Students for a Smarter Planet ..leaders with conscience
Finding Jobs
May 1st, 2015
5:07
 

How would you like to ‘glide unseen’ into an area?  While Harry Potter and countless other fictional characters have used cloaks of invisibility to achieve that trick, we more mundane beings have limited powers to make ourselves non-intrusive.  And some folks are better at it than others…my laugh is so recognizable, it’s been the subject of much commentary over the years.  But, if I could clamp down on my tendency to be mirthful, maybe I have a shot at not standing out in the crowd?

Read about tech that’s making at least part of you unrecognizable…  Developed by AVG in the Czech Republic,

New glasses make you

invisible to facial recognition technology

Invisibilty glasses

AVG’s invisibility glasses. (Credit: AVG)

“The glasses, they explained, could help prevent smartphone users from snapping and uploading unwanted and potentially embarrassing photos of you. They can also prevent your likeness from being captured and featured in Google StreetView or other big-data projects.

Sorta’ makes you feel like a super-hero, doesn’t it?  What potential good (or harm) do you see resulting from this technology?  Is there an improvement or offshoot that you can envision?  AVG is a worldwide company – take a look at their job opps across the globe here:  Careers at AVG

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April 27th, 2015
5:16
 

Almost everyone has experienced the frustration of trying to get the last bit of a product to shake loose from its container.  It’s virtually impossible to expend a tube of toothpaste completely or get the clinging bits from a can of some products.  Hence, a great deal of waste takes place.

Now there’s a new product, created by Kripa K. Varanasi, a professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., and J. David Smith, the graduate student turned chief executive.  They’ve come up with a coating that makes the inside of the bottle permanently wet and slippery.

M.I.T. was sponsoring a $100,000 contest for entrepreneurial ideas. Mr. Smith and Dr. Varanasi decided to enter. Over a weekend, Mr. Smith developed a prototype of a ketchup bottle. Using a video of ketchup sliding out, they were the runner-up and won the Audience Choice Award.  Currently the product is generating interest from food packaging companies.

“The company is also exploring the industrial applications originally envisioned, including coatings for petroleum storage tanks and pipelines. That could not only reduce the energy needed to push materials through the pipes, but also speed cleaning of tanks, with fewer chemicals.”

 

Profiled by The New York Times, prepare to meet

LiquiGlide

 

And be sure to visit the company’s website by clicking the logo below to learn more about their product, their company, and possible job opportunities!

LiquiGlide

 

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April 15th, 2015
6:22
 

Continuous strides are being made in the field of healthcare.  Research has taken on challenges that were thought to be insurmountable.  New technology is enhancing the methods by which ‘care and cure’ may be offered.

Read this compelling story on a life-changing gadget developed by Tom Bieling.

The glove that transmits

 

‘touch’ over the internet

 

“Bieling, a researcher at the Design Lab in Berlin, has developed a glove kitted out with fabric pressure-sensors. By translating a tactile hand touch alphabet into digital text, the mobile glove could eliminate the necessity of hand-to-hand physical contact for deaf-blind communication. Even better, because a great deal of online communication is text-based, the glove could act as a translating device that allows people who are deaf-blind to communicate freely with anyone – and for anyone to communicate with them.”

Tactile glove

In the current version, users can adjust the intensity and speed of the incoming tactile messages according to their reading skills (Design Research Lab)

 

Is there a job waiting for you in Berlin? Check and see: http://www.design-research-lab.org/jobs/

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Ever think about the machines behind the machines?  I really hadn’t given it much thought myself – until I stumbled on this particular announcement about a machine that performs laser deposition welding and precision milling.  What’s so great about it?

“By combining both, additive manufacturing via powder nozzle and the traditional cutting method in one machine, totally new applications and geometries are possible. Especially large workpieces with high stock removal volumes are now possible to be machined in an economical way.”

Read more on the actual product specs here:  LASERTEC 65 3D

Having made its debut at IMTS (International Manufacturing Technology Show) 2014, the new machine by DMG Mori was pulled straight off the line from its Davis California plant – machines, the company says, that are “made in the USA for the USA.”  Read the pre-announcement about the product at American Machinist.

DMG Mori

Part 3-D printer, part machine tool, the Lasertec 65 3D can produce parts in steel, nickel and cobalt alloys, brass or titanium.  (Photo Credit: americanmachinist.com)

 

And, it you’re not convinced that this is a way cool technology – watch the video on Gizmodo!

If this stuff fascinates you, check out job opps at DMG Mori by clicking here:  DMG Mori logo

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March 11th, 2015
6:37
 

Bionics used to be the stuff of fantasy and featured grandly on several U.S. television series.  In the world of everyday life, there are a good number of individuals who, for reasons of birth defect, disease or as the result of a (usually) shocking accident do not enjoy  ‘freedom’ of motion and sensory perception.  Until now, prosthetic replacements for amputated limbs have been limited to those with superlative insurance to cover the cost of these devices.  We hope that is about to change…

A company in Argentina – Bioparx Health Technology – has developed a state-of-the-art bionic arm for less than half of what the others cost.   Read about their technology here:  Smart Prosthetics

Bionic hand

Photo credit: bioparx site

And pay a visit to the bioparx company site to see if there’s a place for you to contribute (or be inspired to envision the next generation of their products…).  The site is in Spanish, so if you’re bilingual, this may be a great fit for you!  BIOPARX.COM 

You may also want to pay a visit to Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden where they, too, are working on bionic technologies.

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