Students for a Smarter Planet ..leaders with conscience
Entrepreneur

As a follow on to the Vertical Farms blog post by Kimberly (published August 6th), read about this Thesis project from Philipp Hutfless who’s studying Industrial Design at University of Applied Sciences in Darmstadt,  Germany.  He was inspired by a trip to Japan which sparked his desire to design a food system that could be sustained offshore.

Here’s a sketch of his work in his own words on the

James Dyson Foundation website:

 

Vereos

 

Another description of the project is posted on the Fast Company exist website  (They have all kinds of reviews, musings, op ed pieces and product information on their site – check it out) Floating Ocean Greenhouses Bring Fresh Food Closer To Megacities

 

 

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August 26th, 2014
6:37
 

Meg Grant, of Solar Fiber, and co-collaborators Aniela Hoitink, Marina Toeters, Ralf Jacobs, and Professor Derek Schlettwein from Giessen University are pushing the textile boundaries with the creation of solar fibers.

Wearable Solar is an unconventional sustainable answer to our increasing demand for energy and connectivity.

The Wearable Solar collection currently consists of two designs, a coat and a dress made of wool and leather, which produce energy through their integrated solar cells. When worn in full sun for two hours, both garments can generate enough energy to allow a typical smartphone to be 100% charged. The solar cell compartments can be opened and revealed to the sun when needed and folded back when they are not being used.

 

Wearable Solar Dress by Pauline Van Dongen

Read about these new products and others that harness kinetic energy to power our electronic devices

Solar Fiber would welcome suggestions or collaborations from people with expertise in this area (in either Dutch or English) – please email:  info@solarfiber.nl

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While cricket consumption isn’t new in the world, the western world has not embraced this way of eating.

In the year 2050 it is estimated that the Earth will be populated by 9 billion people. A sustainable alternative to meat production that will produce enough for everyone, without posing additional stress on the environment is being sought. One such protein source is insects.

Insects have marginal environmental impact. They produce virtually no methane, reproduce extremely quickly, and require minimal feed, water and space. It is estimated that crickets are 20x more efficient to raise for protein than cattle.

eXo, a new start-up in Brooklyn, NY is banking on the success of their protein bars which are made with cricket flour. Their mission is to “normalize insect consumption”. Two Brown University graduates think they have created the perfect food item that American’s will find palatable.

Stockholm is really ramping up their cricket production with plans to create InsectCity and BuzzBuilding.

blog cricket house

Belatchew Labs has developed plans to make Stockholm a sustainable, cricket-consuming city with InsectCity and Buzz Building, an integrated network for cricket cultivation and consumption.

Do you embrace this food source? Will you make it a part of your daily diet?

 

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Great opportunity for some no-cost instruction!  Learn more about the details concerning the topics to be covered, the amount of time per week you need to invest, and how this course can assist you in focusing your current studies to plan a career in the global economy post-graduation.  Click the link below (and watch the course intro video on their website, too).

Case Western Reserve University is offering a FREE on-line six week course called “Beyond Silicon Valley:  Growing Entrepreneurship in Transitioning Economies”.  The course is from October 3 – November 21.  You’ll get a certificate at the end from Case Western.

Beyond Silicon Valley: Growing Entrepreneurship in Transitioning Economies

Explore how communities in transitioning economies around the world are working to enable the growth of entrepreneurship when the resources from the private sector alone are limited.

Instructor     M Goldberg Case Western

About the Course
The path for entrepreneurs to grow their companies outside of well-developed entrepreneurial ecosystems like Silicon Valley is challenging. Most markets around the world do not look like Silicon Valley, and they never will. But there are other models to support new businesses. In transitioning markets (where entrepreneurs do not have much access to private sector financing), government officials, donors, and business leaders are experimenting with creative approaches to support the growth of entrepreneurs.

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August 14th, 2014
6:06
 

Excess heat is a wasted by-product of many industrial processes. Weizmann Institute of Science reports on an Israeli start-up that has discovered a way to capture this industrial by-product and turn it into fuel.  While this new process has not yet been put into production, the test data supports a very compelling debate.

Besides being a sustainable source of energy, an advantage of using released industrial heat rather than solar energy is that the former is released 24 hours a day, while solar energy heat can only be generated between 8 and 10 hours daily.

blog weizmann

Prototype of the the excess heat system setup. Photo: COURTESY NEW CO2FUELS

With plans on the table with two companies in Europe – the largest steel manufacturer in the world, and an engineering and equipment supplier, it remains to be seen how successful this new process will be.

Do you think this transformation of excess heat into fuel will reap substantial benefits?

Read about the proposed plan to execute this process

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