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Cynthia Burghard, a Research Director with IDC’s Health Insights

Cynthia Burghard, a Research Director with IDC’s Health Insights

The world of healthcare is revolving and evolving ever faster as new technologies and approaches to care take shape. Watching the transformation from the front row is Cynthia Burghard, a Research Director with IDC’s Health Insights. The Smarter Planet sat down with Burghard this week at the IBM Health and Social Programs Summit to learn more about holistic care as well as the rising role of such technologies as cloud, analytics and mobile.

Smarter Planet: Why are we finally beginning to take a holistic view of each individual in the context of their environment?
Cynthia Burghard: Many studies have identified a wide range of factors that are not clinical as determinants of health. It used to be thought that lifestyle and genetics were the key determinants of health but it has been shown that factors such as socio economics, behavioral, spiritual and environmental factors all contribute to health and disease.

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Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

By Ronan Rooney

There has been a lot of discussion about the cost of health care and many suggestions about how we can improve population health.

Traditional models of care focus on individual episodes and they work really well for people with simple clinical, behavioral or social challenges. Where they fall down is when they’re applied to people who have multiple or complex challenges – the people we consider the most vulnerable.

As part of IBM’s Curam Research Team, we’re very focused on finding new ways to help those vulnerable citizens who are responsible for a disproportionate amount of healthcare expenditure – the top 5% of spenders drive 45%-50% of total medical spending. Continue Reading »

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Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

By Bernard Tyson

Since shortly after Kaiser Permanente’s launch in 1945, this organization has been at the forefront of using technology to improve patient care. We started collecting large amounts of data about patients and treatment outcomes long before electronic medical records and “big data” became hot topics. And, today, we remain one of the early adopters of cutting-edge technology in the healthcare industry.

Like other healthcare organizations, we take advantage of technology to make our operations more efficient and to help deliver superior care. But I believe that information technology can play an even more important role in this industry: It can help us transform from focusing on healthcare to focusing on health.

What do I mean by that? To me, the term healthcare connotes being reactive to problems. That’s not enough. An organization that focuses more broadly on health itself can help people extend their lives and live healthier lives. Continue Reading »

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Lynda Chin, Scientific Dir., MD Anderson Institute for Applied Cancer Science

Lynda Chin,  Chair of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

By Lynda Chin

New technologies have their upsides and downsides.

High speed computing has allowed for rapid gene sequencing and a tremendous acceleration in scientific discovery.  The parallel developments of handheld computers and high-speed wireless networks have led to an amazing point in human history; one where several libraries worth of information can immediately be accessed from devices we carry in our pockets. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, an IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

Dr. Guillermo Cecchi, an IBM Reseach staff member working in Biometaphorical Computing

By Dr. Guillermo Cecchi

More than 63 million psychiatric interviews are conducted every year. But none of them are analyzed in a quantitative codified manner. Surprising? Not really. Doctors don’t have time to find patterns in the pages of notes they keep per patient. Those pages, though, keep “big data” on psychiatric issues that analytics can help unlock and predict before episodes occur.

Now, after a multi-year study and accompanying development of text analysis algorithms, we may finally be able to quantify patterns in these interviews, and help doctors treat patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other conditions. Continue Reading »

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Scott Megill, CEO, Coriell Life Sciences

Scott Megill, CEO, Coriell Life Sciences

By Scott Megill

The demand for healthcare to go mobile is on the rise.

More and more physicians and patients are using an increasing number of mobile healthcare apps, healthcare apps which enable an almost unlimited range of health-related functions, from an individual patient controlling their diabetes, to monitoring diet & exercise and even, to tracking medical treatments and progress.

By 2017, half of the world’s more than 3.4 billion smart phone users will have downloaded health-related apps.

The rapid increase in mobile health app use is generating an enormous amount of patient data. Simultaneously, a plethora of data is being generated through individual patient’s medical records, which can easily cross multiple departments, physicians, and clinicians.

