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Building a Smarter Planet. A Smarter Planet Blog.


 

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(Photo: Graciela Pierre)

(Photo: Graciela Pierre)

By Eric-Mark Huitema

In order to transform transportation systems, we must first commit to fully understanding them and their millions of data points in constant motion.

Rebuilding the transportation infrastructure from scratch isn’t feasible. Rather we must improve upon existing systems using the multitude of data our industry generates; reconciling information such as what, where and when we move; how a particular model of vehicle performs in a variety of environments; and how many cars versus public transport options are on the road at any given location or any given time.

All of this must then by synchronized in real-time, no small task given that there are more than one billion vehicles on the road in the world today. That’s why while walking the show floor at the World Congress on Intelligent Transport Systems this week I was encouraged to see a unified vision and passion to make every aspect of transportation more intelligent. Continue Reading »

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Sean Hogan, General Manager, Vice President, Healthcare, IBM

Sean Hogan, General Manager, Vice President, Healthcare, IBM

By Sean Hogan

If you or someone you know has ever been diagnosed with a serious illness like cancer or heart disease, you know what a life-changing experience it is. In that moment, the availability of effective treatment options and the pace of medical research become crucial determinants in successfully fighting the disease.

But before any new treatments become available, it must first be tested in rigorous clinical trials – the “gold standard” of medical evidence. In the U.S., $95 billion is spent on medical research each year, yet only 6% of clinical trials are completed on time, according to the Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation. Continue Reading »

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Dr. Michael Haydock, IBM Fellow, Data Scientist, Global Business Services

Dr. Michael Haydock, IBM Fellow, Data Scientist, Global Business Services

By Dr. Michael Haydock

It’s that time of year again – the back to school season. Summer is coming to a close, days are getting shorter and parents are sending their kids back to the classroom. But what does that mean for retailers?  My quarterly retail forecast shows a strong back to school season and parents with bigger, more confident wallets.

The economy is continuing to improve, slowly but steadily, with the unemployment rate decreasing at around 6 percent, although not yet reaching pre-recessions levels. Consumer confidence in the third quarter is the highest it’s been in eight years – people are confident in their future, income, and prospects – which means they are more likely to spend at the store. Continue Reading »

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September, 3rd 2014
18:52
 

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Michael Dixon, General Manager, Smarter Cities, IBM

Michael Dixon, General Manager, Smarter Cities, IBM

By Michael Dixon

Since the earliest days of humanity, dealing with waste has been a fundamental requirement of our existence. However our underlying and very successful technique over the eons has been straight forward: take it away from here and bury it somewhere else.

While that remains the dominant practice throughout the world today, some cities have sophisticated the technique so the approach is now: burn what we can, and take the rest away from here and bury it. But times are changing. While sustainability has become a powerful force in modern societies, everybody now readily understands that burying waste is just such, well, a waste. Continue Reading »

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August, 29th 2014
17:50
 

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Twilight on the streets of Sao Felix do Xingu, Brazil. (Photo: Steve Hamm)

Twilight in Sao Felix do Xingu, Brazil, a frontier town of the Rainforest. (Photo: Steve Hamm)

By Steve Hamm, IBM Writer

(SAO FELIX, Brazil) The Internet takes a torturous route to get to Sao Felix do Xingu.

A private company has built a series of radio signal repeater towers, powered by solar panels, which bring the Net 400 kilometers from a neighboring state to downtown Sao Felix.

Once it gets there, it stays put. There’s very little connectivity elsewhere in a municipality that’s the size of Portugal. For those who have it, mainly government offices and businesses, it’s expensive and slow: $500 a month for 1 megabit-per-second service, or $100 for 128 k speed. Continue Reading »

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Scott Spangler, Principal Data Scientist, IBM Watson Innovations, demonstrates how IBM Watson cognitive technology can now visually display connections in scientific literature and drug information.  In this image, Watson displays protein pathways that can help researchers accelerate scientific breakthroughs by spotting linkages that were previously undetected. (Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

Scott Spangler, Principal Data Scientist, IBM Watson Innovations, demonstrates how IBM Watson cognitive technology can now visually display connections in scientific literature and drug information. (Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

By Michael Rhodin

When IBM’s original Watson computer competed and won on the TV quiz show Jeopardy!, it demonstrated to an audience of millions how a computer could understand the rules of a game and quickly retrieve facts from a vast storehouse of information.

