Students for a Smarter Planet ..leaders with conscience
 

ITU Solar Car Team Race Journal

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I am a self-proclaimed chocoholic and couldn’t resist the chocolate temptation when I ran across this exciting use of chocolate.

I would have a tough time resisting the urge to drink the fuel (since, after all, it was derived from chocolate production)….

This started as an idea and grew into a viable, sustainable solution to production waste. Any ideas floating around about how to use the by-products of cotton candy production :-)

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The growth study has begun at USF. Environmental Engineering students are researching the direct effects of fertilizer treatments on the growth of rye grass. Students are utilizing different combinations of struvite, MCP, clinoptilite and chabazite to see which fertilizer and/or combination produces the greatest positive difference from the conventional fertilizers used today. Different methods of production were used to make the some of the fertilizers along with different amounts – a half and full dose are used. It is unknown what the specific trends are going to be until more weeks pass, however, there is promise of a good ending in this beginning.

Sprouts emerge a week after planting by USF students

Sprouts emerge a week after planting by USF students

The students involved in this endeavor under the direction of Dr. Sarina Ergas are Adib Amini, Veronica Aponte, John Pilz, Lindsay Guntner and Andres Garcia. Andres Garcia is a high school student who is utilizing his experiences at a research university like USF to sharpen his scientific abilities with hopes of a future career in science. Just as the symbolic growth of these sprouts show promise for interesting results, the students in this study hope to be a part of this until the end. Please follow us as we continue to provide updates on this growth study here on “Students for A Smarter Planet.”

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Hello World!

We are team “RaW” from University of Missouri – Columbia. We are very excited to have this opportunity to work with IBM company on the smart planet project. Our project introduction is as followed:

Protein is a sequence of amino acids and it always folds into a specific 3D shape. Structures are important to proteins because the functional properties of proteins depend on their 3D structure and structures are more conserved than sequence during the evolution of proteins. Structural Motif is a frequently occurring substructure of proteins. Motifs are thought to be tightly related to protein functions. Identifying motifs from a set of proteins can help us to know their evolutionary history and functions. Our project is to find the frequently occurring substructure using Big Data analytics techniques, in another word, to find one substructure from each protein, that exhibit the highest degree of similarity.

 

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October, 15th 2014
6:25
 

Here in the U.S., there’s been a growing trend to give incentives to people who reduce their use of non-earth friendly carriers (e.g., plastic bags).  While they are convenient, most are NOT biodegradable and create mountains of waste.  There has been some success – I’ve seen lots of shoppers at the grocery stores and farmers’ markets using canvas or cloth bags for their purchases.  Small victories, to be sure…but they do add up!

The Scottish have taken this further and there is a Parliamentary pledge for the entire country:

and click here to read the clip about:

The Zero Waste Scotland Carrier Bag Commitment

The Scottish Parliament has passed legislation that will require ALL retailers (food and non-food) to charge a minimum of 5p for each new single-use carrier bag (including paper, those made from some plant based materials and plastic), from 20th October 2014.

The Carrier Bag Commitment will recognise businesses who donate the proceeds from the bag charge to good causes, and all retailers are being urged to sign-up, free of charge.Here’s a story about one retailer, Superdry,  that’s taking the Pledge and donating their proceeds to the Trees for Life charity in the U.K.

Think about what kind of ‘bag-gage’ you use and carry – and make a conscious effort to reduce, reuse and recycle.  It’s good for everyone!

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