped with the skills necessary to make them competitive and successful. Continue Reading »

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Jon Mogford, Vice Chancellor for Research, Texas A&M University System

Jon Mogford, Vice Chancellor of Research, Texas A&M University System

The Texas A&M University System and IBM have created one of the world’s largest computational sciences infrastructure. Built on a mix of high performance computing technologies that include Blue Gene/Q, Power 7 and System x servers, scientists and engineers across the system’s 11 universities and seven state agencies will work on projects dedicated to advancing agriculture, geosciences and engineering. Early tests pitted the Blue Gene/Q, installed at TAMUS’s flagship campus in College Station, on a material sciences problem that previously took weeks. The Blue Gene/Q’s 418 Teraflops solved it in less than an hour.

Jon Mogford, the Vice Chancellor of Research for TAMUS, will play a key role in the coordination and success of these diverse projects, teams and technologies. He met with IBM Smarter Planet to discuss how the university system is putting this massive new infrastructure to work. Continue Reading »

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Michael King, Vice President, Global Education Industry, IBM

Michael King, Vice President, Global Education Industry, IBM

By Michael King and Chalapathy Neti

The successful education of the nation’s young people is critical to the future of our society and economy. With growing classrooms, fewer resources and stretched school budgets it has become even more challenging for educators to spend time with those students that need help the most. How do you make sure that no student gets left behind in a challenging educational environment where every student learns differently?

Chalapathy Neti, Director of Education Transformation, IBM Research

Chalapathy Neti, Director of Education Transformation, IBM Research

Today’s classroom is designed to maximize the teacher’s lecture effectiveness by using an approach where there is a “push” of content. The future of classroom education will rely on delivering content on a personal level, so that the class time can be spent more on discussions, solving problems, and student interaction. We are already seeing an increase in digital data and the use of devices such as tablets in the classroom to improve access, and smarter content delivery for a more engaging learning environment. Continue Reading »

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November 12th, 2013
9:00
 

James Spohrer, Director, IBM Global University Programs

Dr. James Spohrer, Director, IBM Global University Programs

By Dr. James Spohrer

It’s no longer a question of if or when. The age of Big Data is here.

Look no further than the fact that a full 90 percent of all the data in the world has been generated over the last two years and some 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created each day.

And while the pace of data isn’t about to slow down — in the healthcare industry alone the average data per hospital will increase from 167 TB today to 665 TB in 2015 — the good news is that the data deluge is rife with opportunity. Just ask the public agency seeking to alleviate gridlock traffic by studying a stream of data from electronic sensors; or, the medical facility searching for new ways to cure diseases by combing through clinical trial results. Big Data is the new “natural resource” and both public and private entities can play essential roles in transforming that opportunity into reality. Continue Reading »

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November 11th, 2013
15:39
 

Tricia Kennedy, Executive Director, eCLASS Transformation  Gwinnett County Public Schools

Tricia Kennedy, Executive Director, eCLASS Transformation
Gwinnett County Public Schools

By Tricia Kennedy

Gwinnett County Public Schools, Georgia’s largest school district and the 13th largest in the nation, expanded the walls of the classroom this fall with new technology resources that foster collaboration and nurture creativity and innovation.

The resources are a part of the district’s eCLASS (digital Content, Learning, and Support System) initiative, an integrated enterprise solution to enhance student engagement and the learning process which includes the Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) Tool.

Serving nearly 169,000 students, the district faced some harsh realities several years ago: Continue Reading »

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October 25th, 2013
9:31
 

President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama addressed the students and faculty of the Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Brooklyn, New York, today to spotlight the school, its teachers and administrators, the architects of the program, and its partners.

Opened in September 2011, P-TECH is a collaboration among the New York City Public Schools, The City University of New York and IBM. An open-admissions, grades 9 – 14 institution, P-TECH provides a rigorous academic and workplace skills curriculum leading to a no-cost associate degree in technology and preferential consideration for jobs at IBM. The P-TECH model has been so successful that five similar schools have opened in Chicago; four more are planned for New York City; and New York State will rollout 16 new P-TECH-model schools in 2014. Continue Reading »

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