That question-answering skill is a key element of what we call the era of cognitive computing. It is already beginning to impact whole domains of human endeavor, starting with the way physicians treat diseases. And it’s improving the productivity of business—by beginning to transform online shopping and customer service. Continue Reading »

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Matt Gross, Edtior, Bon Appetit

Matt Gross, Edtior, Bon Appetit

By Matt Gross

It was the middle of summer and all I could think about were – tomatoes. They’d just started coming into farmers’ markets en masse and I was eager to start eating them atop toast in the morning, sliced with cucumbers into salads, and chopped into sweet-spicy salsas.

But I wasn’t supposed to be thinking about tomatoes. The IBM and Bon Appétit teams were supposed to be planning the next phase in the development of Chef Watson, our cognitive-cooking system. We’d recently begun a beta test with people pulled from the ranks of our readership in which we issued a challenge. In my mind, there was only one challenge that made sense.

“Tomatoes,” I said. “Tomatoes in anything—anything but salad.” Continue Reading »

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Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President for Systems and Technology Group and Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President for Systems and Technology Group and Integrated Supply Chain, IBM

By Tom Rosamilia

The world in which we work, live and interact is changing – quickly and drastically. Consider this: more than 6.6 billion people, or 93 percent of the global population, are using mobile and social technologies as a fundamental means of conducting business and interacting with the world around them. These connections generate 2.5 billion gigabytes of data – every day.

Increasingly, as society becomes even more interconnected, data volumes will continue to explode. This is big data – big in volume and even bigger in potential. According to IBM research, 90 percent of all the data in the world has been generated over the last two years. In fact, IDC projects that by 2020 the digital universe will reach 40 zettabytes (ZB), which is 40 trillion GB of data – or 5,200 GB of data for every person on Earth. The explosion of mobile transactions and social applications has fueled this growth exponentially. Continue Reading »

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Molly Biddiscombe of Manhattan interacts with the U.S. Open iPad app designed by IBM in collaboration with the United States Tennis Association (USTA) while en route to the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, NY on Monday, August 25, 2014. (Photo: Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM.)

Molly Biddiscombe of Manhattan interacts with the U.S. Open iPad app designed by IBM in collaboration with the USTA. (Photo: Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service.)

By Nicole Jeter West

The US Open Tennis Championships is the largest annually attended event in the world and, over the next two weeks, more than 700,000 fans will descend upon Queens, N.Y., to watch world-class tennis players compete at the USTA National Tennis Center.

Millions of other fans, no matter where they live in the world, will turn to apps on mobile devices, as well as to USOpen.org via the Web to see live scores, stats, video, photo galleries and more.

Our core mission at the United States Tennis Association is to promote and enable the growth of tennis. As the largest tennis association in the world, we have about 800,000 members and are committed to encouraging the sport’s growth on every level — from local communities to our crown jewel, the US Open. Continue Reading »

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By Dr. Shannon McMurtrey

With enrollment in information technology programs back on the rise, it’s our duty as educators to make sure our students graduate with skills that are immediately applicable in order for them to enter the job market more marketable and competitive.

However, there are few industries evolving more rapidly than information technology. This creates a challenge for students as well as faculty who have to adapt their curricula to changing workforce demands. For us at Missouri State University, this means preparing our students to provide value to businesses that are increasingly turning to cloud, analytics and mobile to solve complex problems.

SP MSU campus

Missouri State University campus, Springfield, MO.

Continue Reading »

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