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Fred Balboni, Business Analytics and Optimization Leader, IBM Global Business Services

Fred Balboni, Business Analytics and Optimization Leader, IBM Global Business Services

By Fred Balboni

Today’s marketplace is competitive. Successful leaders are infusing analytics throughout their enterprise to drive smarter decisions, enable faster actions and optimize outcomes. Business and technology executives alike are racing to convert data-driven insights into meaningful results.

IBM has proven experience and expertise turning data into value. But we wanted to know: are all investments created equal? Is there a secret sauce that enables one organization to derive more value from their data than another organization?

To help us answer these fundamental questions, we engaged the IBM Institute for Business Value to survey nearly 1,000 business and IT executives from around the globe. The survey was designed to identify and differentiate specific activities that can help organizations derive more value from their data. Continue Reading »

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Wes Hunt, Vice President, Customer Analytics at Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

Wes Hunt, Vice President, Customer Analytics at Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

By Wes Hunt

At my company, we have been using Big Data and analytics, as permitted by law, to transform the way we serve our customers – to provide deeply personalized services. We study customer behaviors, preferences, and relationships to get a full 360 degree view of our customers.At Nationwide, we put members first.

We’ve always promised to protect the things that are the most important to them: their assets, their peace of mind and even their dreams, no matter how simple or grand they may be. Our brand promise, “Nationwide Is On Your Side,” is built on the core belief of building and enhancing customer relationships. We are committed to knowing and caring about our members, and being easy to do business with. Continue Reading »

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Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

By Steve Hamm

IBM hosted the Cognitive Systems Colloquium at its famed IBM Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., on Oct. 2, 2013. The all-day event brought together leaders in science, technology and psychology to discuss the coming era of cognitive computing and to craft a shared agenda among industry, academia and government.

The following is a time-stamped stream of live updates and insights from the event from presenters including, Nobel Prize laureate Daniel Kahneman, A.I pioneer Danny Hillis, Irving Wladawsky-Berger, Visiting Professor, MIT and Imperial College,  and others. Continue Reading »

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Jerry Cuomo, IBM Fello

Jerry Cuomo, IBM Fellow

Tony Stone, Partner, IBM GBS

Tony Stone, Partner, IBM GBS

By Jerry Cuomo and Tony Stone

Imagine a day in the not-too-distant future when your car will alert you to a dangerous condition a mile ahead so you can slow down pro-actively or take an alternative route.

Or sensors detect abnormal wear on your brakes and the car automatically arranges for an appointment at your repair shop and even checks the parts inventory at the shop to make sure there will be no delay in getting the brake job done. Continue Reading »

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Scott Burnett, Director, Global Consumer Electronics, IBM

Scott Burnett, Director, Global Consumer Electronics, IBM

By Scott Burnett

Despite an impressive track record of pioneering technology, today’s consumer electronics industry finds itself in the throes of a of massive transformation, driven by the proliferation of Internet-enabled devices that offer new intelligence and connectivity rivaling the ubiquity of electricity.

The tectonic shift is compelling electronics companies to search for new and sustainable growth opportunities as they set course to ride the next wave of the Internet of Things. The solution for a growing number of companies lies in the increasing possibilities of data analytics and cloud computing. Continue Reading »

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August 27th, 2013
11:00
 

Martin Fleming, , Vice President, Business Performance Services, Chief Economist, IBM

Martin Fleming, Vice President, Business Performance Services, Chief Economist, IBM

By Martin Fleming

In a recent New York Times article, reporter James Glanz asks: “Is Big Data an Economic Dud?” Mr. Glanz seems to answer his own question skeptically. The “data era,” he suggests, will not match the earlier revolutions in manufacturing, domestic life and transportation.

In addition, the Wall Street Journal posted a blog discussing that Big Data is at, or near the peak of the Gartner “hype cycle” and “big data technologies are now soon to be due for a fall into the ‘trough of disillusionment.’” Continue Reading »

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John Mason, General Manager, Midmarket Business, IBM

John Mason, General Manager, Midmarket Business, IBM

By John Mason

Gone are the days when a company launched in its home market and then waited 10 years before expanding overseas.

Today, many entrepreneurs think globally from the start. What is driving this change and what does it mean for start-ups and the investors that back them?

For starters, consider the 6.8 billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Many of these are in emerging markets where users are often connecting to the internet for the very first time via a mobile device. Next, think about the explosive growth of cloud computing, where data generated from these devices through transactions, interactions and social networking can be collected, collated, analyzed and exploited. For the first time ever, there exists a massive global communications platform, providing tremendous reach for even the most modest of companies wishing to expand their horizons – literally. Continue Reading »

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Chris Thomas, Solution Architect, IBM Software Group

Chris Thomas, Solution Architect, Big Data, Analytics,  IBM Software Group

By Chris Thomas

With technology in sport advancing at such fast pace, the ways in which fans can engage with their favourite game is changing rapidly. In today’s ‘always on’ society, even when fans can’t attend a match in person, they have a whole host of ways in which they can experience the action – whether in the comfort of their home or on the move. Some argue the way modern technology has developed in providing an added layer of real-time insight and information, remote interaction is actually beginning to rival watching a game in the flesh.

As Wimbledon kicked off in London SW19 last week, the way technology is playing an increasingly key role in enhancing the fan experience can be clearly seen.Wimbledon Logo 100 2013 With ownership of smartphones and tablet computers becoming commonplace all around the world, it seems second nature for tennis fans to turn to social media to comment on the matches unfurling on their TV screens. Indeed, our Social Sentiment analysis shows that while Rafa Nadal is the most talked about player it is the Brits’ Andy Murray (37% positive, 52% neutral) and Laura Robson (44% positive, 50% neutral) who are leading the positive mentions. Continue Reading »

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Ian Cannings, Lead Process Specialist, Danfoss Power Electronics

Ian Cannings, Lead Process Specialist, Danfoss Power Electronics

By Ian Cannings

Think you only interact with software on your computer? Consider this: a vast majority of the machines and devices you interact with every day – from your car to your coffee maker – are software based. Countless hours were poured into developing the software that makes these products run smoothly, but one single misstep in thousands, if not millions of lines of code can result in improper stopping power or a cool cup of coffee.

At Danfoss, we make products that save energy, costs and reduce the CO2 emissions of our customers. These products are used in areas such as cooling food, air conditioning, heating buildings, and controlling electric motors. As we produce smarter products, we face a new reality: with innovation comes more code. And more code means greater room for error. So, our challenge is to address this complexity within our devices – and the increasing interactions between mechanical, software and electrical components – without slowing development, raising risk, or escalating costs. Continue Reading »

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Paul Brody, Global Industry Leader, Electronics, IBM

Paul Brody, Global Industry Leader, Electronics, IBM

By Paul Brody

3D printing, intelligent robotics, and open source hardware are three emerging technologies that stand to revolutionize modern-day manufacturing. These disruptive forces will usher in a new manufacturing paradigm that is managed by software and data files – something we call the “software-defined supply chain.”

For more than a year, my colleagues and I have been carefully studying the likely impact and implications of these technologies. We wanted to see if these new technologies could alleviate many of the constraints and the fixed costs of a traditional supply chain, and if so, to what extent? To verify this, we built an integrated supply chain model and then tore apart a series of electronics items – including a mobile phone, a hearing aid, a washing machine, and an industrial display. Continue Reading »

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