Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
Smarter Planet
October 20th, 2014
6:15
 

Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President for Systems and Technology Group and Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President, Systems and Technology Group and Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

By Tom Rosamilia

IBM has always taken the long view of its business strategy, continuously reinventing – from  divesting its PC business to more recently its x86 business.

Today’s announcement that GLOBALFOUNDRIES plans to acquire IBM’s global commercial semiconductor technology business is one more step in the company’s reinvention. The Agreement reinforces IBM’s clear path, commitment and vision for systems and hardware.

IBM’s proven model for success is driven by focusing on the high-value segments of our systems portfolio driven by the unique innovation that only IBM can bring. GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ business model is to innovate through high-volume semiconductor manufacturing, which is enhanced by economies of scale.

If you’ve been following IBM’s hardware business closely, you’ve heard us talk about the need to continuously transform our business. OpenPOWER, Software-Defined Storage, Flash memory, connecting mobile and the mainframe and the sale of our x86 business to Lenovo are a few of the most recent examples. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

Ronan Rooney, IBM Research, Cúram Product Strategy

By Ronan Rooney

There has been a lot of discussion about the cost of health care and many suggestions about how we can improve population health.

Traditional models of care focus on individual episodes and they work really well for people with simple clinical, behavioral or social challenges. Where they fall down is when they’re applied to people who have multiple or complex challenges – the people we consider the most vulnerable.

As part of IBM’s Curam Research Team, we’re very focused on finding new ways to help those vulnerable citizens who are responsible for a disproportionate amount of healthcare expenditure – the top 5% of spenders drive 45%-50% of total medical spending. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

SP Sensor on BoatBy Harry Kolar

One year ago, IBM, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Fund for Lake George announced the Jefferson Project, an ambitious effort to model the entire lake – its depths and shoreline – to get a holistic and accurate view of everything happening in and around one of the United State’s pristine lakes.

The goals of the project are multifold and include understanding and managing the complex factors impacting the lake, from invasive species, pollution, and other factors, to developing a template to use in other fresh water bodies around the globe. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share
October 15th, 2014
10:53
 

Mark Thorsen, CEO, GreenMatch

Mark Thorsen, CEO, GreenMatch

By Mark Thorsen

No matter where you look, the amount of information worldwide is exploding and the area of renewable energy is not immune. As the use and deployment of renewables grows, so too, is the amount of data the technologies surrounding these energies are generating.

Everything from solar panels to wind turbines are creating vast amounts of new data that require collection, extraction, warehousing, analysis and statistics, all to make it available in the right way.

Such functions are creating an enormous amount of information, all of which is starting to flood into utilities at a high rate. This information must be analyzed and followed up on. At the same time, more utilities are hanging onto more data than in the past, making retention and retention costs critical issues going forward. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Duncan Johnston-Watt, CEO, Cloudsoft Corporation

Duncan Johnston-Watt, CEO, Cloudsoft Corporation

By Duncan Johnston-Watt

The revolutionary potential of cloud is a topic that’s much discussed today, with many drawing comparisons between the emergence of cloud and the advent of the Internet age.

And with good reason: there are striking similarities in the way both of these innovations are transforming the way organizations collaborate, communicate and create.

And much like the beginnings of the Internet Age, we see some companies taking the plunge, while others are adopting a more conservative approach. It should come as no surprise that the “born on the web” companies have been early adopters while enterprises have been somewhat more reserved in their exploitation of cloud. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Erick Brethenoux, Director, Business Analytics and Decision Management Strategy, IBM Software Group

Erick Brethenoux, Director, Business Analytics and Decision Management Strategy, IBM Software Group

By Erick Brethenoux

Emotional moments can be the most powerful ones we experience. They are transient, yet long-lasting. They happen quickly but can dissolve in an instant, leaving us with a moment we may never forget. They are a big part of what makes us human.

If we could better understand the reasons and circumstances around particular emotional moments, we could better understand our clients, patrons and constituents. In fact, organizations are doing just that and using things like predictive analytics to uncover connections from data we gather on a daily basis.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

Bernard Tyson, CEO, Kaiser Permanente

By Bernard Tyson

Since shortly after Kaiser Permanente’s launch in 1945, this organization has been at the forefront of using technology to improve patient care. We started collecting large amounts of data about patients and treatment outcomes long before electronic medical records and “big data” became hot topics. And, today, we remain one of the early adopters of cutting-edge technology in the healthcare industry.

Like other healthcare organizations, we take advantage of technology to make our operations more efficient and to help deliver superior care. But I believe that information technology can play an even more important role in this industry: It can help us transform from focusing on healthcare to focusing on health.

What do I mean by that? To me, the term healthcare connotes being reactive to problems. That’s not enough. An organization that focuses more broadly on health itself can help people extend their lives and live healthier lives. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Terry Jones, Executive Chairman, WayBlazer

Terry Jones, Executive Chairman, WayBlazer

By Terry Jones

My first job when I got out of college in 1971 was as a receptionist at a travel agency in Chicago. In those days, believe it or not, we used telegrams to make international reservations.

It’s amazing to think how far travel has come since then—and the role that information technology has played in those changes.

Today, the travel industry is primed for yet another revolution. This time, cognitive computing is the agent of change, and my company, WayBlazer, is one of the industry pioneers.

WayBlazer taps into the power of IBM’s Watson to help Web sites create travel experiences that fit the interests and budgets of individual consumers. It’s a step towards a time in the future when, I believe, computers will serve as truly personal travel advisors—enabling people to do everything from arranging the perfect vacation to making last minute-changes with the minimum of fuss.

Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Posted by
in

Professor Jane den Hollander, Vice-Chancellor, Deakin University

Professor Jane den Hollander, Vice-Chancellor, Deakin University

By Jane den Hollander

The core objective of any university is to enrich and extend the minds of our students, setting them up with the right skills and knowledge for life and for employment. For those arriving on campus for the first time, however, getting accustomed to everything from class locations to extracurricular schedules can leave little headspace for learning.

At Deakin University, we’ve long felt that the quality of student information directly impacts the quality of their subsequent learning experiences – we believe in being bold and offering a premium learning experience for students to thrive in any environment, with the skills and values to enable life-long success.

A range of initiatives, including our one-stop personal information and learning site for students called DeakinSync, saw us ranked the highest in our state for overall student learning satisfaction. SP Think ForumBut we’re constantly asking ourselves the question: how can we make learning at Deakin as frictionless and personalised as possible for our students? Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Posted by
in

Myung J. Lee, Executive Director of Cities of Service, based in Manhattan

Myung J. Lee, Executive Director of Cities of Service, based in Manhattan

By Myung J. Lee

When you read about governments using data today it’s often about how they’re using things like analytics to help national concerns such as health care, or public safety issues, such as the NYPD’s CompStat program. But mayors are becoming some of the biggest consumers of data, and cities are using analytics in innovative ways that never before seemed possible.

That convergence of government services and data is one of the things being discussed this week at the ThinkForum in Manhattan, where IBM is engaging with leaders from around the world to talk about how analytics can help change cities, countries and industries.

SP Think ForumMayors are working with nonprofits, local agencies, and others to engage and empower their citizens to solve real problems in their communities — with data, and despite fewer resources than ever before. The real stories are inspiring, and the possibilities for replication are endless. Continue Reading »

Bookmark and Share

Subscribe to this category Subscribe to Smarter Planet