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Jon Iwata, IBM Sr. VP, Marketing & Communications

Jon Iwata, Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications, IBM

By Jon Iwata

In November 2008, with the world in the throes of a financial crisis, IBM offered companies and governments a bold invitation: “Let’s build a Smarter Planet.” We saw that the combination of instrumentation, interconnectivity and computer intelligence had created an unprecedented opportunity to make the world work better. We initiated a global conversation about the possibilities.

Today, most people see what we saw. We have engaged with thousands of clients to help them make their enterprises and industries smarter. And our belief in Smarter Planet has only grown stronger. It remains our point of view on the world and the future.

But the world doesn’t stand still, and neither have we. The technologies underpinning Smarter Planet—Big Data analytics (including IBM Watson), mobile, cloud, and new systems of engagement – are converging, and the transformation they are unleashing is accelerating. So IBM is moving beyond the “what” and “why” of Smarter Planet to the “how.”

We call this next phase “Made With IBM.” It is both a harvest of insights and an invitation to take this transformational journey with our company. We mean to show through hard evidence that IBM can be an essential partner in providing the technology and conceptual building blocks for the new world of work. We’re making a case for action.

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John Armstrong, Partner, IBM Interactive Experience

John Armstrong, Partner, IBM Interactive Experience

By John Armstrong

The current tech narrative is rife with examples of how data analytics has reshaped our world and the industries that play in it. Healthcare providers are able to analyze vast pools of data to improve patient care through greater understanding of an individual’s medical history or determine which treatment is likely to be most effective, for example. Retailers can keep tabs on their customer’s purchases to make product recommendations that are most inclined to catch their interest.

Buoyed by these successes, the industry is pushing data into new, unexpected corners. Recently, we’ve seen individual companies begin to experiment with how data can inform design, from a company’s products to the experiences they offer. It’s about taking something that was once largely art and enriching it through science.

For example, Nike experimented with what it calls “smart data,” using the right data and scenario planning to come up with more sustainable designs for its products, such as a dyeing technique that doesn’t need water. Continue Reading »

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March 27th, 2014
11:30
 

Ron Ambrosio, Distinguished Engineer & CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

Ron Ambrosio, Distinguished Engineer & CTO, Smarter Energy Research, IBM

By Ron Ambrosio

Machines have been connecting to the Internet for many years. To the point that, in today’s Internet of Things, more “Things” are connected to the Internet than people. This evolution now has industrial equipment branching out of their closed control networks to connect to enterprise networks, and in some cases to the Internet, too. But it’s created a challenge in how that data is understood and used. So, we joined AT&T, Cisco, GE, and Intel to establish the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) to help influence the global standards development process for how industrial equipment – like transformers in the grid – connect and communicate.

In the same way you connect to the Internet, whether over wifi or a mobile network, no matter where you go or what device you use, proprietary industrial equipment needs a standard way to communicate, too. Continue Reading »

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Sander Dolder, Senior Project Manger, New York City Economic Development Corp.

Sander Dolder, Senior Project Manger, New York City Economic Development Corp.

By Sander Dolder and Devin McIntire

During a recent World Environment Center roundtable in New York City, it became clear that modern challenges including urbanization, climate change and economic woes are forcing the public and private sectors to revamp their thinking about infrastructure.

Devin McIntire, Sustainability Consultant specializing in Organizational Innovation

Devin McIntire, Sustainability Consultant specializing in Organizational Innovation

Opportunities abound for successful and sustainable infrastructure projects. For example, designing an enduring vision, establishing an effective communication plan, and embracing data that will measure real value, are all things that can influence behavior and drive better decision making. But to do it right, businesses of all sizes must consider three key issues: resiliency, behavior and Big Data.

Resiliency is the ability for a system to recover, adapt, and grow in the face of unforeseen changes. Companies can use the concept of resilience to help grow or transform their business, including things like where to locate, where to source materials, or what energy systems to invest in that would optimize their adaptability to climate change. Continue Reading »

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Ocea Garriock, Technical Professionals Leader,  IBM South Africa

Ocea Garriock, Technical Professionals Leader, IBM South Africa

By Ocea Garriock

Banks have become particularly good at analyzing the data for trends, patterns and insights to help boost efficiency, ensure compliance and increase revenue.

But not all of this data lives conveniently in a structured database or data warehouse. Sometimes it comes from real-time data feeds and social media. These growing sources of structured and unstructured data are potential treasure chests. But big data without analysis is just a lot of data.

