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October 6th, 2015
12:53
 

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John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

John E. Kelly III, Senior Vice President, IBM

By John E. Kelly III

When the original Watson won on the TV quiz show Jeopardy in 2011, it was one computer tucked away in a room at IBM Research. Now it’s in our cloud, available anywhere.

Back then, Watson consisted of a single software application powered by five core technologies. Today, it includes 28 cognitive services. Each represents a different mode of thinking–visual recognition, personality insights, relationship extraction and tradeoff analytics, to name a few. And more are on the way…

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Read the full story on IBM’s new THINK blog.

 

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Deepak Advani, General Manager, IBM Commerce

Deepak Advani, General Manager, IBM Commerce

By Deepak Advani

What is it that separates homo sapiens from our fellow animals? Psychologists, anthropologists, artists, zoologists and many other “ists” have proposed many different ideas, but as they have not reached a consensus, I feel free to offer my own opinion: it is invention that sets humans apart.

“Language” is a popular proposal yet what is human language (not the capacity for language, but language itself) if not an invention? Other animals use tools, but it is humans alone who relentlessly imagine, improvise, tinker and create a seemingly infinite number of things to help us with every aspect of our lives. Continue Reading »

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Dario Gil, VP, Science & Technology, IBM Research

Dario Gil, VP, Science & Technology, IBM Research

By Dario Gil

IBM Research scientists launched the nanotechnology revolution when they designed the scanning-tunneling microscope in 1981, and our researchers have achieved numerous nanotech breakthroughs since then–including being the first people in the world to move single atoms.

Now comes an advance that delivers on the promise of nanotechnology–potentially extending the life of Moore’s Law by enabling major performance improvements over today’s conventional chip technology.

A team at our Yorktown, New York, lab overcame one of the most daunting challenges facing the chip industry by demonstrating the first carbon nanotube transistors that don’t suffer from reduced performance as they’re shrunk to smaller dimensions. Read about their invention in the Oct. 2 edition of Science.

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The University of Michigan's Aurum 2

The University of Michigan’s Aurum 2

By Steve Hamm
IBM Chief Storyteller

In the solar energy realm, nothing beats the drama and fun of the biennial Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, an 1800-mile race in solar-powered cars across the Australian outback. Teams from dozens of universities around the world compete for global bragging rights–combining precision teamwork with advances in software, electronics, materials and aerodynamic design.

For this year’s race, which will take place October 18 to 25, there’s an exciting new technology in play: cognitive computing. IBM Research scientists are collaborating with the University of Michigan’s solar car team to provide solar forecasting technology they hope will give the team’s car, Aurum, a decisive edge.

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September 30th, 2015
9:01
 

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Casey Dugan, software engineer with IBM Research

Casey Dugan, Software Engineer, IBM Research

By Casey Dugan

“We can give you loads of data.”

That’s what I said to IBM Senior Vice President of Solutions Portfolio and Research, John Kelly, III, when he asked why we installed a little “selfie” station in the lobby of the IBM Research Lab in Cambridge, Mass.

I installed the simple system in April of 2014 by connecting a web cam to a touchscreen monitor, all just to find out what people would do with it.

The idea came about when our team visited the Cognitive Environments lab in Yorktown Heights (home of IBM’s Thomas J Watson Research Center). We watched these amazing immersive environment demos for emergency planning and other real-world scenarios. So, we wondered, “what could we do in our lab?” Continue Reading »

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Erich Clementi, Chairman and SVP IBM Europe

Erich Clementi, Chairman and SVP IBM Europe

By Erich Clementi

At a recent roundtable in Brussels on the Digital Transformation of Industry, hosted by Gunther Oettinger, EU Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, I joined other European business leaders to discuss ways to energize the digital transformation of Europe’s industrial sector. Across Europe, digitalization raises the potential for increasing flexibility, efficiency, productivity, competitiveness –- all helping to create jobs and growth.

One theme that drew much interest was IBM’s concept of a public digital framework and the role it could play in the Digital Transformation of Industry. Such a framework would ensure that all players in Europe’s industrial base have access to the latest game-changing technologies, ideas and services. Continue Reading »

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Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

Rob High, CTO, IBM Watson

By Rob High

IBM has long played a major role in Silicon Valley. We built a manufacturing plant there in 1943 and opened our IBM Research lab in San Jose in 1956–since then producing a string of technology breakthroughs including the first disk drive, the first data mining algorithms and essential advances in nanotechnology.  My dad got his start as an IBM engineer in the Valley in 1958, so it has a special place in my heart.

IBM’s Watson business, which is based in New York City, is collaborating with dozens of startups in the Valley and San Francisco; and IBM’s venture group has close working relationships with a number of leading venture capitalists there.

To take Watson even further, today, IBM is greatly expanding our presence in this cradle of global technology innovation. We’re opening a Watson hub in San Francisco. This will put IBM closer to, and increase collaboration with, the local start ups, developers, venture capital groups, and academics we’re working with. We’ll host activities aimed at sparking a new wave of innovation built on advances in cognitive computing.

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Deepak Advani, General Manager, IBM Commerce

Deepak Advani, General Manager, IBM Commerce

By Deepak Advani

Today’s news that IBM will open a Watson hub in San Francisco represents an exciting move that will allow us to continue working with hundreds of developers and dozens of start-ups in the Silicon Valley to advance our Watson cognitive computing platform. Now let me tell you why I’m particularly excited by this new Watson hub.

One of the most promising areas for cognitive computing is Commerce and as part of this news we are moving the global IBM Commerce headquarters to San Francisco. I’m personally thrilled to be moving to the Bay Area, and even more so to be focusing on fueling the next generation of cognitive commerce innovations with the innovative and exciting clients, partners, venture capitalists and start-ups in the region.  Continue Reading »

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Kevin Skapinetz, Director of Strategy and Product Marketing, IBM Security

Kevin Skapinetz, Director of Strategy and Product Marketing, IBM Security

By Kevin Skapinetz

A few years back, companies began listening to employees who wanted to bring their own devices (BYOD) to work. They established security policies to allow the use of personal devices for accessing company information anytime, anywhere.

Not surprisingly, the workforce continues to look outside the corporate walls for new ways to get their jobs done and one go-to technology are the cloud apps they use in their daily lives.

As of today, however, most organizations have visibility into only a fraction of the third-party apps their employees are using for work purposes. Making matters worse, many lack the ability to manage and secure the data and files their employees are uploading and share to these apps.

But instead fighting the trend, we believe businesses should embrace “bring your own apps” as well as BYOD, to work. Continue Reading »

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September 22nd, 2015
7:00
 

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Colleen Arnold, Senior Vice President, Sales and Distribution, IBM

Colleen Arnold, Senior Vice President, Sales and Distribution, IBM

By Colleen Arnold

I’m a mother of two and have a husband with a demanding job. I also have outside interests and hobbies, and work as a Senior Vice President at IBM.  It’s not always easy to balance it all but I feel fortunate to work at a company that values the unique capabilities and contributions of working moms.

2015 marks the 30th consecutive year that IBM has been named to Working Mother’s 100 Best Companies – a record we are proud of and don’t take for granted.  In fact, there are only two companies on the list since it launched – the other is Johnson & Johnson. You can read more about it here. Continue Reading »

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