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Public safety

McMaster University has developed a process whereby ordinary inkjet printers can be given a special cartridge containing DNA-based bio-ink that produces paper sensors patterned after the codenames of pathogens.

Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water.

blog pathogens“In the published paper, we detect ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is a marker of bacterial contamination, and PDGF (platelet derived growth factor), which is a marker for cancer,” Brennan explained. “We can print the letter ‘A’ for ATP and ‘P’ for PDGF, so that the letter encodes the compound detected. This allows us to do something we call multiplexing, where we can use any combination of letters or symbols to allow detection of many different targets on a single test strip.”

Just think of the applications for this product, they are far reaching and would save many lives in developing world countries.

Do you have the expertise to save lives by developing advanced detection tools for the medical field?

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Travel can be risky – monetary crises, allergies to unusual foods, unsafe drinking water…and being a potential robbery target as you navigate unfamiliar locales.  Not that I’m advocating fear of traveling!  I love to go exploring anywhere and everywhere.  Sometimes, just getting there carries risks, too.

Read this short piece published by RedOrbit about a budding 17-year-old scientist named Raymond Wang from St. Georges School in Vancouver. Wang’s device sets up “personalized breathing zones” for each passenger.

Teen invents way to stop airborne viruses on planes

 

And watch the YouTube video linked there of the award for his prize-winning invention – and an interview with the inventor himself (you can click the pic below to go right to it…)

Airborne virus

With global concern about the spread of diseases, this young man’s invention may make the air we breathe safer for everyone – and it has applications far beyond commercial flights.  What adaptations can you envision?

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July 13th, 2015
5:14
 

Freedom includes the right to go where one wishes – unfettered and unafraid.  At least, that’s the concept…  When one is hampered by a physical impairment, travel becomes more challenging.  A short walk can become nightmarish when you are unable to clearly see the dangers that lie in your path.

Read about Alex Deans, and his prize-winning invention.  On June 2nd, he received the 2015 Weston Youth Innovation Award from The Ontario Science Centre.  At age 12, he identified a need to be met and worked on his own to acquire the skills and knowledge to address it.

He’s now 18, and the end result is:

iAid

 

iAid

Providing assistance for the visually impaired, the system works like a GPS, using ultrasonic sensors and smartphone technology to help in navigation for a human rather than a car.  To take on a project that was wholly altruistic in nature is truly remarkable.  Although the product is not yet available on the market, it is on its way.  And I, for one, am confident that Alex has more in store for us in the future!

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July 11th, 2015
5:42
 

It’s beach season here in the USA and that means lots of fun in the sun – swimming, frisbee, volleyball, picnics – and SUNBURN!

Here’s a nifty new idea that’s meant to save your tender skin from the harmful UV rays that we so love to roast ourselves under…all you ‘beach babes and dudes’, take note…  More wearable tech with a healthy purpose! (but, it comes with a healthy pricetag at present, too)

This bikini tells you when you’re getting sunburnt

 

Here’s a little more detail from: news.discovery.com/tech/gear-and-gadgets

“…the wearer will get a two-piece swimsuit with a small detachable ultraviolet sensor that, through a smartphone or tablet, sends a “sunscreen alert” when the user’s skin needs more protective sunblock cream.” – - – “…there’s even a “Valentine” function that sends the message to a boyfriend’s smartphone so he knows when to apply the cream to his girlfriend’s skin.”

 

Click the pic to view other items available from Spinali Design in France – - -

Ultraviolet bikini

This bikini tells you when you’ve spent too long in the sun (Picture: Spinali Design)

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Philips has announced that it plans to make 110,000 LED street lights in Los Angeles connected. The company will bring the lights online using new plug-and-play CityTouch technology. It is said to be quick and easy to install, and will allow the city’s lights to be monitored and controlled via the web.  Los Angeles will reduce its street lighting energy consumption by up to 70 percent, by switching to LEDs.

blog LA lights

The plug-and-play nature of the technology reduces the time and cost of programming and commissioning each fixture. Philips says the device can also reduce maintenance costs by around 20 percent, by automatically reporting faults.  And with reduced energy consumption comes reduced costs.

It would be pretty cool to be able to modify the lighting around my town!  Some streets aren’t well lit which makes it hard to detect the wildlife that may be lurking in your path.

Not only is this technology saving our planet by reducing our energy consumption, but it’s making it safer for it’s inhabitants!

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