Students for a Smarter Planet ..leaders with conscience
Computing
March 21st, 2015
5:28
 

Well, it’s Spring here in the U.S.  There’s an old saying that tells us that Spring is when a young man’s fancy turns to thoughts of love.  After the wicked way Old Man Winter treated us this year, and all the *#$! snow shoveling, everyone could most certainly use a dose of a more gentle activity.  Here’s a little science to go along with the emotion…funny enough, this particular article is from the Daily Mail published in the U.K. – where they are renowned for their ‘stiff upper lip’ and cool, dispassionate response to life.  Maybe that’s why it’s a science article and not a sonnet?  The research comes from Professor Xiaochu Zhang of the University of Science and Technology of China

Scan that says it’s true love:

Brain experts say they can tell what stage of

romance someone is at by looking at MRI results

 

And here’s a little bit about different types of love from BrainHQ

Brain love

 

And from the city that saw the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, research at the University of Chicago shows A region deep inside the brain controls how quickly people make decisions about love

So, while you’re chasing butterflies and composing songs to celebrate your sweetie this Spring, think about what’s going on inside your head that makes it all so wonderful!

 

 

Bookmark and Share

…brought to you by

 

IBM Deep Thunder

 

The weather is an ever-changing source of fascination for everyone – no matter which part of the planet you inhabit.  The seasons go round, and with these cycles, weather takes on different aspects.  You can get the weather report from your TV, radio, smart phone or a myriad of other sources.  But, generally, these are localized reports and pertain to traffic conditions, school/business closures and the like.  In other words, how the stuff going on outside your door is going to affect you personally.

Deep Thunder is a more complex system -  it “focuses on the operational problems that weather can present to businesses in very specific locales—challenges that traditional meteorology doesn’t address.”  The roots of this technology date back to 1995, when IBM and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) joined forces to take on the challenge of targeted forecasting.  Read the full story by clicking the picture below:

Deep Thunder

As our planet continues to evolve, and we seek new ways to be Smarter in all our business decisions and use of the Earth’s resources,  Deep Thunder may be a big player for strategists seeking to ensure best outcomes.  Are you thinking of going the route of entrepreneurship?  Perhaps Deep Thunder will serve to aid you in making choices about whatever project you’re seeking to establish!

 

Bookmark and Share
March 11th, 2015
6:37
 

Bionics used to be the stuff of fantasy and featured grandly on several U.S. television series.  In the world of everyday life, there are a good number of individuals who, for reasons of birth defect, disease or as the result of a (usually) shocking accident do not enjoy  ‘freedom’ of motion and sensory perception.  Until now, prosthetic replacements for amputated limbs have been limited to those with superlative insurance to cover the cost of these devices.  We hope that is about to change…

A company in Argentina – Bioparx Health Technology – has developed a state-of-the-art bionic arm for less than half of what the others cost.   Read about their technology here:  Smart Prosthetics

Bionic hand

Photo credit: bioparx site

And pay a visit to the bioparx company site to see if there’s a place for you to contribute (or be inspired to envision the next generation of their products…).  The site is in Spanish, so if you’re bilingual, this may be a great fit for you!  BIOPARX.COM 

You may also want to pay a visit to Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden where they, too, are working on bionic technologies.

Bookmark and Share

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal…  If you don’t have a sibling, maybe Pepper could fill the void for you, too?  Bet he won’t eat the last of your favorite snack like a human little brother!

SoftBank Unveils Pricing

 

for Humanoid Robot Pepper

 

By Eric Pfanner

A man poses as SoftBank’s humanoid robot Pepper takes a picture.
Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

 

SoftBank says it will sell its new humanoid robot, Pepper, at less than the cost of production, but it will charge hefty monthly fees for the pleasure of its company.

The Japanese telecommunications giant plans to offer 300 of the ‘bots to developers, starting this Friday, at an upfront price of ¥198,000 (about $1,660). Monthly fees, however, will range up to ¥24,600 for a three-year contract.

SoftBank, which owns Sprint Corp. and a mobile network in Japan, recently delayed consumer sales of Pepper until the summer, but it plans to offer 300 of the robots to application developers in the meantime.

As of Friday, developers will be able to place orders for the first sizable production run; an undisclosed number of Peppers were previously shipped to encourage developers to create smartphone-style apps for the robots.

The monthly costs comprise a basic service fee of ¥14,800, which will offer cloud artificial intelligence capabilities, using SoftBank’s mobile network. That way, the robots—and app developers—can learn from each other by gathering data on what their owners do with them. SoftBank says about 100 apps will be available as of Friday.

SoftBank will also offer an “insurance plan,” at ¥9,800 a month, providing support and preferential pricing on repairs.

The company envisions Pepper as a companion for the elderly, a teacher of schoolchildren and an assistant in retail shops, among other uses. It is one of a number of robotics projects that are aimed at dealing with labor shortages as Japan’s population ages.

______________________________________________________

Bookmark and Share
February 27th, 2015
5:43
 

Decades ago, a now-classic episode of the TV program “I Love Lucy” had a hilarious sketch involving Lucy and her best friend, Ethel, hand rolling and packaging chocolates on a conveyer belt.  This particular show is still among my favorites – not least because it involved chocolate, of which I am passionately fond!

There have been a lot of advances in assembly-line technology since then.  Here’s a look at:

The rarely-seen robots that

 

package what we eat

 

 Delta robotsThe robots actually in factories don’t have hands…they’re more unusual (SPL)

And a very interesting look at the man who ‘started it all’:  Reymond Clavel of EPFL (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne)

 

Robots are handling many of the tasks that used to require human dexterity.  Are you part of the advance of the machines? (Although, they probably won’t make you laugh til you cry like Lucy and Ethel did!)

Bookmark and Share

Subscribe to this category Subscribe to Computing

 
ChatClick here to chat!+