Most South African / African companies are still just experimenting with big data technologies, looking to understand how big data should slot into their world views. The same is true of organisations in the rest of the world. Continue Reading »

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Michael Karasick, Director, IBM Research - Almaden

Michael Karasick, Director, IBM Research – Almaden

By Michael Karasick

When Thomas J. Watson Sr. joined  IBM in 1914 as its president, the firm didn’t have a single engineer on its payroll, so he quickly hired engineers and set up a product development group in a brownstone near New York’s Penn Station. He created a patent development department in 1932 and, in 1945, he established the first corporate scientific research laboratory. Today, IBM Research has grown to become the largest corporate research organization in the world, with 3000 professionals at 12 labs in 10 countries.

The point is that the nature of innovation keeps evolving and organizations have to change with it.

That’s why IBM is adopting a new approach to innovation for our newly formed IBM Watson Group, which will be headquartered in New York’s Silicon Alley.  In the group, we are melding research, product development, experience design and collaboration with business partners and clients—all with the goal of accelerating the development of cognitive computing solutions for many of the world’s most vexing problems. This new era of computing requires a new approach to innovation.

Our Watson initiative builds on top of IBM’s long tradition of innovation, which placed IBM as the No. 1 recipient of US patents in 2013 for the 21st year in a row. We received 6,809 patents, easily outdistancing Samsung, the No. 2 finisher, with 4,676. The next US company on the top 10 list, Microsoft, ranked No. 5.

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Menka Uttamchandani, vice president of business intelligence, Denihan Hospitality Group

Menka Uttamchandani, vice president of business intelligence, Denihan Hospitality Group

By Menka Uttamchandani

In any given city, travelers are faced with dozens of hotel options, making the market not only competitive, but crowded. How does a hotel understand what potential customers are looking for and then provide it?

At Denihan Hospitality Group, a key to our success is our ability to strategically manage business information to make smarter decisions, allowing us to better understand guests on both an individual and company or agent level. This has enabled us to market and book the right room at the right time at the right rate, increasing revenue and profitability. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Timothy G. Buchman, MD, PhD, Founding Director, Emory Center for Critical Care, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University

Dr. Timothy G. Buchman, MD, PhD, Founding Director, Emory Center for Critical Care, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University

By Dr. Timothy G. Buchman, MD, PhD

Remember when airplane cockpits were filled with round gauges, each providing a piece of basic information to the pilot?

In most hospitals today, we essentially operate on that same old-fashioned model for critically ill patients – those in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Machines provide separate pieces of data about a patient, say, heart rate, blood pressure or organ function. It’s then up to the doctor to watch all of this data and make decisions.

Take for example my patient, lying in the ICU with tubes of various sizes snaking into her body. Her husband and children look on while she is tended by an experienced critical care nurse. Eight infusers drip powerful drugs into her veins. A microprocessor-controlled ventilator regulates the composition, volume and pressure of each breath she takes. Continue Reading »

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Fred Balboni, Business Analytics and Optimization Leader, IBM Global Business Services

Fred Balboni, Business Analytics and Optimization Leader, IBM Global Business Services

By Fred Balboni

Today’s marketplace is competitive. Successful leaders are infusing analytics throughout their enterprise to drive smarter decisions, enable faster actions and optimize outcomes. Business and technology executives alike are racing to convert data-driven insights into meaningful results.

IBM has proven experience and expertise turning data into value. But we wanted to know: are all investments created equal? Is there a secret sauce that enables one organization to derive more value from their data than another organization?

To help us answer these fundamental questions, we engaged the IBM Institute for Business Value to survey nearly 1,000 business and IT executives from around the globe. The survey was designed to identify and differentiate specific activities that can help organizations derive more value from their data. Continue Reading »

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Wes Hunt, Vice President, Customer Analytics at Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

Wes Hunt, Vice President, Customer Analytics at Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

By Wes Hunt

At my company, we have been using Big Data and analytics, as permitted by law, to transform the way we serve our customers – to provide deeply personalized services. We study customer behaviors, preferences, and relationships to get a full 360 degree view of our customers.At Nationwide, we put members first.

We’ve always promised to protect the things that are the most important to them: their assets, their peace of mind and even their dreams, no matter how simple or grand they may be. Our brand promise, “Nationwide Is On Your Side,” is built on the core belief of building and enhancing customer relationships. We are committed to knowing and caring about our members, and being easy to do business with. Continue Reading »

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