How can healthcare providers manage this influx of data and tap into the mobile opportunity to draw key insights and improve customer care? Continue Reading »

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February 27th, 2014
17:00
 

Martin Cooper, inventor of the original mobile phone

Martin Cooper, Chairman and co-founder of incubator, Dyna LLC; inventor of the original mobile phone

By Martin Cooper

After decades of existence, the mobile phone is finally beginning to hint at its potential to address some of society’s most important challenges.

As the mobile industry grows out of its vapid obsession with pixels, apps, and bling, recognition of one of the mobile phone’s higher callings is getting attention. This emerging focus on the phone as a device for transferring personalized health information to and from an individual sets society up for revolutionary improvements in healthcare.

Just imagine a society in which diseases, and the pain and suffering they cause, simply do not exist—in which people are healthy until end-of-life. Such a society is within the realm of scientific possibilities, but only if we change our approaches to healthcare. Smarter use of data, enabled by mobile phones, can help as we switch from curing diseases that have already struck to anticipating and preventing the diseases before they strike. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Michael Weiner, DO, Director, Healthcare Strategic Solutions, IBM

Dr. Michael Weiner, DO, Director, Healthcare Strategic Solutions, IBM

By Dr. Michael Weiner

It’s been 53 years since IBM created the first electronic health record (EHR) for Akron Children’s Hospital, built on IBM’s Ramac 305. In those days, we could never have dreamed of the advances that would soon unfold for the modern EHR. From the amount of data they collect and store to the ability to access them remotely on mobile devices, EHRs have truly transformed medicine over the past few decades.

EHRs have also begun to transform our healthcare ecosystem. As a physician, I can attest to the value of an EHR to help improve the quality of care we deliver to our patients.

Akron Children’s Hospital, IBM RAMAK 305, 1961.

Akron Children’s Hospital, IBM RAMAK 305, 1961.

EHR’s can also facilitate care coordination between clinicians and help achieve greater administrative efficiencies.But as we look to the future of EHRs and to the requirements of Stage 3 meaningful use in the U.S., we continue to ask ourselves how to integrate structured and unstructured clinical data. Many of us have often wondered: When will the technology be able to read our notes? Continue Reading »

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Michael Karasick, Director, IBM Research - Almaden

Michael Karasick, Director, IBM Research – Almaden

By Michael Karasick

When Thomas J. Watson Sr. joined  IBM in 1914 as its president, the firm didn’t have a single engineer on its payroll, so he quickly hired engineers and set up a product development group in a brownstone near New York’s Penn Station. He created a patent development department in 1932 and, in 1945, he established the first corporate scientific research laboratory. Today, IBM Research has grown to become the largest corporate research organization in the world, with 3000 professionals at 12 labs in 10 countries.

The point is that the nature of innovation keeps evolving and organizations have to change with it.

That’s why IBM is adopting a new approach to innovation for our newly formed IBM Watson Group, which will be headquartered in New York’s Silicon Alley.  In the group, we are melding research, product development, experience design and collaboration with business partners and clients—all with the goal of accelerating the development of cognitive computing solutions for many of the world’s most vexing problems. This new era of computing requires a new approach to innovation.

Our Watson initiative builds on top of IBM’s long tradition of innovation, which placed IBM as the No. 1 recipient of US patents in 2013 for the 21st year in a row. We received 6,809 patents, easily outdistancing Samsung, the No. 2 finisher, with 4,676. The next US company on the top 10 list, Microsoft, ranked No. 5.

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Jay Katzen, President, Clinical Solutions, Elsevier

Jay Katzen, President, Clinical Solutions, Elsevier

By Jay Katzen

For our customers in the medical field, great research can enable great outcomes – from avoiding errors to ensuring patients feel comfortable and informed. 

 I know first hand how frustrating and anxiety-provoking a hospital visit can be. Not too long ago, I rushed to a hospital emergency room to seek treatment and was disturbed when my medical history wasn’t captured, tests weren’t explained, and no one helped me understand my diagnosis and treatment.

 Fortunately, the consequences weren’t grave. Still, I see my experience as a symptom of a healthcare system where it’s difficult for doctors to easily research the clinical information needed to make decisions, given the time constraints they face. Continue Reading »

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